Surname: Neal

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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History of Norwich Vermont Education

From the town records it appears that the first attempt to divide the town into school districts, was at a town meeting held November 19, 1782, when John Slafter, Elijah Brownson, Ithamar Bartlett, Joseph Loveland, Paul Bingham, Joseph Hatch, Daniel Baldwin, Abel Wilder and Samuel Brown, Jr., were made a committee for that purpose. Soon thereafter the committee reported that they “could effect nothing on the business of their appointment,” and were discharged. No further move in town meeting towards districting the town for school purposes appears to have been made until March 30, 1785, when, on petition of...

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Norwich Vermont in the Civil War

During the four years of war for the suppression of the Rebellion, Norwich furnished 178 different men for the armies of the Union. There were seven re-enlistments, making the whole number of soldiers credited to the town 185. By the census of 1860, the number of inhabitants was 1759. It appears, therefore, that the town sent to the seat of war rather more than one in ten of its entire population, during the four years’ continuance of hostilities. About the same proportion holds good for the state at large, Vermont contributing, out of an aggregate population of 315,116, soldiers to the number of 34,555 for the defense of the Union. Of the 178 men enlisting from Norwich, twenty-seven laid down their young lives in the service of the country. The soil of every southern state, from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, was moistened by the blood or supplied a grave to one or more of these. The town paid the larger part of these men liberal bounties, amounting to about $32,000, in addition to their state and government pay. All calls for men upon the town by the national authorities were promptly and fully met. The patriotic response of our people to the expenses and sacrifices of the war was, in general, hearty and emphatic; and yet candor and the truth of history compels us to confess that...

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Neal, Henry S. – Obituary

Fatal Accident Henry S. Neal, well known Grant county cattle buyer, was fatally injured Saturday night, and died at Prairie City hospital Sunday afternoon, as the result of an automobile accident on the road between Canyon City and John Day. Mr. Neal, in his machine, was attempting to pass another automobile when his car left the road and he was pinned beneath it when it overturned. He was rushed to Prairie, but died on the operating table before his wife could reach him. Mrs. Neal was at Conden when notified. – La Grande Observer. North Powder News Saturday October 4,...

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Biographical Sketch of William Neal

William Neal is a native of Darke County, Ohio, born December 5, 1817. He is the son of Caleb and Anna Miller Neal; his father being a native of Tennessee and his mother of Indiana. The early life of Mr. Neal was spent on the farm and in acquiring such education as was afforded in those times. He remained in his native town until he attained his twenty-first year when he commenced farming in Darke County, but after a few years labor removed to Adams County, Indiana, and engaged in stock-dealing and speculation for several years, when he returned to Darke County, where he was engaged in farming, and spent a few months in traveling through different parts of Illinois. He eventually moved to Henderson County, Illinois, and was for three years engaged in stock-raising in that County. In 1857 he came to Daviess County and located in Sheridan township, where he has since resided, giving his attention chiefly to farming and raising stock. In 1861, Mr. Neal enlisted in Company I, Twenty-fifth Missouri Volunteers, but remained on duty only a few months when he was disabled by sickness and returned home. After his recovery he returned to his regiment and was on duty until April, 1862, when be was again permanently disabled and received an honorable discharge. Mr. Neal was married, in Darke County, Ohio, October 1,1846, to...

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Slave Narrative of Lucy Brown

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Lucy Brown Date of Interview: May 20, 1937 Location: Durham, North Carolina An interview with Lucy Brown of Hecktown, Durham, Durham County, May 20, 1937. She does not know her age. I wuz jist a little thing when de war wuz over an’ I doan ‘member much ter tell yo’. Mostly what I does know I hyard my mammy tell it. We belonged to John Neal of Person County. I doan know who my pappy wuz, but my mammy wuz named Rosseta an’ her mammy’s name ‘fore her wuz Rosseta. I had one sister named Jenny an’ one brother named Ben. De marster wuz good ter us, in a way, but he ain’t ‘lowin’ no kinds of frolickin’ so when we had a meetin’ we had ter do it secret. We’d turn down a wash pot outside de do’, an’ dat would ketch de fuss so marster neber knowed nothin’ ’bout hit. On Sundays we went ter church at de same place de white folkses did. De white folkses rid an’ de niggers walked, but eben do’ we wored wooden bottomed shoes we wuz proud an’ mostly happy. We had good clothes an’ food an’ not much abuse. I doan know de number of slaves, I wuz so little. My mammy said dat slavery wuz a whole lot wuser [HW correction: wusser] ‘fore...

