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Surname: Norman

Ancestors of Charles W. Milliken of Barnstable, MA

CHARLES WARREN MILLIKEN, M. D., of Barnstable, Barnstable Co., Mass., engaged as a general practitioner of medicine, has high professional and social connections which have brought him a wide acquaintance. The Millikens, though not one of the oldest Colonial families, have become allied with the posterity of the most distinguished early settlers, and the Doctor traces his line back to many whose names are suggestive of the interesting and important events of the ancient history of this region. There follows in chronological order from the first known American ancestor the genealogical and family history of his branch of the Milliken family.

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Descendants of Chauncey Sears of Fall River, MA

As will be seen in what follows the Fall River family of Sears here considered – to which belongs Chauncey Howe Sears, an extensive mason contractor and builder and one of Fall River’s well-known citizens and substantial men – is one of some two hundred and sixty and more years’ standing in this Commonwealth. The family history and genealogy of the Fall River family follow in chronological order from the immigrant settler.

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Captain Stewart, G. M. D. No. 655, Lagrange District

Captain Stewart, G. M. D. No. 655, Lagrange District Adams, Absalom Adams, James M. Allums, Britton Amoss, James Barnes, William Bays, John R. Bays, Moses Bays, Nathaniel Boman, Isham Boman, Larkin Boman, Levi Boman, Robert Boman, William Brooks, Isaac R. Brooks, John Brooks, William Burson, Isaac C. Butler, Whitaker Cardwell, William Collum, James Crawley, Bird Crawley, Turner Culberson, David H. Culberson, James H. Culberson, Jeremiah C. Curry, James Daniel, James L. Daniel, William B. Day, Stephen Dennis, Peter Dickson, Thomas Dunn, Barney Ethredge, Bryant Ethridge, Zachariah Funderburk, Washington Furgison, Burrell Gibson, Churchill Gibson, William Glenn, James Gresham, Davis E. Grizzle, Kinchen Guyse, Joel Harbuck, Henry, Sr. Harbuck, Henry, Jr. Harbuck, William Hendon, Henry T. Hicks, Jacob Hicks, Littleberry Hicks, Nathaniel Holmes, Benjamin Holt, William Hopson, William Horton, Jeremiah Jackson, Thomas Jenkins, John Jenkins, Robert Jennings, Robert M. Johnson, Lewis Johnson, Mordecai Jones, Willie Keeth, James M. Kilgore, Robert Kilgore, William Kirkland, John Kolb, Jonathan Latimer, Samuel M. Layton, Thomas S. Lewis, Henry. Lipham, John McCullars, Andrew McPost, Lindsey Mays, James Mays, Robert Meadows, Simeon Meadows, Vincent Miller, John C. Mobley, William Moran, Jesse Moran, William J. Morgan, Wilson Norman, Jeremiah Pace, Noel Patterson, James Patterson, John, Jr. Patterson, Thomas Patterson, William Peppin, Noah Phipps, Thomas Poe, Gilbert Poe, Jonathan Poe, Solomon Post, John B. Post, Samuel B. Powers, James G. Redding, John Reeves, James Rigsby, Allen Rigsby, Eli Rigsby,...

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Gleanings from English Records about New England Families

The classic work often cited by more contemporaneous authors on early New England families and the records of them found within the Principal Probate Registry, Somerset House, Strand, the Public Record Office, Fetter Lane, and the British Museum, Bloomsbury, while on a visit in London during the summer and fall of 1879.

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Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

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Biography of George R. Norman, M. D.

GEORGE R. NORMAN, M. D. One of the noblest professions, one of the most beneficial to mankind, the profession of all professions, which, while it is prosecuted for gain is in its very nature nearest to beneficial charity, is that of medicine. At the same time it is one of the most exacting upon its devotees. Shannon County, Missouri, is very fortunate in the number and character of its physicians and surgeons, and among those who have already been prominent in that calling is Dr. George R. Norman, who is a native of this State, born in Oregon County February 21, 1861. He is a son of Maj. M. G. and Mary A. (Wait) Norman, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this volume. In his native county Dr. Norman received his education and when eighteen years of age he entered the store of T. J. Boyd & Co., as salesman. One year later he took charge of the store at Garfield for a year, and then engaged in the drug business at Alton. This he continued from 1882 to 1884, when he was elected collector and served two years. In 1886 he commenced farming, but soon after engaged in the mercantile business, taking charge of Boyd’s affairs at Garfield. During this time he studied medicine and in 1889 came to Winona where he served as clerk for the Ozark Lumber...

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Biography of Jason F. Norman

JASON F. NORMAN. Special adaptability to any particular calling in life is the one necessary adjunct to success of a permanent kind. No matter what the vim and determination characterizing a man’s start in business, unless he is to the manner born, he will find to his sorrow that his line has been falsely cast, and the quicker he draws aside and takes up another, the better it will be for him. It has often been the case that a man will make a success of several different occupations, and this has been the experience of Jason F. Norman, who is not only engaged in general merchandising, but also in job printing and bookbinding at Romance, Missouri. He was born in Fulton County, Arkansas, in 1854, a son of Abner S. and Charlotte (Orr) Norman, the former of whom was born in Georgia in 1811, and the latter in South Carolina in 1815, their marriage occurring in the former State in 1834. Their first removal was to Arkansas about 1852, and after a short residence in Conway County they removed to Fulton County in 1862, and later to Douglas County, Missouri April 9, 1864, Mr. Norman was killed in Marion County, Arkansas, while with the Federal Army, but of which he was not a member, being a cripple. He was a farmer and school teacher, was a justice of...

