Surname: Melton

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

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Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In...

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Disbursements to Cherokees under the Treaty of May 6, 1828

Abstract of disbursements and expenditures made by George Vashon, Indian Agent for the Cherokees west of the Mississippi, under the stipulations of the Treaty with said tribe of 6th May, 1828, between the 16th September, 1830, and the 31st December, 1833. In total this list represents 390 Cherokee families and 1835 individuals who each received 25.75 as part of their payment under the 5th article of the treaty of 6th May, 1828.

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Treaty of August 24, 1835

Treaty with the Comanche and Witchetaw Indians and their associated Bands. For the purpose of establishing and perpetuating peace and friendship between the United States of America and the Comanche and Witchetaw nations, and their associated bands or tribes of Indians, and between these nations or tribes, and the Cherokee, Muscogee, Choctaw, Osage, Seneca and Quapaw nations or tribes of Indians, the President of the United States has, to accomplish this desirable object, and to aid therein, appointed Governor M. Stokes, M. Arbuckle Brigdi.-Genl. United States army, and F. W. Armstrong, Actg. Supdt. Western Territory, commissioners on the part of the United States; and the said Governor M. Stokes and M. Arbuckle, Brigdi. Genl. United States army, with the chiefs and representatives of the Cherokee, Muscogee, Choctaw, Osage, Seneca, and Quapaw nations or tribes of Indians, have met the chiefs, warriors, and representatives of the tribes first above named at Camp Holmes, on the eastern border of the Grand Prairie, near the Canadian river, in the Muscogee nation, and after full deliberation, the said nations or tribes have agreed with the United States, and with one another upon the following articles: Article 1. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America, and all the individuals composing the Comanche and Witchetaw nations and their associated bands or tribes of Indians, and...

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Biography of J. D. Melton

J. D. MELTON. The question of food supplies is one that agitates the whole human family, and is the first with which they have to grapple. Without doubt the well-appointed grocery establishment furnishes the best solution of feeding the masses, and in this connection due reference is made to that over which J. D. Melton presides and of which he is the proprietor. He was born in the neighborhood of Galena, Missouri, December 6, 1842, a son of Austin and Elsie (Haley) Melton, and grandson of Ansel Melton, who was one of the pioneers of Tennessee. In that State Austin Melton was born in 1805, and from that region he came to Polk County, Missouri, in 1834, and there made his home for some three or four years. He then came to Stone County and settled about one mile south of where Galena now stands, on 100 acres of Government land, which he entered. Oh this land he built a log house in which he lived until 1858, when he moved to the town of Galena. After the death of his wife there he moved to Laclede County and from that time until his death, which occurred in 1892, he resided on a farm about eight miles from Lebanon. All his life he was a Democrat and held a number of township offices. His wife, a Tennessean by birth,...

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Biography of B. B. Melton

B. B. MELTON. Since the year 1851 Mr. Melton has been a resident of Christian County, and he is one of the best-known and much esteemed citizens of this section. It is a pleasure to chronicle the history of a man whose life has been one of honor and usefulness and although he is now in his seventy-fifth year, time has dealt leniently with him, and he is in the enjoyment of comparatively good health. Like many other citizens of the county, he is a native of Tennessee, born in Cannon County, August 12, 1820, to the marriage of Jacob and Lucy (Matthews) Melton. The parents came to this county in 1851, located in Elk Valley, southwest of Ozark, and there passed the remainder of their days, the mother dying in 1865 and the father in October, 1871. Shortly after this worthy couple’s marriage, which occurred in Alabama, they moved to Tennessee, and from there to this State. Both were natives of North Carolina, and they were among the pioneers of the Big Bend State. Grandfather Matthews was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. The father of our subject followed farming all his life and was fairly successful in that occupation. To his marriage were born eleven children: Mary, James M., Nancy A., B. B. (our subject), Elizabeth, Eliza J., Angeline, Ansel, Thomas, Elsie and Tilitia. Five of these...

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Biography of Maj. James A. Melton

The intelligence and ability shown by Maj. Melton as a progressive tiller of the soil, and the interest he has taken in the advancement of measures for the good of Stone County, Missouri, caused him long since to be classed as one of the leading citizens of his section. All that he has achieved or gained has come as the result of his own efforts, and he deserves much credit for the determined way in which he faced and overcame many difficulties. In tracing his genealogy, we find that his ancestors came originally from England, settled in North Carolina, and the grandfather, Ansel Melton, who was a native of that State, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. The latter moved his family to Cannon County, Tennessee, and settled near Sugar Tree Knob in 1810, being one of the very first settlers of that State. He lived to be nearly one hundred years old, and died on the farm where he had first settled. His wife, too, reached an extraordinary age, dying when one hundred and four years of age. The Melton family for the most part held membership in the Christian Church. The father of our subject, Austin Melton, was born in the Old North State, and was but five years of age when he moved with his parents to Cannon County, Tennessee There he grew to manhood...

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