Surname: Miller

Biographical Sketch of Robert Y. Miller

Robert Y. Miller, senior member of the above firm, was born in Greenbrier county, Virginia, June 27, 1838. He is the son of Robert and Rachel Miller, natives of the State of Virginia. He came, with his parents, at the age of two years, to Daviess county, and was reared and educated here. He began life on his own account as a farmer and subsequently kept hotel in Jamesport for a period of three years. Mr. Miller was married in this county, December 31, 1863, to Miss Elizabeth E., daughter of Richard and Ann Hill, natives of Pocahontas county, Virginia. Mrs. Miller was born in this county, March 18, 1845. The issue of this union has been four children, only one of whom, Ida B., is now living. Mr. Miller is a Democrat and occupies the offices of justice of the peace and town treasurer. This firm established their present business in 1879. They are energetic, enterprising merchants and carry a well selected stock of hardware and agricultural...

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Biographical Sketch of John M. Miller

John M. Miller was born in Greenbrier county, West Virginia, May 31, 1834. His parents, Robert and Rachel Miller, both natives of Virginia, when he was six years old moved to this county, where he was reared and educated in the common schools. In 1859 he crossed the plains to California, came back the same year and crossed again in 1860 and returned in time to serve one year in the Enrolled State Militia during the war. He is a farmer by profession. Mr. Miller was united in marriage, in October, 1863, to Miss Elizabeth C. Foster, who was born April 5, 1838, and died November 7, 1877. They had by this marriage six children: Mary B., born August 19, 1864; John Y., born March 24, 1866; May, born May 2, 1869; Effie, born December 22, 1871; Robert, born January 4, 1875; and Maud, born January 17, 1877. February 4, 1879, he married Miss Mary A. Goodbar, who was born .January 9, 1841, in Virginia. They have one child, Joseph, born January 7,...

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Biography of James W. Miller

Was born near Staunton, Augusta county, Virginia, May 14, 1823, where he lived with his parents, George M. and Margaret A. Miller, until his fourteenth year. He received a common school education, having attended the early subscription schools of his native county. Leaving home in 1836, he went to Lexington, Rockbridge county, Virginia, where he was employed as a clerk in the store of Moore & McCue, remaining with them until 1840, when he was employed in the same capacity by Samuel B. Finley, of the same place. From Lexington he went to Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1842, and accepted a situation as clerk in the store of John Cochran, remaining until 1843, when he returned to Augusta county and was employed by Thomas McCorkle, of Greenville, where he remained until 1847, then became associated with his employer as a partner, at Anthony’s Creek, Greenbrier county, Virginia, under the firm name of McCorkle & Miller. Retiring from the firm in 1848, he went to Hillsborough, Pocahontas county, same State, where he established himself in the mercantile business and continued there until 1854, when he migrated to Missouri, and settled upon a farm in what is now Jamesport township, this county. In 1861 he cast his lot with the Confederacy, enlisting in the Missouri State Guards, under General William Y. Slack, Captain John McNeel, and serving during the war in the...

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Biography of Benton Miller

The subject of this sketch was born in Sardis, Monroe county, Ohio, December 26, 1838. He lived in his birthplace until he was sixteen years of age, when his parents moved to Missouri and settled in what is now Colfax township, Daviess county, in 1855. In 1861 he enlisted and served six months in the home guards, and in February, 1862, enlisted in Company A, First Missouri Cavalry Militia, in which he served during the war. In April, 1863, he was promoted from orderly sergeant to first lieutenaut, and for the last eighteen months he was in the service, had command of his company. He participated in all the engagements against General Joe Shelby in his raids in Missouri in 1863, also in the fights during General Sterling Price’s raids in this State and Kansas during the fall of 1864, and many skirmishes of less note with the guerrillas under Quantrell and Anderson. With his company, was mustered out at St. Louis on the 11th of February, 1865, and returned to the old homestead in Daviess county. Remaining upon the farm until the following October, he came to Gallatin and engaged in general merchandizing with his brother Michael, under the name of Miller & Brother, continuing the business until the fall of 1868, when he retired from the firm. In March, 1869, he again embarked in the mercantile business,...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Robert Miller

Nellie Anderson, born Feb. 9, 1884, educated, locally. Married at Pryor April 21, 1903 to Robert Miller, born January 18, 1879 in Mayes County, Oklahoma. They are the parents of: Tip Bluford, born December 31, 1905; Martha LaVaughn, born April 29, 1908, and Roberta M. Miller, born June 2, 1912. Rufus Anderson, born February 27, 1853, in Illinois. Married in 1877, Melvina Wayburn, born January 27,...

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Certificate to Franklin D. Love from Dr. E.S. Miller

Copy of a certificate given to me by Dr. E.S. Miller now living in Johnson City, Tennessee, and who was my Father’s family physician-F.D. Love Johnson City, Tennessee. April 11th, 1902 This is to certify that I, Dr. E. S. Miller, (family physician of Robert Love, deceased,) at and before the death of COL. Robert Love, who died at his home in Johnson City, Washington County, Tennessee, Sept. 1st, 1876, heard him say that he wanted Franklin D. Love, his youngest child, to have his watch, the one he wore up to the day of his death; that I repeatedly heard him say the above, even while he lay ill with his last sickness. The said watch being No. 28228, a Swiss movement, made Jules Jaccard, Geneva, Switzerland. This the 11th day of April 1902. E. S. Miller, Jr., M.D. (Signed) Note: this is the watch I now wear, and it was the one that my Father, Robert Love, wore prior to his death, and he and Judge John Baxter, his brother-in-law, can Capt John Jaques, First President of the road running through Johnson City, purchased one each, by ordering the same from the Factory in Switzerland. They cost at that time $280.00 each. I got this certificate from Dr. Miller when I was back in Tennessee in the year 1902, because my brother Nathaniel seemed to think that...

