Surname: Newman

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

Read More

Read Family of Massachusetts

(I) John Read, supposed son of William and Lucy (Henage) Read, was born in 1598, and it is said came to America with the great fleet in 1630. He is of record in 1637 in Weymouth, was in Dorchester the next year, and went from there to that part of Braintree now Quincy. In 1643 or 1644 he accompanied Rev. Mr. Newman and his church society to Rehoboth, where his name appears the third on the list of purchasers of the town. He was a man of large property for those times, and held the office of constable, which...

Read More

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Read More

Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In...

Read More

The Winchester Star 1901-1951

The Winchester Star is the paper of record for the town of Winchester, Massachusetts and was a weekly publication, coming out on Friday of each week. These files presently contain digital images of the Star from January 4, 1901 through December 26, 1947 (more to come). The Winchester Star liked to publish items of an historical nature, from biographies of leading citizens (past and present) to items of history in reference to events which occurred in the past in Winchester. The publisher also filled his pages with photographs, and it’s possible that you may find your Winchester ancestors photo within it’s pages, albeit, a paper photograph, while not ideal, may be the only likeness you have for an ancestor.

Read More

Washington County, Idaho Pioneer Honor Roll

In 1940 and 1943, a survey of everyone who had lived in Washington County, Idaho continuously for 50 years or more, was made by the Weiser American. These pioneer residents were especially honored at the Fall Festival held in the fall of both years. So far as is known, the list compiled by the survey is complete and perhaps the only record of its kind in existence.

Read More

Biography of Jacob Newman

JACOB NEWMAN. – In the person of the subject of this sketch we have one of the heaviest real estate holders and most progressive agriculturists of the county, and one that has well earned the name of pioneer, having wrought here for forty years. In all this extended time he has displayed stanch, manly characteristics, while his sagacity and untiring labors for the good of all and especially for the advancement of the principles of Christianity in the upbuilding and nourishing of the early church are well known to our citizens. Mr. Newman is the son of George and Barbara (Hammond) Newman, and was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1826, whence his parents removed to Ohio for about twelve years, and thence to Indiana for twelve years, and thence to Iowa and there passed the remaining days of their service on earth and went hence to their rewards. Our subject came from Iowa to this section in 1862. He soon homesteaded a quarter-section twenty-five miles from Baker City on the Powder river, and for seven years he gave his attention to cultivating the soil and raising stock. Then he sold out and removed to the Grande Ronde valley, settling one mile east from Old Town on a quarter-section of land. He followed general farming and raising stock steadily, handling his business with care and thrift and the result...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Charles N. Newman

(See Downing) -Thomas, son of Joel and Nellie (Quinton) Kelly was born in Polk County, Arkansas December 26, 1845. Married in November 1867 Valera Arkansas Britton, born in 1847 in Sebastian County, Arkansas. They were the parents of Bessie Kelly born at Westville, December 23, 1891. Educated at Centralia. Married at Centralia December 24, 1912, Charles N. son of William and Nancy Newman. They are the parents of Howard Lee, born February 22, 1914; Dellas Wayne, born June 12, 1916 and Charles Kelly Newman, born March 13, 1920. Mr. and Mrs. Newman are farmers, near...

Read More

Biography of Robert C. Newman

Robert C. Newman of St. Louis, special representative of the Missouri State Life Insurance Company, associated with the home office, was born January 11, 1891, in the city which is still his home. Here he was reared and in the public schools was educated, also spending one year in the Washington University… At the early age of twenty he began selling life insurance, associating himself with the Prudential Ifisurance Company, with which he remained from September, 1911, until May, 1915, and during that period he led the sales of the company throughout the United States. In 1915 Mr. Newman accepted a position with the Missouri State Life, since which time he has led the sales in St. Louis and in 1919 sold more than a million and a half insurance. That he has thoroughly mastered the principles and methods of salesmanship is evident. He is a convincing talker, a clear reasoner and strong in argument and, moreover, he is a firm believer in the value and worth of insurance regarded from many standpoints. In a word, he is a man of resourceful business ability who readily recognizes and utilizes opportunity and whose careful direction of his activities has brought most gratifying results. While a man of but twenty-nine years he has placed himself among the foremost insurance men of the country and it is doubtful if a man of...

