Surname: McNeill

Biography of William S. McNeill

William S. McNeill was born in Hardy county, Virginia, November 1, 1837. His parents moved to this county in 1855, and his father, John H. McNeill, was president of the first fair held in this county in 1856, and had at that time the only herd of Short-Horn Durham cattle in northwest Missouri. When the war began his father raised a company of cavalry for the Confederate army, and died November 11, 1864, from a wound received in the Shenandoah Valley, Virginia, while at the head of his company, known as the Partisan Rangers. The command then fell to his son Jesse, brother of William S. McNeill, who with sixty men executed one of the most daring feats of the late war. Going into the Union lines at Cumberland, in Maryland, where there were 10,000 Union soldiers, he went to the hotel where Generals Crook and Kelley were sleeping, went to to their rooms, took them prisoners, and got them safe within his own lines. He rode ninety miles in twenty-four hours in performing the deed. William S. McNeill was educated in the common schools, supplemented by a ten months term at the State University, at Columbia, Missouri. He enlisted at the beginning of the war in his father’s company and served eight months, then returned home and served eight months in the Enrolled State Militia. In 1875 he...

Read More

Slave Narrative of John C. Bectom

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: John C. Bectom Location: North Carolina Date of Birth: Oct. 7, 1862 My name is John C. Bectom. I was born Oct. 7, 1862, near Fayetteville, Cumberland County, North Carolina. My father’s name was Simon Bectom. He was 86 years of age when he died. He died in 1910 at Fayetteville, N. C. My mother’s name was Harriet Bectom. She died in 1907, May 23, when she was seventy years old. My brother’s were named Ed, Kato and Willie. I was third of the boys. My sisters were Lucy, Anne and Alice. My father first belonged to Robert Wooten of Craven County, N. C. Then he was sold by the Wootens to the Bectoms of Wayne County, near Goldsboro, the county seat. My mother first belonged to the McNeills of Cumberland County. Miss Mary McNeill married a McFadden, and her parents gave my mother to Mis’ Mary. Mis’ Mary’s daughter in time married Ezekial King and my mother was then given to her by Mis’ Mary McFadden, her mother. Mis’ Lizzie McFadden became a King. My grandmother was named Lucy Murphy. She belonged to the Murpheys. All the slaves were given off to the children of the family as they married. My father and mother told me stories of how they were treated at different places. When my grandmother was with the Murpheys...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Josephine Ann Barnett

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Location: De Valls Bluff, Arkansas Age: 75 or 80 “I do not knows my exact age. I judge I somewhere between 75 and 80 years old. I was born close to Germantown, Tennessee. We belong, that is my mother, to Phillip McNeill and Sally McNeill. My mother was a milker. He had a whole heap of hogs, cattle and stock. That not all my mother done. She plowed. Children done the churnin’. “The way it all come bout I was the onliest chile my mother had. Him and Miss Sallie left her to help gather the crop and they brought me in the buggy wid them. I set on a little box in the foot of the buggy. It had a white umbrella stretched over it. Great big umbrella run in between them. It was fastened to the buggy seat. When we got to Memphis they loaded the buggy on the ship. I had a fine time coming. When we got to Bucks Landing we rode to his place in the buggy. It is 13 miles from here (De Valls Bluff). In the fall nearly all his slaves come out here. Then when my mother come on. I never seen my papa after I left back home [TR: Crossed out: (near Germantown)]. My father belong to Boston Hack. He wouldn’t sell and Mr. McNeill wouldn’t...

Read More

Clarence McNeill

Sergt., Co. L, 119th Inf., 30th Div. Born in Hoke County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. M. C. McNeill. Entered the service at Red Springs, N.C., June 19, 1917. Was sent to Camp Stuart, Va., and from there to Camp Sevier, S. C. Transferred to Camp Merritt. Sailed for France April 17, 1918. Promoted to Corpl. 1916 and to rank of Sergt. March, 1917. Returned to USA April 2, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, April 8, 1919. Was on the Mexican border from October, 1916, to March,...

Read More

J. L. McNeill

Private Signal Corps, Co. C, 81st Div. Born in Robeson County; the son of E. D. and Mrs. Josephine McNeill. Husband of Mrs. Eula O’Neal McNeill. Entered service May 20, 1918, at Lumberton, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson. Transferred to Camp Sevier. Sailed for France Aug. 16, 1918. Fought at St. Die Sector, Verdun, St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne. Returned to USA April 4, 1919, Hoboken, N. J. Mustered out at Camp Mills April 8,...

Read More

J. M. McNeill

Private, Med. Corps, Base No. 65. Born in Scotland County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. D. C. McNeill. Entered the service at Laurinburg, N.C., June 1, 1918. Was sent to Ft. McPherson, Ga. Mustered out at Ft. McPherson, Ga., Sept. 3,...

Read More

Biography of Corbin Asahel McNeill

Corbin Asahel McNeill, brother of Edwin V. McNeill, was born in Macoupin County, Illinois, January 13, 1867, in a log cabin. He received his public school education in Cherokee County, Kansas, following which he attended the State Normal School, at Fort Scott, and became a telegraph operator, a vocation which he followed for a short time. Mr. McNeill read law in the offices of Ritter & Wiswell, attorneys at Columbus, and was admitted to the bar in 1892, and two years later had so favorably impressed himself upon the people that he was elected county attorney, an office in which he served one term. He also served one term as a member of the State Board of Charities, under the administration of Governor W. J. Bailey. Mr. McNeill has had a general civil and criminal practice, and has one of the largest clienteles in this part of the state. He was appointed by Governor Hoch as judge of the District Court, to fill out an unexpired term, and was subsequently elected to that office in 1906 and served four years more. Judge McNeill is a republican. Fraternally, he is affiliated with St. Paul (Kansas) Council, Knights of Columbus; Galena Lodge No. 677, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; Galena Aerie of the Fraternal Order of Eagles; and the Loyal Order of Moose, Modern Woodmen of America, Ancient Order of...

Read More

Biography of Mrs. Nancy J. McNeill

Mrs. Nancy J. McNeill. While the professional career of Mrs. Nancy J. McNeill has covered but a short period of time, she has already demonstrated her right to a place among the learned members of the Cherokee County bar, and, as junior partner of the firm of Skidmore & McNeill, at Columbus, has built up a large and representative practice. Mrs. McNeill was born near the Town of Messer, in Cherokee County, Kansas, and is a daughter of Branche and Mary M. (Fowler) Jones, and a descendant of revolutionary ancestors on both sides of the family. The Jones family originated in Wales, and members thereof were found in Virginia during colonial times. Branche Jones was born in Eastern Tennessee, in 1859, and came to Kansas in 1883, settling in Cherokee County, where for a number of years he was engaged in farming and also was employed as a stationary engineer. He is now retired from active pursuits and makes his home with Mrs. McNeill. He is a republican in politics and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Jones married Mary M. Fowler, who was also born in 1859, in Eastern Tennessee, and to this union there were born two children: Lulu, who died at the age of twenty-seven years as the wife of John Zimmerman, a coal miner of Pittsburg, Kansas; and Nancy Jane. Nancy Jane Jones...

Read More

Biography of Alexander McNeill

Alexander McNeill, farmer, was a son of Alexander and Nancy (Montgomery) Mc-Neill, and was born in Ireland March 10, 1808. The first twenty-six years of his life he spent in his native land. In 1834 he emigrated to America, landing in Philadelphia. Thence, two months later, went to Paris, Bourbon County, Kentucky, where, upon letters of introduction from his uncles in the old country, he obtained a situation as clerk in a cotton establishment. After a year he accepted a position as clerk in a dry goods store at Owensville, Bath County, Kentucky, where he remained six years, then sold goods on his own account in the same town, having been saving and diligent during his seven years’ clerkship, which enabled him to engage in business for himself. Owing to ill health, after about four years in mercantile pursuits, he bought a large farm in Bath County, Kentucky, and began farming, which has been his principal pursuit since. It is proper to here note the causes which induced his removal from Kentucky to Illinois. Soon after coming to America he became a Whig, then a Republican and the breaking out of the Civil war found him a Union man: Bath County, his home, was the constant scene of guerrilla war-fare, and men like Mr. McNeill lived in a state of constant jeopardy. In 1863 his home was invaded by...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest