Surname: McCoy

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

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Establishment of Fort Gibson in 1824

By Act of Congress of March 2, 1819, Arkansas Territory was established July 4, embracing substantially all of what are now the states of Arkansas and Oklahoma; though the civil government of Arkansas Territory was limited to that section lying east of the Osage line, divided into counties, and embracing approximately the present state of Arkansas. That west of the Osage line was the Indian country, and in later years became known as Indian Territory. James Miller 1James Miller was born in Peterboro, N. H., April 25, 1776; entered the array as major in 1808, became Lieutenant-colonel in 1810,...

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Brookfield Massachusetts Warnings 1737-1788

In the following information all the names, dates and other essential particulars which appear in the returns to the Court in the County of Worcester during the entire period – a full half-century, from 1737 to 1788 – in which these entries were made, are given. The returns from each place have been brought together and arranged under the name of the town or district, in this case Brookfield Massachusetts.

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History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa

History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa together with sketches of their cities, villages and townships, educational, civil, military and political history; portraits of prominent persons, and 641 biographies of representative citizens. Also included is a history of Iowa embracing accounts of the pre-historic races, and a brief review of its civil and military history.

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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Melville Township

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Anderson, L. A. Wf. Mathilda; ch.Emmert and Lucile. P. O. Audubon, R. 3. O. 160 ac., sec. 36. (18.) Breeder of Poland China Hogs. Andresen, Christ. Wf. Hansena; ch. Mary, Nina, Emil, Estra, Hu1ga and Hannah. P. O. Audubon,R. 3. R. 240 ac., sec. 26. (22.) Owner, H. M. McClanahan. Andrews, James. Wf. Allie; ch. Lois and Harvey. P. O. Audubon, R. 3. O. 160 ac., sec. 28. (37.) Breeder of Poland China Hogs and Holstein Cattle. Arts, John N....

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Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Isabella M’coy – Indian Captivities

Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Isabella M’coy, who was taken Captive at Epsom, N. H., in the Year 1747. Collected From the Recollections of Aged People who knew her, by the Rev. Jonathan Curtis, a Minister of that Town, about Seventeen Years ago, and by Him Communicated to the Publishers of the New Hampshire Historical Collections. The Indians were first attracted to the new settlements in the town of Epsom, N. H., by discovering M’Coy at Suncook, now Pembroke. This, as nearly as can be ascertained, was in the year 1747. Reports were spread of the depredations of the Indians in various places; and M’Coy had heard that they had been seen lurking about the woods at Penacook, now Concord. He went as far as Pembroke; ascertained that they were in the vicinity; was somewhere discovered by them, and followed home. They told his wife, whom they afterwards made prisoner, that they looked through cracks around the house, and saw what they had for supper that night. They however did not discover themselves till the second day after. They probably wished to take a little time to learn the strength and preparation of the inhabitants. The next day, Mrs. M’Coy, attended by their two dogs, went down to see if any of the other families had returned from the garrison. She found no one. On her return, as...

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Treaty of February 11, 1837

The said bands assent to the provisions of the treaties concluded on Aug. 5 and Sept 23, 1836, in which were ceded to the U.S. certain lands in the State of Indiana reserved for said bands by the treaties of Oct 26 and 27 1832, and hereby cede to the U.S. all their interest in said lands and agree to remove to a country that may be provided for them by the President of the U.S., SW of the Missouri river, within two years from the ratification of this treaty.

The U.S. agree to convey by patent to the Potawatomies of Indiana a tract of country, on the Osage river SW of the Missouri river sufficient in extent and adapted to their habits and wants.

The U.S. agree to purchase the “five sections in the prairie, near Rock Village” reserved for Qui-qui-to in the second article of the treaty of October 20th 1832 for the sum of $4,000.

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Slave Narrative of James Lucas

Person Interviewed: James Lucas Location: Natchez Mississippi Place of Residence: Natchez, Adams County MS Date of Birth: October 11, 1833 James Lucas, ex-slave of Jefferson Davis, lives at Natchez, Adams County. Uncle Jim is small, wrinkled, and slightly stooped. His woolly hair is white, and his eyes very bright. He wears a small grizzled mustache. He is always clean and neatly dressed. “Miss, you can count up for yo’se’f. I was born on October 11, 1833. My young Marster give me my age when he heired de prope’ty of his uncle, Marse W.B. Withers. He was a-goin’ through de papers an’ a-burnin’ some of ’em when he foun’ de one ’bout me. Den he says, ‘Jim, dissen’s ’bout you. It gives yo’ birthday.’ “I recollec’ a heap’ bout slav’ry-times, but I’s all by myse’f now. All o’ my frien’s has lef’ me. Even Marse Fleming has passed on. He was a little boy when I was a grown man. “I was born in a cotton fiel’ in cotton pickin’ time, an’ de wimmins fixed my mammy up so she didn’ hardly lose no time at all. My mammy sho’ was healthy. Her name was Silvey an’ her mammy come over to dis country in a big ship. Somebody give her de name o’ Betty, but twant her right name. Folks couldn’ un’erstan’ a word she say. It was some...