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Treaty of May 6, 1828

Articles of a Convention, concluded at the City of Washington this sixth day of May, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-eight, between James Barbour, Secretary of War, being especially authorized therefore by the President of the United States, and the undersigned, Chiefs and Head Men of the Cherokee Nation of Indians, West of the Mississippi , they being duly authorized and empowered by their Nation. Whereas, it being the anxious desire of the Government of the United States to secure to the Cherokee nation of Indians, as well those now living within the...

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Treaty of August 24, 1835

Treaty with the Comanche and Witchetaw Indians and their associated Bands. For the purpose of establishing and perpetuating peace and friendship between the United States of America and the Comanche and Witchetaw nations, and their associated bands or tribes of Indians, and between these nations or tribes, and the Cherokee, Muscogee, Choctaw, Osage, Seneca and Quapaw nations or tribes of Indians, the President of the United States has, to accomplish this desirable object, and to aid therein, appointed Governor M. Stokes, M. Arbuckle Brigdi.-Genl. United States army, and F. W. Armstrong, Actg. Supdt. Western Territory, commissioners on the part of the United States; and the said Governor M. Stokes and M. Arbuckle, Brigdi. Genl. United States army, with the chiefs and representatives of the Cherokee, Muscogee, Choctaw, Osage, Seneca, and Quapaw nations or tribes of Indians, have met the chiefs, warriors, and representatives of the tribes first above named at Camp Holmes, on the eastern border of the Grand Prairie, near the Canadian river, in the Muscogee nation, and after full deliberation, the said nations or tribes have agreed with the United States, and with one another upon the following articles: Article 1. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America, and all the individuals composing the Comanche and Witchetaw nations and their associated bands or tribes of Indians, and...

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Slave Narrative of Richard Miller

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Richard Miller Location: Indiana Place of Birth: Danville, Kentucky Date of Birth: January 12, 1843 Place of Residence: 1109 North West Street Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE RICHARD MILLER-AN OLD SOLDIER 1109 North West Street Richard Miller was born January 12, 1843 in Danville, Kentucky. His mother was an English subject, born in Bombay, India and was brought into America by a group of people who did not want to be under the English government. They landed in Canada, came on to Detroit, stayed there a short time, then went to Danville, Kentucky. There she married a slave named Miller. They were the parents of five children. After slavery was abolished, they bought a little farm a few miles from Danville, Kentucky. The mother was very ambitious for her children, and sent them to the country school. One day, when the children came home from school, their mother was gone; they knew not where. It was learned, she was sending her children to school, and that was not wanted. She was taken to Texas, and nothing, was heard from her until 1871. She wrote her brother she was comming to see them, and try to find her children, if any of them were left. The boy, Richard, was in the army. He was...

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Biographical Sketch of Josiah Miller

Josiah Miller, a pioneer newspaper man of Lawrence and Kansas, an ardent free-soiler and public official in the formative periods of the territory and the state, was born in Chester District, South Carolina, November 12, 1828. He gradnated from the Indiana University in 1851, and from the law school at Poughkeepsie, New York, and in August, 1854, came to Kansas. As his father had been waylaid and mobbed because of his anti-slavery views, it was but natural that Josiah should be an ardent opponent of slavery, and on January 5, 1855, he began the publication of the Kansas Free State at Lawrence. A pro-slavery jury found an indictment against him for maintaining a nuisance in its publication, and on May 21, 1856, his printing office was destroyed by the territorial anthorities. In that year he made speeches in several states for John C. Fremont, the republican candidate for president, and in 1857 was elected probate judge of Douglas County. In 1861 he was a member of the first State Senate, but resigned his seat in that body to become postmaster at Lawrence. In 1863 he was appointed a paymaster in the army, with the rank of major, and in 1866 was elected a member of the Legislature. His death occurred at Lawrence on July 7, 1870, after having a leg amputated. The inscription on the monument erected to his...

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Slave Narrative of Jane Smith

Interviewer: F. S. DuPre Person Interviewed: Jane Smith Location: Spartanburg, South Carolina Age: 80 “Aunt” Jane Smith, 80 years old, says that she was only eight years old when the war ended, and that her recollections are very meagre as to conditions during slavery. Her mother belonged to John Snoddy, who owned a farm a few miles west of Spartanburg. Her father was owned by Dr. Miller of a nearby plantation. She stated that she was old enought to rock the cradle for the white babies during slavery. She stated that she could remember seeing some of the slaves being whipped on their bare backs with a plaited hickory stick, or thong. She never received any whippings. She said that a man once cut at her with his thong, but that she escaped the blow by dodging. She said she remembered seeing a small child with a piece of bread in its hand when a hog entered the house and in snatching at the bread, caught the child’s hand near the thumb with its tusks. When running off, the hog carried the child with it, dragging it along into the field. All the other children and some men ran after the hog and caught it. The other colored children were whipped, but by staying in the house and watching the babies, keeping them safe from other pigs which had...

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Hodgen Cemetery, Hodgen, LeFlore County, Oklahoma


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