Surname: Mooney

The Osage Massacre

When the treaty council with the Osage at Fort Gibson broke up in disagreement on April 2, 1833, three hundred Osage warriors under the leadership of Clermont departed for the west to attack the Kiowa. It was Clermont’s boast that he never made war on the whites and never made peace with his Indian enemies. At the Salt Plains where the Indians obtained their salt, within what is now Woodward County, Oklahoma, they fell upon the trail of a large party of Kiowa warriors going northeast toward the Osage towns above Clermont’s. The Osage immediately adapted their course to that pursued by their enemies following it back to what they knew would be the defenseless village of women, children, and old men left behind by the warriors. The objects of their cruel vengeance were camped at the mouth of Rainy-Mountain Creek, a southern tributary of the Washita, within the present limits of the reservation at Fort Sill.

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Slave Narrative of Joseph William Carter

Interviewer: Lauana Creel Person Interviewed: Joseph William Carter Location: Evansville, Indiana Age: 100+ Ex-Slave Stories 5th District Vandenburgh County Lauana Creel SLAVE STORY JOSEPH WILLIAM CARTER This information was gained through an interview with Joseph William Carter and several of his daughters. The data was cheerfully given to the writer. Joseph William Carter has lived a long and, he declares, a happy life, although he was born and reared in bondage. His pleasing personality has always made his lot an easy one and his yoke seemed easy to wear. Joseph William Carter was born prior to the year 1836. His mother, Malvina Gardner was a slave in the home of Mr. Gardner until a man named D.B. Smith saw her and noticing the physical perfection of the child at once purchased her from her master. Malvina was agrieved at being compelled to leave her old home, and her lovely young mistress. Puss Gardner was fond of the little mullato girl and had taught her to be a useful member of the Gardner family; however, she was sold to Mr. Smith and was compelled to accompany him to his home. Both the Gardner and Smith families lived near Gallatin, Tennessee, in Sumner County. The Smith plantation was situated on the Cumberland River and commanded a beautiful view of river and valley acres but Malvina was very unhappy. She did not...

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Slave Narrative of Mrs. Phoebe Bost

Interviewer: Frank Smith Person Interviewed: Phoebe Bost Location: Campbell, Ohio Place of Birth: Louisiana Place of Residence: 3461 Wilson Avenue, Campbell, Ohio Youngstown, Ohio. Mrs. Phoebe Bost, was born on a plantation in Louisiana, near New Orleans. She does not know her exact age but says she was told, when given her freedom that she was about 15 years of age. Phoebe’s first master was a man named Simons, who took her to a slave auction in Baltimore, where she was sold to Vaul Mooney (this name is spelled as pronounced, the correct spelling not known.) When Phoebe was given her freedom she assummed the name of Mooney, and went to Stanley County, North Carolina, where she worked for wages until she came north and married to Peter Bost. Phoebe claims both her masters were very mean and would administer a whipping at the slightest provocation. Phoebe’s duties were that of a nurse maid. “I had to hol’ the baby all de time she slept” she said “and sometimes I got so sleepy myself I had to prop ma’ eyes open with pieces of whisks from a broom.” She claims there was not any recreation, such as singing and dancing permitted at this plantation. Phoebe, who is now widowed, lives with her daughter, in part of a double house, at 3461 Wilson Avenue, Campbell, Ohio. Their home is fairly...

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Biography of Daniel Mooney

Daniel Mooney, proprietor of a fine and valuable farm in section 18 of Compromise Township, came to America from Ireland about the close of the Civil War, and has had a long and active career in America for more than half a century. He was born in the north of Ireland, a son of Peter and Mary (Graham) Mooney. His parents died in the old country when Daniel was about twenty years of age. He had the usual education given to Irish boys, and about the time his parents died, having heard much of the opportunities of America, he came to this country, first joining his cousin, Patrick Grimes. From New York he came on to Illinois, having friends in Sangamon County, and was soon working at farm labor at wages of $20 a month. One of the great events with which he associates his coming to America was the assassination of President Lincoln at the close of the Civil War. Central Illinois was by no means so attractive or beautiful as old Ireland, but Mr. Mooney had the true Irish grit and determination and determined to make the best of his circumstances. While working as a farm hand on the raw prairie there were many unpleasant things to contend with, including mosquitoes and flies, fever and ague. He was industrious, and in a few years felt justified in...