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Biographical Sketch of George McCoy

(See Downing) Major Downing, an officer in the British army, married a full blood Cherokee woman of the Wolf Clan and their daughter, Nannie, married McSwain. Their daughter, Elizabeth McSwain, married David Welch and they were the parents of Elizabeth, George Washington and Sidney Welch. Elizabeth Welch, born November 11, 1811, married Joshua Buffington, Isaac Ragsdale, Nix and Moses Alberty. George Washington Welch married Margaret Jones. He died March 20, 1840, and she died July 26, 1851. Elizabeth Welch had no children by her marriage with Nix and her children by her other three marriages were: Nannie Buffington, David Welch and Winnie Jane Ragsdale; Eli Snow and George Washington Alberty. George Washington and Margaret (Jones) Welch’s children were: David, born September 15, 1819; Lemuel Bruenton, born September 15, 1824; Sidney, born July 9, 1827; Diana, born June 9, 1831; Margaret Ann, born December 17, 1832; George, born July 2 , 1837, and Rosanna Welch, born in May, 1840. David Welch married Harriette Elizabeth Smithwick. Lemuel Bruenton Welch married Mary Ann Harris; Sidney Welch married Prince Albert Carnes, and John Wilkey. Diana Welch married Joseph Henry Carnes. Margaret Ann Welch married William Green Ward. George Welch married Nannie Jones. Rosanna Welch married McCoy and their children were: Julia Ann, George, John William, James Willis, Elizabeth, Lucinda, Sailie and lda McCoy. Julia McCoy married William Oscar Ames. George McCoy married Victoria...

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Biography of John McCoy

JOHN MCCOY (deceased). All people of true sensibility, who have a just regard for the memory of those who have departed this life, cherish the details of the history of men, whose careers have been marked by uprightness and truth and whose lives have been filled up with acts of usefulness. It is, therefore, with gratification that we present to our readers a sketch of John McCoy, whose life in this county has been such as to make his memory justly respected. He was a native of that grand old Mother of States, Virginia, his birth occurring in 1799. When about two years of age he was taken by his parents to east Tennessee, where he was reared in the then wild country, with-out the advantages of an education, just merely learning to read. He was married in Hawkins County, Tennessee, and made his home there until 1841, when he came by wagon to what is now Christian County, being six weeks and two days in making the journey. He at once purchased a portion of the present home, having sixteen or seventeen acres in cultivation, upon which was a rude log cabin. This was about three miles southeast of Ozark, and there Mr. McCoy improved a good farm and spent the remainder of his days, until his death in 1875. For many years he operated a distillery, and...

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Slave Narrative of George Pretty

Interviewer: Viola B. Muse Person Interviewed: George Pretty Location: Vero Beach and Gifford, Florida Age: 84 George Pretty of Vero Beach and Gifford, Florida, was born a free man, at Altoona, Pennsylvania, January 30, 1852. His father Isaac Pretty was also free born. His maternal grand-father Alec McCoy and his paternal grand-father George Pretty were born slaves who lived in the southern part of Pennsylvania. He does not know how his father came to be born free but knows that he was told that from early childhood. In Altoona, according to George, there were no slaves during his life there but in southern Pennsylvania slavery existed for a time. His grand-parents moved from southern Pennsylvania during slavery but whether they bought their freedom or ran away from their masters was never known to George. As in most of the southland, the customs of the Negro in Altoona abounded in superstition and ignorance. They had about the same beliefs and looked upon life with about the same degree of intelligence as Negroes in the south. The north being much colder than the south naturally had long ago used coal for fuel. Open grates were used for cooking just as open fireplaces were used in the south. Iron skillets or spiders as they called them, were used for cooking many foods, meats, vegetables, pies puddings and even cakes were baked over...

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Biography of James L. McCoy

James L. McCoy has for many years been identified with the lumber industry both in Kansas and Arkansas, and manages his extensive interests from his home and headquarters at Coffeyville. Nearly all his active career has been spent in the West and in the early days of Oklahoma he went there as a pioneer and opened a farm. James L. McCoy was born in Atchison County, Missouri, May 21, 1862. Four generations of the McCoys have lived in this country, having come originally from Scotland, and the family were early settlers in the State of Ohio. Mr. McCoy’s grandfather, Andrew Cartwright, who was born in Maryland and followed farming in Ohio, was a consin of Peter Cartwright, the famous Methodist evangelist of the early days in Southern Ohio and other states. William McCoy, father of James L., was born in Pike County, Ohio, in 1836, and died at Coffeyville in 1905. He came out to Kansas and located at Coffeyville in 1886, and for many years was in the general merchandise business with store at the corner of Eighth and Walnut streets. He built the fine business block known as the McCoy or Junction Building at the corner of Eighth and Walnut streets. That building is still included in his estate, as are also two dwelling houses, one at 601 Willow Street and another at Third and Union streets....

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Olds, George R. – Obituary

Enterprise, Wallowa County, Oregon George R. Olds died on January 22, 1988 at the Veterans Medical Center in Portland. He was born February 15, 1924 at Buffalo, Wyo., son of George and Agnes (Anderson) Olds. On May 7, 1950 he was married to Helen Hollas at Billings, Montana. He was a lineman for Pacific Power and Light. Survivors include his wife, Helen of Enterprise; on son, Donald Olds of Fountain Green , Utah; four daughters, Sharon Price of Milton-Freewater, Patsy Reynolds of Anchorage, Alaska, Nancy Lathrop of La Grande and Shelley Curtis of Baker; and 12 grandchildren. Memorial services were held at Bollman Funeral Home on Jan. 25, with Lester Wells officiating. Those who wish may make memorial contributions to the Heart Fund in care of Bollman Funeral Home, Main at West 3rd, Enterprise. Source: Wallowa County Chieftain, Enterprise, Oregon, Thursday, February 4, 1988 Contributed by: Sue Wells Transcribed by: Dixie...

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