Read More

Biography of John Ross Newman

In the large metropolitan cities are found a number of men who are able to confine themselves exclusively to some one specialty in medicine or surgery, but in the smaller cities, however much a professional man may incline to specialization, he is almost invariably engaged in general practice. An exception to this rule is the case of Dr. John Ross Newman of Fort Scott. Doctor Newman is a surgeon of rare attainments and ability. For the past six years he had handled only surgical cases. He is one of the very few men in the entire state who can be properly designated as surgeon without implying that they also handle general medical cases. The character and abilities which have since matured into professional fame were developed while Doctor Newman lived on a Missouri farm. He grew up in the country, was graduated from the Lockwood (Missouri) High School in 1901, and afterwards entered the Central Medical College of St. Joseph, Missouri, where he was graduated in 1905. In that year he came to Fort Scott, practiced general medicine for six months, and then returned to Lockwood, Missouri, where he continued in the same line of practice until 1908. His early experiences as a physician were such as to confirm his ambition and desire for surgery. On leaving Lockwood in 1908, it was with a determination to make a special...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of George W. Newman

George W. Newman was born in Keene, November 18, 1818. He has, by industry and good management, acquired a large property, and has probably built more houses in Gilsum than any other man. He is now engaged in the manufacture of lumber, in building and in farming. He has served the town as selectman, justice of the peace,...

Read More

Biography of Thomas Newman

In the veins of this gentleman flowed sturdy English blood, for in Dorchester, England, he first saw the light of day. In his boyhood he was brought to this country by his father, John Newman, and with him settled in Philadelphia, Pa., where the latter followed the calling of a mechanic, and eventually died. Thomas Newman attained manhood in the East and then embarked in the battle of life as a railroad engineer, but in 1858 or’59 turned his attention to newspaper work in Kansas, and through its pages advocated the cause of Abolition. After a short time he moved to St. Louis, Missouri, where he became a job printer, but during the war he joined the Missouri State Militia, and was in active service in the State. He was lieutenant of his company and was in a number of the engagements of the Price raid. In 1869 he came to Boone County, Arkansas, and established the first paper in this part of the country, which tool the name of the Boone County Advocate, and which was published with success up to 1876, when The Times took its place. Although he was a strong Abolitionist and Union man, he was a man of Democratic principles and became the first mayor of Harrison. He was a man of jovial and generous disposition, was finely educated, his friends were legion and...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Mrs. Sarah Byrd

Person Interviewed: Sarah Byrd Location: Georgia Age: 95 An Interview On Slavery Obtained From Mrs. Sarah Byrd—ex-Slave Mrs. Sarah Byrd claims to be 95 years of age but the first impression one receives when looking at her is that of an old lady who is very active and possessing a sweet clear voice. When she speaks you can easily understand every word and besides this, each thought is well expressed. Often during the interview she would suddenly break out in a merry laugh as if her own thoughts amused her. Mrs. Sarah Byrd was born in Orange County Virginia the youngest of three children. During the early part of her childhood her family lived in Virginia her mother Judy Newman and father Sam Goodan each belonging to a different master. Later on the family became separated the father was sold to a family in East Tennessee and the mother and children were bought by Doctor Byrd in Augusta, Georgia. Here Mrs. Byrd remarked “Chile in them days so many families were broke up and some went one way and der others went t’other way; and you nebber seed them no more. Virginia wuz a reg’lar slave market.” Dr. Byrd owned a large plantation and raised such products as peas potatoes, cotton corn (etc). There were a large number of slaves. Mrs. Byrd was unable to give the exact number...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest