Surname: Mitchell

Washburn Genealogy of Bridgewater Massachusetts

John Washburn, first of the name here, was an early settler in New England, and was a resident of Duxbury, Mass., before 1632, in which year he had an action in court against Edward Doten. He was named in the assessment of taxes in 1633, and in 1634 bought a place from Edward Bonparse known as “Eagle’s Nest.” He and his two sons, John and Philip, were included with those able to bear arms in 1643. He and his son John were original proprietors of Bridgewater, and they with the son Philip settled in the town as early as 1665. He died in Bridgewater before 1670.

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Howard Genealogy of Bridgewater and New Bedford Mass.

The ancient town of Bridgewater, the first interior settlement of the Old Colony, has been the birthplace and the home of many who have made the history of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts rich in stories of good lives devoted to the development and uplift of the community, and not the least among these may be mentioned the late Capt. Benjamin Beal Howard, philanthropist, whose name is perpetuated in Howard Seminary, which he founded, and his son, the late Francis Edward Howard, philanthropist, statesman and upright, patriotic and useful citizen.

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Huet Genealogy of Brockton, Massachusetts

Reference is here made to the branch of this family to which belonged the late Joseph Hewett, who for a period of thirty years was an honored resident of Brockton, and his posterity, numbered among whom have been men prominently identified with the business interests of the city for many years. Thomas Huet, born in 1609, was an early inhabitant of Hingham and a landholder. Probably Huet’s Cove in that vicinity took its name from him. He married (first) Elizabeth, daughter of William Chapman, who died in 1639, leaving most of his property to his daughter just named. She died May 22, 1649,” in Hingham. He married (second) Mrs. Mary Cutler, widow of John Cutler. Mr. Huet was a tailor and resided in West Hingham. He was made a freeman May 26, 1647. He died May 24, 1670, in Hingham, aged about sixty-one. His wife outlived him and removed to Charlestown.

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The Descendants of Franklin Mary Noyes Rowe of Humboldt County, Iowa

Franklin Rowe, son of Lucy Stillwell and Lucian Rowe, was born in Onondaga County, New York, possibly at Manlius as his parents were married there March 16, 1826. Franklin was the youngest and eighth child, born December 30, 1836. He was the grandson of Ebenezer and Mary Rowe, his grandfather was born in 1772 and died February 16, 1828 and is buried in Christ Church cemetery at Manlius, New York, his name is in the 1820 census but not in that of 1810 so he must have come to Onondaga County between those dates but diligent search has not been rewarded with further information regarding the lineage of Franklin Rowe. He had the following brothers and sisters, whose names may not be given in order of birth: Elihu, Thaddeus, Charlotte, Caroline, Mary, Martha, and Lucy.

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Slade Family of Somerset-Fall River, Massachusetts

For the past hundred years – during almost the lifetime, as it were, of Fall River and its entire industrial life – the name Slade has been continually identified with that industrial life and also prominent in other lines of effort in that great city of spindles. In 1812-13, when the real substantial pioneer establishments in the cloth making industry of Fall River were projected and completed – the Troy Cotton and Woolen Manufactory and the Fall River Manufactory – began the Slade name in this connection, Eber Slade of Somerset being one of the most prominent promoters of one of the corporations; he became its first treasurer and filled the position until in the middle twenties. William Slade of Somerset was one of the owners of the site of these first establishments, and was himself an original proprietor of the Pocasset and Watuppa Manufacturing Companies. The brothers Jonathan and William Lawton Slade were among the founders of the celebrated cotton mills of Fall River, both becoming presidents of the corporation. John Palmer Slade, another of Somerset’s sons, figured largely not only in the industrial life of the city but in other lines, becoming president of both the Shove and Laurel Lake Mills. George W. Slade, one of the “forty-niners” of the Pacific coast, was for full fifty years one of the extensive and wholesale merchants of Fall River and his name, too, is coupled with the city’s industrial life. And of younger generations one or more of the sons of some of these are at this time officially and otherwise connected with this industrial life and in other lines, notably Leonard N. and Everett N. Slade, of the firm of John P. Slade & Son, insurance and real estate; David F. Slade, member of the law firm of Slade & Borden; and Abbott E. Slade, now treasurer of the Laurel Lake Mills.

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The ancestry and posterity of Joshua Dow of Avon, Maine

The ancestry and posterity of Joshua Dow of Avon, Maine traces from John Dow and Johan Coop of Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, England. The first descendant in America, Henry Dow, came from England to America in 1637 with his wife, four children, and a maid. He first settled at Watertown, Massachusetts before relocating to Hampton, New Hampshire. He wrote his surname variously as Dow, Dow and Doue. One of the first Dow to settle in Avon, was Joshua, son of John and Betsey (Strout) Dow, who moved from Portland to Avon soon after his brother and sister, and settled before 1828 near Mt. Blue and Mt. Blue Pond.

Surnames: Briggs, Bryon, Crockett, Davenport, Dickey, Doue, Dow, Dowe, Dresser, Dunham, Esty, Hall, Harnden, Harradon, Hinkley, Kinney, Kittredge, Ladd, McLaughlin, Mitchell, Orberton, Pettingell, Richardson, Ross, Sampson, Sedgeley, Stinchfield, Vining, Walton, Webber, and Worthley.

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Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Edward Hunt’s “Weymouth ways and Weymouth people: Reminiscences” takes the reader back in Weymouth Massachusetts past to the 1830s through the 1880s as he provides glimpses into the people of the community. These reminiscences were mostly printed in the Weymouth Gazette and provide a fair example of early New England village life as it occurred in the mid 1800s. Of specific interest to the genealogist will be the Hunt material scattered throughout, but most specifically 286-295, and of course, those lucky enough to have had somebody “remembered” by Edward.

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South Britain Connecticut Sketches and Records

This book contains much valuable genealogical data from local church records and cemeteries, and brief accounts of the following families : — Allen, Averill, Barnes, Bassett, Booth, Bradley, Bray, Canfield, Downs, Edmonds, French, Gilbert, Guthrie, Hann, Hayes, Hendryx, Hill, Mitchell, Pierce, Piatt, Post, Russell, Skeels, Stoddard, Tuttle, Wagner, Wakeley, Ward and Warner.

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A Genealogy of the Lake Family

A genealogy of the Lake family of Great Egg Harbour in Old Gloucester County in New Jersey : descended from John Lade of Gravesend, Long Island; with notes on the Gravesend and Staten Island branches of the family. This volume of nearly 400 pages includes a coat-of-arms in colors, two charts, and nearly fifty full page illustrations – portraits, old homes, samplers, etc. The coat-of-arms shown in the frontspiece is an unusually good example of the heraldic art!

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History of the township and village of Mazomanie, Wisconsin

The manuscript, History of the township and village of Mazomanie [Wisconsin] penned by William Kittle and published in 1900 collected information from a wide variety of sources, both documents, and living interviews. This book provides a general history of the township, and then presents a series of brief biographical sketches on the early settlers of Mazomanie. The links below will take you to the start of each historical section as detailed in the contents for the book, and then the specific pages of the book where each biographical sketch is contained. There is no index for the book, nor is there a list of biographical sketches contained within. We have taken the liberty of creating a biographical index for it.

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