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Biography of Haywood Mooney

Haywood B. Mooney first saw the light of day in the state of Georgia, seventy-three years ago. His father moved to Alabama when Haywood was a child. When he had grown to be quite a lad, being rather precocious, he was stolen from his home and from his parents by sporting men who gambled on horse racing of fine-blooded stock. They used him for light riding and he proved to be the very chap they needed in their profession, so they kept him for a period of three years by offering such inducements as would please the boy. About this time a war took place between the American Republic and the Republic of Mexico. Young Mooney was employed by the United States agent to carry the express mail from Mobile, Alabama, to Montgomery, Alabama. He continued in this capacity during the existence of the war. He then served as an apprentice and learned the trade of engineering and followed steamboating on the rivers for eight years. During this time his father had died and his mother had moved to Sulphur Springs, in Hopkins County, on what is known as the old Jim Mooney place. While Mr. Mooney was on his way to the county to see his aged mother, coming from Colorado River in Texas, where he had been engaged in steamboating for several years, he met Miss Martha...

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Biographical Sketch of Edgar J. Mooney

Mooney, Edgar J.; tailor; born, 1885; head of firm of Mooney Bros. in Cleveland, tailors; firm has been established sixty years; from grandfather to son, to son; member Athletic Club, Knights of Columbus, Cleveland Grays, Shaker Lakes Canoe Club. Recreations: Canoeing, Golf, and all Outdoor...

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Biographical Sketch of Michael P. Mooney

Mooney, Michael P.; attorney-at-law; born, Ireland, Oct. 22, 1866; son of Thomas and Anne McHugh Mooney; educated, Irish National and Intermediate Schools; married, Cleveland, Sept. 29, 1891, Mary Slowey; issue, Frank G., Robert E., Mary C., Agnes M., Charles A., and Eleanor E.; admitted to the bar in 1891, and engaged in continuous and general practice of law since that time, excepting two years of service in the law department of the city; asst. corporation counsel of City of Cleveland, 1891-1893, member pres. of Civil Service Commission of Cleveland, 1910-1911, and member Charter Commission of Cleveland, 1913; member State Board of Charters, 1913; director and gen. counsel, The Cleveland Life Insurance Co.; also Mutual Bldg. & Investment Co.; director and pres. The Realty & Rental Co.; director The Gund Brewing Co., and The D. C. Griese & Walker Co.; member local and State Bar Ass’n, Cleveland Chamber of Commerce, member Elks, Gilmour Council, Knights of Columbus, Catholic Mutual Benefit Ass ‘n, Branch No. 6, Master 4th degree, Knights of Columbus, for 4th Ohio District; member Athletic, and City Clubs. Recreations: Books, reading and collecting,...

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Biography of Volney P. Mooney

Volney P. Mooney, now probate judge of Butler County, had resided in this section of Kansas more than forty-eight years and had been successively teacher, merchant, lawyer and public official. The people of Butler County know him and trust him as completely as any other citizen. His father, the late Rev. Isaac Mooney, was one of the notable men in this section of Kansas. He was the founder of a town and community, and throughout his life held that community up to his own high ideals. It is not easy to lose sight of the tremendous influence either for good or evil exercised by the first comers to a new country. It is an old saying that “Birds of a feather flock together,” and the presence of one good man and true in a community is an incentive to others of like ideals and aspirations, and thus the pioneer of lofty character becomes the nucleus for the upbuilding of a community in which his purposes and standards of thought and action remain dominant for many years. That was true of the late Isaac Mooney. He was born in Miami County, Ohio, May 22, 1820, and came to Kansas in 1869. Coming into Butler County, he bought from J. R. Mead, the old Indian trader, the land lying south of Main Street in the present Town of Towanda. He took...

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Rough Riders

Compiled military service records for 1,235 Rough Riders, including Teddy Roosevelt have been digitized. The records include individual jackets which give the name, organization, and rank of each soldier. They contain cards on which information from original records relating to the military service of the individual has been copied. Included in the main jacket are carded medical records, other documents which give personal information, and the description of the record from which the information was obtained.

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