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Slave Narrative of Callie Elder

Interviewer: Sadie B. Hornsby Person Interviewed: Callie Elder Location: Athens, Georgia Callie lives with her daughter, Cornelia, in a 6-room house near the crest of a hill. Their abode is a short distance from the street and is reached by steep stone steps. In response to the call for Callie, a tall mulatto woman appeared. Her crudely fashioned blue dress was of a coarse cotton fabric and her dingy head rag had long lost its original color. Straight black hair, streaked with gray, and high cheek bones gave the impression that in her ancestry of mixed races, Indian characteristics predominate. Her constant use of snuff causes frequent expectoration and her favorite pastime seems to be the endeavor to attain an incredible degree of accuracy in landing each mouthful of the amber fluid at the greatest possible distance. As she was about to begin conversation, a little yellow boy about five years old ran into the room and Callie said: “‘Scuse me please, I can’t talk ’til I gits my grandboy off so he won’t be late to school at Little Knox. Set down in dat dar cheer and I’ll be right back.” Soon Callie returned and it was evident that her curiosity was aroused. When the interviewer explained the purpose of the visit, she exclaimed: “Lordy! Miss, what is de government gwine do next? For de God’s truth, I...

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Biography of Lemuel C. Neal

A representative of the mercantile interests of Lewiston, Lemuel C. Neal is engaged in the furniture and undertaking business and is a most energetic, enterprising man, whose success comes to him as the reward of his well directed efforts, and is therefore justly deserved. He is native of Wisconsin, his birth having occurred at Sun Prairie, Dane county, on the 12th of June 1845. His ancestors were early settlers of Maine, and there his parents, Thomas and Olive (Dalton) Neal, were born, reared and married. In 1843 they removed to Wisconsin, locating within its borders ere its admission to the Union. In 1867 they went to Kansas, purchased lands at Beloit, and there the father carried on agricultural pursuits until his death, which occurred in 1887, when he had reached the age of seventy-two years. His wife departed this life in her fifty-sixth year. They had nine children, of whom six are living. Lemuel C. Neal, the fifth in order of birth, was reared to manhood on his father’s farm in Wisconsin, and pursued his education through the winter seasons in a log schoolhouse, while in the summer months he assisted in the labors of cultivating the fields. When he was but sixteen years of age the country became involved in the great civil war, and from the beginning his patriotic spirit prompted his enlistment. It was not until...

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Biography of Horace E. Neal

For the past six years this enterprising young businessman has occupied the responsible position of cashier of the Capital State Bank, of Idaho, and is rapidly acquiring the reputation of being one of the ablest financiers in the state. Prior to his connection with this well known banking institution, now regarded as one of the best in the great northwest, he had had experience in the handling of finances, having for several years been engaged in the loan business in this state and in Colorado, and having served as the first county treasurer of Kit Carson county, Colorado, after its organization by act of the state legislature, his appointment coming from Governor J. A. Cooper. The ancestors of Horace E. Neal were Scotch, as his name indicates, and for several generations the family has lived in New Jersey and Ohio. James E. Neal, the father of our subject, was one of the early settlers of Ohio, and was; farmer by occupation. In politics he has been a Republican from the time that the party was organized. For his wife he chose Miss Mary A. Nincehelser, a lady of German extraction, whose family had long resided in Pennsylvania; and unto James E. and Mary A. Neal were born seven sons and two daughters, and three of the sons are numbered among the successful business men of Boise. The birth of...

