Surname: McWilliams

Slave Narrative of Lou Smith

Person Interviewed: Lou Smith Location: Platter, Oklahoma Age: 83 Occupation: Nursing Young Sho’, I remembers de slavery days! I was a little gal but I can tell you lots of things about dem days. My job was nussing de younguns. I took keer of them from daylight to dark. I’d have to sing them to sleep too. I’d sing: By-lo Baby Bunting Daddy’s gone a-hunting To get a rabbit skin To wrap Baby Bunting in.” Sometimes I’d sing: Rock-a-bye baby, in a tree top When de wind blows your cradle’ll rock. When de bough breaks de crad’ll fall Down comes baby cradle’n all.” My father was Jackson Longacre and he was born in Mississippi. My mother, Caroline, was born in South Carolina. Both of them was born slaves. My father belonged to Huriah Longacre. He had a big plantation and lots of niggers. He put up a lot of his slaves as security on a debt and he took sick and died so they put them all on de block and sold them. My father and his mother (my grandma) was sold together. My old Mistress bought my grandmother and old Mistress’ sister bought my grandma’s sister. These white women agreed that they would never go off so far that the two slave women couldn’t see each other. They allus kept this promise. A Mr. Covington offered old Master...

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Biographical Sketch of Thomas Samuel McWilliams

McWilliams, Thomas Samuel; minister; born, Kentucky, Nov. 22, 1865; son of Samuel and Martha A. Harrington McWilliams; Centr. College, Danville, Ky., A. B., 1886, A. M., 1889, D. D., 1899; Danville Theological Seminary, 1886-1888; Princeton Theological Seminary, 1888-1889; married, Chillicothe, O., Dec. 5, 1887, Susan Probasco Nipgen; one son, John P. McWilliams; pastor First Presbyterian Church, Chillicothe, 0., 1889-1892; American Presbyterian Church, Montreal, Can., 1892-1902; pastor Calvary Presbyterian Church, Cleveland, since 1902; in 1911, chairman of committee that formed the Association of Federated Churches of Cleveland; pres. of Cleveland Peace Society, 1911, member Kappa Alpha Fraternity; member Mayfield, and Country Clubs. Golf favorite...

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Biography of William Lenox McWilliams

Many interests claim the time and attention of William Lenox McWilliams, a foremost citizen of Miami, who is president of the First National Bank, being also extensively interested in stock raising and mining, and he is likewise one of the leaders of the republican party in Oklahoma. He was born upon a farm near La Belle, Missouri, April 29, 1865, his parents being George Washington and Lucy M. (Clapp) McWilliams, and is a representative of an old American family, his ancestors having been passengers on the Mayflower. The father fought in the Civil war and gave up his life for his country. He was a native of Hardin county, Kentucky, while the mother was born in Lewis county, Missouri. William L. McWilliams, the only son in the family, spent his boyhood upon the home farm and attended the common schools near La Belle, while later he entered Western Academy, through which he worked his way. For a year he taught school at Ravenna, Nebraska, after which he was employed by an implement house there, and then became a student at the Louisville (Ky.) Medical College, from which he was graduated with the class of 1891. For three months he followed his profession at Melrose, Kansas, and in June, 1891, he located at Miami, becoming the pioneer physician here. He secured from the Miami Townsite Company the first deed ever...

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Biography of Robert J. McWilliams

ROBERT J. McWILLIAMS. – Robert J. McWilliams has been for many years identified with the pioneer business interests of Oregon, particularly in the line of lumbering and preparing materials for the construction of steamboats. He was born in New York in 1825, and in 1839 emigrated to Michigan, where he assisted his father in opening out a farm, and after the age of twenty entered upon the business of lumbering, with which he remained until 1850, when he crossed the plains to California, and remained until his trip overland to Milwaukee, Oregon, in 1851. At that young city, then a rival of Portland, he leased the sawmill of Lot Whitcomb, and subsequently that of Collins & Torrence, opposite Milwaukee, which was run by steam. His lumber sold readily at from forty to fifty dollars per thousand, and laths at sixteen dollars. In 1854 he erected and furnished at Mlwaukee the Veranda Hotel at a cost of fourteen thousand dollars, the best then in Oregon. In 1856 he worked for or in the sawmill of Bradford & Company at the Cascades for four years, and sawed the lumber for the steamer Hassalo, long known on the Columbia, and also prepared the planking for the bottom of the steamer Colonel Wright, built for the Upper Columbia traffic. In 1857 he was married to Miss Olive W., daughter of Lot Whitcomb, who...

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