Surname: Newton

History of the Baptist Church at Norwich Vermont

In Norwich, as elsewhere, the Baptists were the first of the dissenting sects to contest the ground with the dominant New England orthodoxy. Soon after the settlement of the town we find mention made of Baptists here, and it is probable that a few of the very earliest settlers were of that faith. The following documents are transcribed from the town records: Willington [Ct.] October ye 6, 1780. “This may Certify all Persons whom it may Concern that Calvin Johnsen of Wellington is of the Baptist Persuasion and is one of the society of the Baptist Church in said Willington and is ready to help to support the gospel in that order. “Andrew Main, Clerk” “Willington, September 24, 1784. This may certify that James Johnsen belonged to the Baptist society and his father and mother are Baptist. Signed in behalf of the Church, “Andrew Main, Church Clerk” The above certificates were doubtless procured and lodged in the town clerk’s office by the persons whose names they bear, with a view to exempt themselves from taxation for the support of the Rev. Mr. Potter, the settled minister of “the standing order” in the town at that time, as well as to relieve them from expenses for the building of the first meeting-house then in progress. A law of the state early made taxation for these purposes compulsory on all taxpayers...

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1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George...

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First Settlements in Norwich Vermont

Having glanced thus briefly at the action of the Norwich proprietors in opening a way to reach their new township in the wilderness, and in dividing up a portion of its surface into lots suitable to become the homesteads of future settlers, let us pause a moment and see what had meantime been done in the work of actual settlement. I am indebted to Rev. Edmund F. Slafter of Boston for an interesting account of what was unquestionably the first attempt at settlement made within the limits of the town. I quote from the Slafter Memorial: “Samuel Slafter [of Mansfield, Connecticut], the father of John Slafter, being an original proprietor, and being at the first meeting chosen treasurer of the corporation, took a deep interest in the settlement of the town. At his suggestion, his son John made a journey through the forests of New Hampshire in 1762, to examine the territory and report upon the advantages it might offer as a place of settlement. He found it pleasantly situated on the western banks of the Connecticut, with a good soil, but for the most part of an uneven, hilly surface. He reported it well watered, not only by the Connecticut but by several small, clear streams, and by one more important one called the Ompompanoosuc, an Indian name signifying ‘the place of very white stones’ whose waters emptied...

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Potomac Tribe

A small group of families, whose names are mostly Newton and Green (figs. 40, 41), represent what may be the Indians who are recorded to Potomac creek, an affluent of about eight miles north of Fredericksburg in Stafford County, Virginia. We have not, however, clear proof that these descendants are actually of Potomac identity, although they now bear the name. They are not organized definitely, nor are their numbers known, except for a rough estimate which would put them at about 150. Like most of the tidewater bands, they are engaged chiefly in fishing. Hunting has been discontinued only...

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Cattaraugus Indian Reservation Map and Occupants, 1890

The Cattaraugus Reservation, in Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, and Erie Counties, New York, as delineated on the map, occupies both sides of Cattaraugus creek. It is 9.5 miles long on a direct east and west line, averages 3 miles in width at the center, dropping at is eastern line an additional rectangle of 2 by 3 miles. A 6-mile strip on the north and 2 “mile blocks” at diagonal corners are occupied by white people, and litigation is pending as to their rights and responsibilities. The Seneca Nation claims that the permit or grant under which said lands were occupied and...

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Slave Narrative of Eva Strayhorn

Person Interviewed: Eva Strayhorn Place of Birth: Johnson County, Clarksville, Arkansas When I was a child in Arkansas we used to go to camp-meetings with the white folks. We went right along by they side till we got to church and we set down on the back seat. We took part in all the services. When they wasn’t any church our old Master would call us in on Sunday morning and read the Bible to us and we would sing some good old songs and then go about our ways. Some of the songs that we sung still ring in my ears and I still remember the words to some of them. “Must Jesus bear the cross alone And all the world go free— No, there’s a cross for everyone And there’s a cross for me.” Another one was: “Oh, Jesus is a rock in a weary land, A weary land, a weary land, Jesus is a rock in a weary land A shelter in the time of storm,” We sang a lot of others such as: “I am Bound For The Promised Land,” “The Old Time Religion,” and “When I Can Read My Title Clear, To Mansions In The Skies.” My favorites was the ones I just give you and they are still my favorite songs. I was born in Johnson County, Clarksville, Arkansas. My father was Henry...

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Biographical Sketch of Smith Newton

Smith Newton, a merchant of Tiptonville, Tennessee is the son of John and Sarah (Box) Newton. His parents were born and raised in west Tennessee, and by their marriage had one son and one daughter. After his father’s death, his mother married Mr. Henry Walker. Smith Newton was born in Obion County, Tennessee March 12, 1840. In the beginning of the civil war he enlisted in the Confederate Army in the Fifteenth Regiment, Tennessee Volunteers, and served until the close of the war being in a number of battles and escaping without being wounded. After the war he came to Lake County and engaged in farming. February 22, 1869, he married Miss Catharine Burrus, who was born in Madison County, Tennessee in 1857. From this union three children, two boys and a girl, were born, but all died. After Mrs. Newton died, Mr. Newton married, October 17, 1880, Miss Mary J. Talbot, who was born in Arkansas, June 25, 1860, and by this marriage he has three children, one boy and two girls. Mrs. Newton is a Methodist. In politics Mr. Newton votes the democratic ticket. He has been in the mercantile business at Tiptonville for three years, carrying a good line of groceries, and owns 104 acres of land, under cultivation, in the county, besides some town lots in Tiptonville, and is a good...

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Biographical Sketch of R. Newton

R. Newton, agent for the S.C. & P. Ry. at River Sioux, is a native of N.Y.; moved to Boone County, Ia., in 1864; thence to Green County, and in 1868 settled in Harrison County. He was the first agent for this road, and billed the first freight on the...

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Biographical Sketch of W. B. Newton

W. B. Newton, Postmaster, blacksmith and farmer, Section 2, P. O. Arizona, is a native of Chautauqua County, N. Y.; came to Barry County, Mich., in 1851; came to Tekamah, Neb., in 1857; the following year removed to his present locality. He owns 267 acres of land; about two hundred twenty of this he has improved. In 1868, he opened a general store; continued this business till 1879, when he sold out to Mr. Ellis. He was appointed Postmaster in 1869, which office he still holds. He opened a blacksmith shop in 1865, which he has since continued. He owns a half-mile racetrack, which is used for training fast horses. He sold a horse in 1880, trained on this track, for...

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Biographical Sketch of Ivah Newton

Ivah Newton, born in Phillipstown, Mass., came to Hinsdale when a young man, married Sally, daughter of Daniel Rugg, one of the pioneers of the town, and settled in the northeastern part, where Hosea Butler now lives. He was the father of seven children, only three of whom are now living. Albert G., eldest son of Ivah, married first Emily Ide, who was the mother of his nine children. For his second wife he married widow Ruth Wood, of Templeton, Mass. Mr. Newton finally settled on the farm his son Rawson H. now occupies. Here he passed the latter thirty years of his life, dying in May, 1884, aged seventy-seven years. Two others of the family reside in the town, viz.: Mrs. Julia Davenport and Mrs. William Royce Another, Mrs. Hubbard Allen, resides in Orange,...