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More Victims of Anti-Slavery Act – Fugitive Slave Law

Columbia, Penn., (end of March, 1852;) a colored man, named William Smith, was arrested as a fugitive slave in the lumber yard of Mr. Gottlieb, by Deputy Marshal Snyder, of Harrisburg, and police officer Ridgeley, of Baltimore, under a warrant from Commissioner McAllister. Smith endeavored to escape, when Ridgeley drew a pistol and shot him dead! Ridgeley was demanded by the Governor of Pennsylvania, of the Governor of Maryland, and the demand was referred to the Maryland Legislature. Hon. J.R. Giddings proposed the erection of a monument to Smith. James Phillips, who had resided in Harrisburg, Penn., for fourteen years, was arrested May 24, 1852, as the former slave of Dennis Hudson, of Culpepper County, Virginia, afterwards bought by Henry T. Fant, of Fauquier County. He was brought before United States Commissioner McAllister. Judge McKinney volunteered his services to defend the alleged fugitive. The Commissioner, as soon as possible, ordered the man to be delivered up; and, after fourteen years’ liberty, he was taken back to slavery in Virginia. Afterwards, bought for $900, and taken back to Harrisburg. Wilkesbarre, Penn., (Summer of 1852.) Mr. Harvey arrested and fined for shielding a slave. Sacramento, California; a man named Lathrop claimed another as his slave, and Judge Fry decided that the claim was good, and ordered the slave to be surrendered. Mr. Lathrop left, with his slave, for the Atlantic States....

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Rough Riders

Compiled military service records for 1,235 Rough Riders, including Teddy Roosevelt have been digitized. The records include individual jackets which give the name, organization, and rank of each soldier. They contain cards on which information from original records relating to the military service of the individual has been copied. Included in the main jacket are carded medical records, other documents which give personal information, and the description of the record from which the information was obtained.

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Biographical Sketch of Jay F. Neal

Jay F. Neal, dealer in groceries and provisions, Charleston; was born in Tuftonborough, Carroll Co., N. H., June 24, 1835; he is a son of Nathaniel Neal, a farmer of that town; his early life was passed in farm labor among the granite hills, but at the age of 19 years he went to Great Falls, and engaged in teaching just across the river in New Berwick Me.; he continued teaching during a portion of the year for twelve years. He graduated at the New Hampshire Conference Seminary at Tilton, N. H., in 1859, and entered the Sophomore class of the Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn. At the end of a year, however, his health becoming impaired, and an opportunity presenting itself to engage in teaching in the South, he left college, and, going to Bourbon Co., Ky., taught in the Millersburg high school until 1861. He then came to Charleston and taught two years in the public schools, after which he engaged in clerking for Henry Weiss in the hardware business, and afterward as bookkeeper for the Charleston Woolen-Mill, engaging in his present business in 1870. He was married by the Rev. W. B. Anderson on the 25th of March, 1863, to Miss Sarah E. Blakeman, of Charleston Tp., a daughter of Even Blakeman, now of Oswego Co., N. Y. They have one child – Mary...

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Biographical Sketch of J. W. Neal, M. D.

J. W. Neal, M. D., physician and surgeon, Charleston; was born July 22, 1851, in what is now Cumberland Co., but then a part of Coles Co.; his father. William Neal, is a prominent and wealthy farmer and stock-raiser, who came to the State fifty-five years ago, at the age of years, from Bourbon Co., Ky.; Dr. Neal remained at home on the farm till he was 19 years old, then entered Lee’s Academy, in this county, graduating in 1871, and at once began the study of medicine with Dr. T. B. Dora, of Mattoon. The winter of 1872-73 he attended a course of lectures in the Eclectic Medical College, Cincinnati, Ohio; in the spring of 1873, he began practice with Dr. Dora, and the following spring removed to Stockton; in September, 1874, he entered Bennett Medical College, Chicago, graduating and receiving his degree of M. in January, 1875. On the 19th of May following, he married Miss Lizzie McCrory, daughter of James McCrory, of Stockton, and removed to Hutchinson, Kan. On the 17th of February, 1877, he was elected Vice President of the State Eclectic Medical Society, at Topeka; in October, 1877, he returned to the Eclectic Medical College, in Cincinnati, where he graduated Jan. 22, 1878, receiving the first honors of the institution, being selected by his class to deliver the valedictory address; he at once located...

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