Surname: Miles

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In...

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1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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History of Norwich Vermont Education

From the town records it appears that the first attempt to divide the town into school districts, was at a town meeting held November 19, 1782, when John Slafter, Elijah Brownson, Ithamar Bartlett, Joseph Loveland, Paul Bingham, Joseph Hatch, Daniel Baldwin, Abel Wilder and Samuel Brown, Jr., were made a committee for that purpose. Soon thereafter the committee reported that they “could effect nothing on the business of their appointment,” and were discharged. No further move in town meeting towards districting the town for school purposes appears to have been made until March 30, 1785, when, on petition of...

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A Brief History of Norwich University

In 1835, the American Literary, Scientific, and Military Academy became “Norwich University,” by virtue of an act of incorporation granted by the legislature of Vermont the previous year. Captain Alden Partridge remained at the head of the institution until 1843, and soon after sold the buildings and grounds to the Trustees of the University. There was one feature in the scheme of education established at Norwich University which honorably distinguished it from nearly all other similar institutions of its time in New England. From the first it was wholly free from sectarian influence. This principle was prominently set forth...

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Norwich Vermont in the War of 1812

In the spring of 1812, war with Great Britain again seemed imminent. Causes of complaint against the aggressions of the British government had existed for a long time, and the irritation was now increasing on all sides. It did not seem possible that actual war could much longer be postponed, although public opinion in the United States was still far from unanimous for an immediate appeal to arms. Norwich, as had been her wont in Revolutionary times, again let her voice be heard when great public and national interests were being agitated before the people. At the close of a town meeting held June 18, 1812, a paper was presented to the meeting containing the preamble and resolutions which we copy below. On account of the great length of the preamble, we are obliged to abridge it considerably. The document was obviously drawn up with much care by some person familiar with the political history of the country. After some debate the clerk was directed to read the paper. A spirited discussion ensued, and the preamble and resolutions were finally adopted by a large majority, as true in their statement of facts and expressive of the sense of the town on the question at issue. It was voted that the same be put* on record in the town clerk’s office. A final clause appended to the fourth resolution denouncing...

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Powhatan Pottery

First let us look over the material from the Virginia tidewater area. Everywhere here from the southern boundary of Virginia by actual observation, north-ward even through the Delaware valley, the pot-sherds are almost identical in material, decoration and color. Holmes has appropriately called the ceramics of the tidewater “the Algonquian type.” On the Pamunkey, Mattaponi, Rappahannock, James, and Chickahominy rivers it is all the same, the rims, decorations, and ingredients being practically uniform within a certain range of variation.

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Powhatan Canoes

The means provided by the Powhatan tribes for transporting themselves about in their marshy wastes was the dugout canoe. This article describes these canoes, their method of manufacture, and provides pictures of them and their paddles.

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Pamunkey Hunting Grounds

Perhaps the most striking feature of all in the natural history of the modern Pamunkey comes before us in the survival of the controlled hunting and trapping rights: the custom by which each hunter in the band controls an assigned and definitely bounded area within which he enjoys the exclusive privilege of setting his traps for fur-bearing animals.

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel Miles

Miles, Samuel, Monkton, was born in Canada on January 1, 1835, and removed to Monkton with his parents in 1843. He was married in 1856 to Phebe Ann Thompson, who was born in Richmond, Chittenden county, Vt., in 1835. They have had a family of six children — Ellen E., Alfred B., Francis A., Caroline E., Edward S., and J. William. He was a son of Henry and Mary (Hagen) Miles, who were born and married in England, and settled in Canada in 1832, and in 1839 came to Addison county, Vt., where they died in 1885. They had a family of nine children born to them, four of whom are now living — Lucy M. Dean, Henry, Sarah M. Hazard, and Samuel. Richard was a missionary in West Africa for seven years. He died in England in...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. John B. Miles

(See Oolootsa and Riley)-Lucy D., daughter of Monroe Calvin and Lucy Lowrey (Hoyt) Kyes was born March 31, 1872. Educated in Female Seminary. Married at Pleasant Hill, December 26, 1894 John Benedict, son of Mr. and Mrs. Benedict Miles. They are the parents of: Benedict Franklin, born October 3, 1895; Elizabeth, born January 16, 1897; Guy, born ay 31, 1904 and Lydia Esther Miles, born May 12, 1906. Benedict Franklin Miles was in the A. E. F. He is a prosperous farmer near Miles. James Herbert and Cora Archer Moore are the parents of: William, born January 13, 1900; Foreman, born September 13, 1902; Veta Clara, born April 20, 1905; Nellie, born January 6, 1907; James Herbert, born February 26, 1914; Len Ross, born November 21, 1918; Joseph and Samuel, born July 31,...

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Biography of Willis F. Miles

WILLIS F. MILES. Petty difficulties of Young Township, Boone County, Arkansas, wend their way to the office of our subject and find in him an arbiter that as a rule sends the respective parties away in better humor with themselves and with the world in general than on coming to him, for he is a gentleman who, although having an extended knowledge of the prosaic aspects of life, is prone to see the humorous side, and gild the baser metal with the brightness of wit. Willis F. Miles was born in Lincoln County, Tennessee, in 1831, and is a son of Hosea and Nancy (Mayfield) Miles, natives of the Palmetto State, the former born in 1802 and the latter in 1801. Previous to her union with Mr. Miles, the mother married a Mr. Cownover, and after his death she came to Tennessee, where she was subsequently married to Mr. Miles and passed the remainder of her days, dying in Giles County in 1849. Mr. Miles died in Lawrence County, Tennessee, about 1868. Both were members of the Christian Church. Mr. Miles was engaged in agricultural pursuits all his life. The grandfather, Isaac Miles, was born in South Carolina, and there passed his entire life, dying when our subject was a boy. He was but a small boy during the Revolutionary War and his father, Thomas Miles, was a soldier...

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Biography of Davis A. Miles

DAVIS A. MILES is one of the younger class of business men that have stepped forward to press to completion the work that has been so well inaugurated by the sturdy pioneers of the county; and we would be open to the charge of incompleteness did we fail to mention this prosperous and well known gentleman, by giving a review of the salient points of his career, which has been largely spent in this county. In 1867 in the Grande Ronde valley near Union, in Union county, the subject of this biographical memoir was born to P.H. and Mary A. (Crimin) Miles. His education was obtained largely in the schools of Union county, graduating from the higher school at Union. When he had reached the age of eighteen years he began mining for himself and continued at that occupation for some time. Later he joined the ranks of the educators, where he was successful and taught in different places, ten months of the time being in Spokane, Washington, also reading law under David Herman of that city. Succeeding this he returned to the industry that was most attractive to him, mining, and prosecuted it with vigor for some years, then was appointed chief deputy in the sheriff’s office in 1898, where he is still serving at the present time. His mining industry has taken him to various parts of...

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