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Biographical Sketch of Capt. William Newton

Capt. William Newton was born in Colchester, Conn., Oct. 15, 1786. His father, Asahel Newton, had served several years in the army of the Revolution. He was in straitened circumstances and had a large family of children, of whom William was the oldest, and on him devolved a large share of the burden of supporting his brothers and sisters. Having learned the trade of a clothier he came to Sherburne in 1806 and worked with Landon & Mills at Bullocks Mills. He took a factory in New Berlin in 1807, and went to Camden, N. Y., and worked in 1809. Aug. 22, 1810, he married Lois Butler, a native of Wethersfield, Conn., who still survives him and is living in Sherburne with mental faculties unimpaired. Mr. Newton moved his family to Sherburne May 11, 1812, and resided here from that time till his death, which occurred August 13, 1879, at the age of 92 years. He bought twenty acres of land and in 1812 built the house now occupied by Jacob Kuhn, and near it a woolen factory, on the bank of Handsome brook, which was ready for cloth dressing in the fall of that year. The factory was burned in 1822 and rebuilt in 1823. It was again burned in the winter of 1826-7 and was not rebuilt. The house in which he resided at the time of...

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Biography of M. S. Newton

M. S. NEWTON. In Arkansas on the 28th of March, 1857, was born the successful merchant and one of Douglas County’s coming men, M. S. Newton. At an early age Mr. Newton began to assume the practical duties of a business life, and by diligence, good habits and a judicious use of natural tact, has developed a character which will tell for usefulness in his day and generation. He has acquired a commercial standing which portends for him that prosperity and rank among his fellowmen vouchsafed alone to those who that died in infancy. The maternal grandparents, Mr. Faine and wife, were born in Wales and are supposed to have come to this country before the opening of the Revolution. They located in the vicinity of Petersburg, Virginia, where they followed farming, reared a large family and are supposed to have died. After the death of John Cooper his widow continued her journey to Howell County, Missouri, and purchased the farm on which the subject of this sketch is now residing and spent the rest of her life in this neighborhood. She died April 24, 1894, lacking about three days of being ninety years old. Seventy-five years of this time she had been a devout Methodist. She became the mother of seven sons and five daughters: John T., was an orderly sergeant in Shelby’s army during the war; Sarah...

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Newton, Donald – Obituary

Funeral services were conducted at the Methodist Church last Friday over the remains of Donald Newton. Rev. Grissom of North Powder, officiated, due to the illness of Miss Blokland. Oregon Trail Weekly North Powder News Saturday, March 31,...

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Selina Minerva Todd Newton of Wolcott CT

NEWTON, Selina Minerva Todd8, (Ezra L.7, Ezra L.6, James5, James4, James3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Dec. 27, 1832, in Wolcott, Conn., died Feb. 17, 1911, married Nov., 1853, Joseph Newton, who was born April, 1822, died June 29, 1901. Children: I. Jennie Augusta, b. Feb., 1855, m. John M. Baldwin, who was of Woodbridge, Conn., and had issue: (1) Lena May, b. Sept. 20, 1877, d. Aug. 17, 1878; (2) Harry Miles, b. Sept. 15, 1879, d. April 2, 1908; (3) Edith A., b. March 18, 1883, m. May 16, 1906, Arthur S. Butler; (4) Clarence Joseph, b. May 18, 1889; he is m. II. Joseph Erwin, b. Nov. 24, 1862, m. Nov. 26, 1891, Cora E. Davis, who was of Woodbridge, Conn., where they now (1915) reside; they had issue: (1) Albert D., b. April 7,...

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Newton, Donald – Obituary

Haines Boy Drowns In Old Cesspool Neighbors and friends of the Lee Newton family of Haines were shocked Wednesday afternoon when news of the death of their five-year old son was learned. The lad was found shortly after he was missed, in an old cesspool in front of the Tom Smith residence. He had been with his father, an employee of the Haines Lumber Company, but a few minutes before and was evidently on his return to the home when he crossed a cesspool connected with the plumbing in the Smith residence. The covering broke through and little Donald came to his death in the slimy water below. It is thought the body was recovered in about thirty minutes from the time it entered the pool. Little Donald is said to have been head about the Smith home shortly after noon on the day of his death. It was presumed he was looking for his father at the time. A little later a search for the little one revealed the body. Little Donald is survived by his parents and four brothers and sisters. The body was taken to the West funeral parlors in Baker and prepared for burial. Oregon Trail Weekly North Powder News Saturday, March 24,...

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