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Biography of James P. M. Norman

JAMES P. M. NORMAN. One of the most popular and widely known of Douglas County’s county officers is James P. M. Norman,who has been identified with the growth and the interests of the county for many years. Mr. Norman was born in Carroll County, Ga., April 27, 1847, and is a son of Abner S. and Charlotte (Orr) Norman, natives respectively of Alabama and South Carolina. George Norman, grandfather of our subject, came from Scotland to this country, and brought with him the sturdy habits so characteristic of those of that nationality. Settling in Alabama, he there reared his family, and after a long and useful life passed to that bourne from whence no traveler returns. Abner S. Norman came to Douglas County, Missouri, in 1863, and the following year was killed by bushwhackers near Yellville, Arkansas He was with the army, but was not a soldier. Mrs. Norman died in 1881. Both were worthy members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. The father and mother had emigrated from Georgia to Arkansas, and settled in what is now Baxter county in 1853. In 1863 they came to this county, as above stated, being obliged to leave Arkansas on account of sympathizing with the Union. There was a family of eleven children born to this worthy couple: Nancy C.; Sarah A., deceased, was the wife of W. J. Cooley, of...

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Biography of William P. Norman

WILLIAM P. NORMAN. There is nothing which adds so much to the prestige of a city or town, in the estimation of the public, as a first-class livery stable. In this respect Harrison is certainly to be congratulated. Among her establishments of this kind are found men of great business tact and enterprise, and none more so than William P. Norman, who conducts one of the busiest, best-managed livery stables in the county. Mr. Norman came originally from Mississippi, his birth occurring in Marshall County in 1853, and he is a son of Jesse L. and Mary Ann (Clayton) Norman, natives of South Carolina, where they were reared and married. From there they removed to Mississippi some time in the forties and there passed the closing scenes of their lives, the father dying in 1874 and the mother in 1892. Both were Missionary Baptists for many years and were well and favorably known over the section in which they lived. He followed the occupation of a planter, and at the time of the breaking out of the Civil War was quite wealthy. Then he lost all. In politics he was a Democrat, and for a number of years he held the office of justice of the peace. His father died in South Carolina many years ago and left a large family. Grandfather Fielding Clayton was a planter, and died...

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Biography of Maj. Matthew George Norman

Beginning life with a clear head, true heart and high purpose, Maj. Matthew George Norman pressed on past the ranks of adversity and became what he is today-one of the most prominent and honored of Oregon County’s citizens. As a representative man of the county he is looked upon as one of the best type. Maj. Norman was born near Winchester, Franklin County, Tennessee, February 27, 1830, and was the seventh of eight children born to John and Elizabeth (Colquit) Norman, natives, respectively, of North Carolina and Georgia. The parents were probably married in Tennessee, and she died in Alabama in 1835. He afterward was twice married, first to Miss Nancy Tompkins, and after her death to Nancy Yealock. About the year 1833 he moved to Franklin County, Ala., and settled among the Cherokee Indians. There his death occurred in the year 1862, when seventy-two years of age. He served in the War of 1812, and was in the battle of Horsehoe Bend, serving as a corporal. In politics he was a Democrat. He had eight children born to his first marriage, one to his second and four to his third. Maj. Norman divided his school days with a system of work on the farm in Alabama, and while still quite young in years began teaching school in Franklin County. In January, 1853, he came to Missouri and located...

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Biography of John S. F. Norman

JOHN S. F. NORMAN. A more popular citizen and official of Oregon County, Missouri, cannot be found than John S. F. Norman, circuit clerk of the county. His conduct of the affairs of the office has been such as to commend him to the good opinion of the public regardless of party affiliation. He is a native of this county, born July 22, 1855, the son of Hon. Matthew G. and Mary Ann (Waits) Norman. The father was born near Winchester, Franklin County, Tennessee, February 27, 1830, but was reared in Franklin County, Ala., where he made his home until January, 1853, when he came to Oregon County, Missouri He was a soldier in the Civil War, and held the rank of major. When he first came to Oregon County there were few settlers, and his land was covered with a dense forest. This he cleared, and now has about 900 acres of land, with over 225 acres under cultivation. He had very little of this world’s goods to start with, a yoke of oxen and a wagon, and came here to get a home. Although he farmed for the most part, he also studied law and was admitted to the bar, but never depended on his profession for a livelihood. In 1859, previous to the war, he was made circuit and county clerk, and was holding that position...

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Biography of U. G. Norman

U. G. Norman has found his work in life and has rendered his chief service during his residence at Champaign as a building contractor. Some of the principal buildings of the city have been erected by him. A resident of Champaign County most of his life, he was born in Wayne County, Indiana, April 14, 1867, a son of John Scott and Eunice A. (Stover) Norman. His father was a farmer, and in 1869 removed to Champaign County, locating on a farm ten miles from Urbana, where he was engaged in general farming and in looking after the responsibilities and duties of a good citizen until his death in 1897. The mother died in 1912. The sixth of his parents’ children, Ulysses G. Norman grew up in the country, attended the local schools, and was at home on the farm until he was twenty-two. Then for a year he farmed and having acquired in the meantime a practical knowledge of carpentry he made his first venture in the building business by the purchase of a plat of land which is now known as the Norman Addition, and on which he built apartments and residences. After this initial success and experience he removed to Champaign in 1889 and now for nearly thirty years has been engaged in business as a contractor and builder. Among the more notable structures he has...

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Rough Riders

Compiled military service records for 1,235 Rough Riders, including Teddy Roosevelt have been digitized. The records include individual jackets which give the name, organization, and rank of each soldier. They contain cards on which information from original records relating to the military service of the individual has been copied. Included in the main jacket are carded medical records, other documents which give personal information, and the description of the record from which the information was obtained.

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