Select Page

Surname: Murray

Genealogy of Marion Marvin Spracklin

Marvin M. Spracklin, son of George Spracklin and Arloa Turner Minor,┬áremained a resident of Shelby County, Illinois for the rest of his life. On October 13, 1870 he married Mary Elizabeth Deal, daughter of Elias and Francis Elizabeth Broyles Deal. In 1877 Marvin became “our new groceryman, (had) adopted for his motto ‘quick sales and small profits,’ in consequence of which together with his affable nature and genial smiles, he (had) already secured for himself his full share of ‘public patronage’.” In 1906 Marvin had another occasion to smile since he had entered the Shelbyville Democrat office “Tuesday noon wearing a broad smile ‘the which won’t come off.’ Another grandboy to trot on his knee. The youngster (had) arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Murray early Tuesday morning and (tipped) the beam at ten pounds.” By 1918 Marvin and his wife owned six acres in Section 20 Cowden Township. Shortly thereafter they moved to Shelbyville, Illinois. Toward their later years in life, a surprise birthday dinner was given for Mrs. Spracklin’s 75th birthday. “Sixty-four of her relatives and friends gathered at the Spracklin home at noon. Among those present were her two brothers and their wives, Mr. and Mrs. James Deal of Lakewood, and Mr. and Mrs. Robert Deal and son Leon of St. Elmo; a sister, Mrs. Joseph Forsyth of Tower Hill. Mr. and Mrs....

Read More

Treaty of May 6, 1828

Articles of a Convention, concluded at the City of Washington this sixth day of May, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-eight, between James Barbour, Secretary of War, being especially authorized therefore by the President of the United States, and the undersigned, Chiefs and Head Men of the Cherokee Nation of Indians, West of the Mississippi , they being duly authorized and empowered by their Nation. Whereas, it being the anxious desire of the Government of the United States to secure to the Cherokee nation of Indians, as well those now living within the...

Read More

Biography of Thomas Murray, M.P.P.

Thomas Murray, member of the Local Parliament for North Renfrew, is a native of the county of Carleton, Out., dating his birth in the township of Gouldbourn, January 18, 1836. His father, James Murray, from King’s county, Ireland, came to Canada about 1825, and was engaged in commercial pursuits and afterwards farming, dying at Gouldbourn about 1846. The mother of our subject was Elizabeth Burrows, who died in 1854. Mr. Murray received his education in his native township, and at Smith’s Falls; and when fourteen years of age became an apprentice to the mercantile business with the late W. R. R. Lyon, of Richmond, county of Carleton. Mr. Murray married Miss Jane Copeland, of Richmond, in 1855, being about that time in business for himself in Ottawa; in 1859 removed to Pembroke, where, in company with his late brother Michael, under the firm of Murray Brothers, he commenced and did an extensive business as general merchants, for about five years, when Michael, who was a shrewd business man and very popular, died of brain fever, leaving a young widow and one child, now Miss Elizabeth Murray. He then took his next youngest brother, William, as a partner, and changed the name of the firm to T. and W. Murray, and has since carried on a large general business, dealing in lumber, and extensively in produce and raw furs. They...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of M. Murray

M. Murray, banker, stock raiser and dealer in general merchandise, was born in Scotland in 1840; came to America at the age of seventeen years, located at Little Sioux, and was in the employ of the mail service at fifteen dollars per month until 1862, when he removed to Denver, Col, and engaged in the stock and freight business. Six years later he returned to this place and engaged in his present business. He owns a fine stock farm of several hundred acres near town, on which still stands the little old log house that he arrived at in 1857, a penniless Scotch lad. It was the first building used for a store in Harrison...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Rev. Eli Boyd

Person Interviewed: Rev. Eli Boyd Location: Dade County, Florida Dade County, Florida, Folklore Ex-Slaves Reverend Eli Boyd was born May 29, 1864, four miles from Somerville, South Carolina on John Murray’s plantation. It was a large plantation with perhaps one hundred slaves and their families. As he was only a tiny baby when freedom came, he had no “recomembrance” of the real slavery days, but he lived on the same plantation for many years until his father and mother died in 1888. “I worked on the plantation just like they did in the real slavery days, only I received a small wage. I picked cotton and thinned rice. I always did just what they told me to do and didn’t ever get into any trouble, except once and that was my own fault. “You see it was this way. They gave me a bucket of thick clabber to take to the hogs. I was hungry and took the bucket and sat down behind the barn and ate every bit of it. I didn’t know it would make me sick, but was I sick? I swelled up so that I all but bust. They had to doctor on me. They took soot out of the chimney and mixed it with salt and made me take that. I guess they saved my life, for I was awful sick. “I never learned...

Read More

Biography of Lilburn H. Murray

LILBURN H. MURRAY, Springfield. The gentleman whose name heads this sketch is one of the best known men in Greene County. For many years engaged in business enterprises in which his name was always a synonym of integrity, he has in more recent years been the proprietor and publisher of the Springfield Democrat, which he has conducted in a liberal and able manner. He springs from sterling Scotch-Irish stock. John Murray, the father of our subject, was born in North Carolina, and received the common education of his day, and married Sarah Luttele, in Tennessee, where he lived some time. After marriage, 1834, he moved to Crawford County, Missouri, where he settled on a farm. He came to Greene County in 1835, and settled seven miles north of Springfield; 1837 he settled in what is now Murray Township, where he died in 1867. He was one of the substantial men of his township, owning 700 acres of land and some slaves. He reared a large family of children: James A.; M. L.; John K.; Marshall C., who died at sixty years of age, the father of a family; L. H.; Rhoda M.; Arimentia T. and David L. All the children except L. H. were born in Tennessee, within twenty miles of Knoxville. Mr. Murray was one of the prominent pioneers of Greene County. In religious opinion he was a...

Read More

Biography of David Murray

DAVID MURRAY. – This gentleman is a well-known capitalist. He has retired from active business, and is now reaping the benefits of a life full of even and unceasing hard work. David Murray is a name that every youngster in the Kittitass valley, Washington, is familiar with. It might be well for those very same youths if they had a few of the hardships to go through that Mr. Murray did in his early life. He was born in Maine in 1831, and at the age of twenty left his home to seek his fortunes in the Golden state of California. he embarked onboard one of the sailing vessels that brought a dry dock to the Pacific coast. Rounding the “Horn” with that massive bulk in cargo was no very safe undertaking. However, reaching California, he settled at Vallejo, on San Francisco Bay; and, not having been overstocked with money upon leaving his home, he was forced to accept what work he could obtain. He did the first work that was ever done on Mare Island, where the government works and navy yard now are. After finishing his employment there, he led a life of various pursuits for a period of ten years, among which were mining, lumbering and ranching during the great Caribou gold excitement of 1862 he made his way to that field, and took up a...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Charles B. Murray

Murray, Charles B.; chemist and metallurgist; born, Worcester, Massachusetts, April 6, 1866; son of Peleg F. and Mary Prince Murray; educated, common schools at Worcester; took B. S. degree at Polytechnic Institute, at Worcester, Mass., in 1887; married, Attleboro, Mass., Jan. 29, 1890; Ellen Lincoln Robinson; issue, two children, Philip F., and Mildred A.; after leaving school, asst. chemist at Joliett Steel Co., Joliet, Illinois; spent a year in Buena Vista, Virginia, as chemist, and a year with the Minnesota Iron Co.; January, 1893, was appointed chief chemist and metallurgist at the Eliza Johnson Works, of the Carnegie Steel Co.; remained with this company until 1904; then started a commercial laboratory in Pittsburgh; in March, 1907, sold out and came to Cleveland, forming partnership with Benedick Crowell, as Crowell & Murray, chemists, metallurgists and mining engineers; member National Geographic Society, Engineers Society, Western Penn., American Institute of Mining Engineers, American Chemical Society, and Society of Chemical Industry; member Emmanuel Lodge, No. 605, F. & A. M., Cleveland Chapter, No. 148, R. A. M.; member Athletic and Tennis Clubs. Recreations: Tennis, Squash and...

Read More

Biography of James Philip Murray

James Philip Murray. The largest institution of its kind in Kansas City, Kansas, is the Murray Baking Company. As a business it is one of the considerable assets of the community. Its product is known and appreciated by thousands of customers. The business affords employment, and on other grounds could hardly be left out of any list of leading enterprises. The business also had a human interest, since the plant is the outgrowth and product of the technical ability and the energy of one man, James P. Murray. Mr. Murray came to America some thirty-five years ago, poor in worldly goods but with a remarkable vitality and an eagerness and resolution to make something of himself. There is a heightened interest in his success because of the fact that he is a baker by accident rather than by deliberate choice. However, before taking up his experiences and activities in this country something should be said of his birth and family connections. He was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, near the Town of Dungannon, May 16, 1864, youngest of the eleven children of Philip and Margaret (Irwin) Murray. His father was both a farmer and a freighter, and in the days before railroads were built in Ireland he hauled a great amount of freight in wagons. He and his wife spent all their lives in the old country, where he...

Read More

Betsey Todd Johnson

JOHNSON, Betsey Todd7, (Eleazer6, Ruel5, Job4, Ithamar3, Michael2, Christopher1) married David Johnson. Children: I. Paulina, m.(???)Murray; they live in Madison, S. Dakota. II. David, lived in Auburn, N. Y. III. William, lived in Chicago, Ill. IV. Sarah, d....

Read More

Murray, Paul – Obituary

Paul Murray, 80, a longtime Baker City resident, died Jan. 17, 2005, at his home with his family around him. His funeral will be at 2 p.m. Friday at Coles Funeral Home, 1950 Place St. Visitations will be from noon to 7 p.m. Thursday and Friday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the funeral home. Private vault interment will be at Mount Hope Cemetery. Paul was born on Aug. 21, 1924, at Baker City to Elbert and LaRita Murray. He was a World War II veteran. After Paul returned home from the war, he went back to work for Safeway Grocery Store as a produce manager. He also worked as a produce manager for Chaves’ Food Store and in the produce department for Albertsons. As a young man, he worked various jobs around Baker City. He was a delivery truck driver for a beer company and worked for Cascade Natural Gas, converting propane stoves to natural gas. He married Irene Williamson on Feb. 19, 1950. They had three children: John, Paula and David. Paul studied at home to become a carpenter, working for several local contractors. He built homes around Baker City and Grizzly Bear Pizza Parlors in Oregon, Washington and Idaho. He will be missed. He loved working in his yard keeping it watered and groomed. He loved roses and it showed in the many he cared...

Read More

Biography of David Murray

DAVID MURRAY ONE of the most accomplished scholars and educators of our city and country is Dr. David Murray. Born in Bovina, Delaware County, N. Y., on the 15th of October, 1830, his earliest years were spent amidst the grand, rugged, picturesque scenery of his native place. He is of Scottish descent, his parents being William Murray and Jean (Black) Murray, natives of Ecclefechan, Scotland. In 1818 they emigrated to the United States of America. Possessing the sterling qualities of true, intelligent Scotch people, and impressed with the great value of education in its broadest sense, both moral and intellectual, they determined to give their children all the advantages of an education which lay in their power. Accordingly David, the subject of our sketch, was sent at a very early age to the district school of his rural home, and at the age of twelve we find him in the academy at Delhi, pursuing his studies with increasing interest and delight. He left this academy to engage in a brief business career, which was not so congenial to him as the calmer walks of science and literature. At the Fergusonville academy he was prepared for a collegiate course; and in 1849, at the age of nineteen, he entered the sophomore class of Union college, then in the days of its great prosperity and popularity under the presidency of Dr....

Read More

Rough Riders

Compiled military service records for 1,235 Rough Riders, including Teddy Roosevelt have been digitized. The records include individual jackets which give the name, organization, and rank of each soldier. They contain cards on which information from original records relating to the military service of the individual has been copied. Included in the main jacket are carded medical records, other documents which give personal information, and the description of the record from which the information was obtained.

Read More

Biography of Frank J. Murray

Frank J. Murray. Among the important business houses of Scottsville, Kansas, is the Fitzgerald Lumber Company, the efficient manager of which is Frank J. Murray, a member of one of the old pioneer families of the state, one that still owned the homestead secured many years ago. Frank J. Murray was born in Cloud County, Kansas, not far from Jamestown. His parents were Patrick and Mary Murray, of Irish extraction. They came to Kansas in 1869 and were among the first settlers to locate near Parkerville. In 1872 they took up a homestead and through industry and perseverance Patrick Murray developed an excellent farm. As with other Kansas pioneers, hardships and discouragements were many for a time, but Mr. Murray was an industrious, thrifty man, one who attended strictly to business and he prospered under conditions that a less determined one might have found impossible. Mr. Murray died at his home in 1911, leaving many behind to mourn, a large family and numerous friends who remembered that he was ever willing to help a neighbor over a rough place in life if he could do so. He was a faithful member of the Roman Catholic Church. His widow still lives on the old homestead. They had twelve children born to them, ten after coming to Kansas, and nine are yet living. Frank J. Murray was reared on the home...

Read More

Biography of Lilburn H. Murray

Mr. Murray is the son of John and Sarah (Luttree) Murray, and was born in Crawford county, Missouri, September, 1834. His parents came to Greene county, Mo., and settled seven miles northwest of Springfield, where they lived one year and then moved to Grand Prairie, where L. H. was reared and educated. At the age of twenty-one, he went to California, where he was engaged in the stock and mercantile business for about ten years. He returned to Springfield, Mo., in September, 1866, and soon went into the hardware business. The firm was McGregor & Murray for some five years, and McGregor, Murray & Noe, until 1876. During a part of this time he lived in the country upon what is now the Judge Cowan farm. In 1871 he was elected mayor of Springfield, and in 1874 was elected to the Legislature, being the only Democratic representative Greene had had since 1858. He has been a councilman from both the Second and Fourth wards. He took active part in the building of the Gulf railroad. John M. Richardson graded the road to Ash Grove and it lay for several years unironed, until Mr. Murray, H. E. Havens and Maj. Sheppard bought the roadbed and organized the Springfield and Western Missouri Railroad Company. They then took into the company, L. A. D. Crenshaw, G. D. Milligan, Judge Ralph Walker, C....

Read More

Search


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest