Surname: Mayer

Index to Articles found in the El Farol Newspaper 1905-1906

The Lincoln County New Mexico online archives contains pdf’s of all remaining copies of the El Farol Newspaper of Capitan NM, but doesn’t have an index to the newspaper. C. W. Barnum, an active member of AHGP, and state coordinator for the New Mexico AHGP recently invested his time and energy into providing an every person index to the various extant issues. He has shared this wonderful index with AccessGenealogy in hopes that it will reach a wider audience. Enjoy!

Read More

1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

Read More

Slave Narrative of Chaney Mayer

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Belle Butler Location: Indiana Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE MRS. BELLE BUTLER-DAUGHTER [of Chaney Mayer] 829 North Capitol Avenue Interviewer’s Comment Belle Butler, the daughter of Chaney Mayer, tells of the hardships her mother endured during her days of slavery. Interview Chaney was owned by Jesse Coffer, “a mean old devil.” He would whip his slaves for the slightest misdemeanor, and many times for nothing at all-just enjoyed seeing them suffer. Many a time Jesse would whip a slave, throw him down, and gouge his eyes out. Such a cruel act! Chaney’s sister was also a slave on the Coffer plantation. One day their master decided to whip them both. After whipping them very hard, he started to throw them down, to go after their eyes. Chaney grabbed one of his hands, her sister grabbed his other hand, each girl bit a finger entirely off of each hand of their master. This, of course, hurt him so very bad he had to stop their punishment and never attempted to whip them again. He told them he would surely put them in his pocket (sell them) if they ever dared to try *anthing like that again in life. Not so long after their fight, Chaney was given to a daughter of their master, and...

Read More

Biography of Hans E. Mayer

That he had authoritative knowledge of the details of the life-insurance business and is also an able execntive needs no further voucher than the statement that Mr. Mayer holds the responsible office of manager of the Missouri State Life Insurance Company for the State of Kansas. He maintains his administrative headquarters and his residence at Wichita and is one of the popular and progressive citizens of this vigorous city of the Sunflower State. Mr. Mayer was born in Coblentz, Germany, and in the excellent schools of his native place he acquired his early education, which was supplemented by a higher course of study in the Christian Brothers’ College in Belgium. He was a lad of sixteen years when he accompanied his parente on their immigration to America, and the family home was established in the City of Topeka, Kansas, where the subject of this review continued his studies in the public schools, further showed his ambition by attending night schools also and eventually by the completion of a thorough course in the Standard Shorthand School of Topeka, from which he received a diploma. As a skilled bookkeeper he was employed in the office of his uncle, in Topeka, until 1898, in which year he initiated his specially successful career in connection with the life-insurance business. He went to the City of St. Louis, Missouri, where he remained until 1903,...

Read More

Biograhical Sketch of Frank Blackwell Mayer

Frank Blackwell Mayer, born in Baltimore, Maryland, December 27, 1827; died in 1908. Many of his paintings represented scenes in Indian life, and in 1886 he completed a canvas entitled The Treaty of Traverse des Sioux, the treaty having been signed during the summer of 1851, about the time the sketch of Kaposia was...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Joel Mayer

Well known at Oilton and in Creek county is Mrs. Joel Mayer, who was born in Ramona, Oklahoma, on the 6th of February, 1900. She is a daughter of Reuben Bartlett and Roxie Ann (Pierson) Tuner. The former was one of the well to do old settlers of Oklahoma, important in the tribal affairs of his people in the early days, and the family has long been represented in this section of the state. The daughter, Mrs. Mayer, pursued her education in St. Francis Convent at Nevada, Missouri, and then returned to her home in Oklahoma, having since been a resident of this city. She was a young woman of but nineteen years when on the 17th of February, 1920, at Sapulpa, Oklahoma, she became the wife of Joel Mayer. She bore the maiden name of Maudine Mae Tyner and by her marriage has become the mother of an interesting little son, Joel B. Mayer, Jr. Mrs. Mayer has always lived in Oklahoma save for the period of her attendance at school in Missouri, having a very wide and popular acquaintance...

Read More

Biography of Carl F. Mayer

In the sudden demise of Carl F. Mayer, which occurred at Joplin, Missouri, on the 19th of September, 1921, when he was fifty years of age, Miami lost one of its most progressive, public-spirited and highly respected citizens and the government a trusted official whose entire active life had been spent in its service. The place which he left vacant will be a difficult one to fill, for broad experience had given him a comprehensive understanding of Indian affairs, and the service which he rendered was one of great value to the nation. He was born at Leavenworth, Kansas, August 7, 1871, and was a son of Henry and Emma (Roehrig) Mayer, the former born at Kirkheim in the province of Teck, Germany, while the latter was a native of Minersville, Pennsylvania. When a youth of fifteen years the father came alone to the United States, making his way to Pottsville, Pennsylvania, where he followed the barber’s trade. He then joined the regular army and in 1859 went overland to California with his regiment, which built Fort Humboldt in that state during the pioneer epoch in its development. Following the outbreak of the Civil war Henry Mayer returned to the east by way of Cape Horn and participated in several important engagements during that conflict. At the close of the war he received his discharge from the service and...

Read More

Search

Subscribe to AccessGenealogy

Enter your email address to subscribe to AccessGenealogy and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 5,332 other subscribers

It takes a Village to grow a Family Tree!


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Recent Comments

Subscribe to AccessGenealogy

Enter your email address to subscribe to AccessGenealogy and receive notifications of new posts and databases by email.

Join 5,332 other subscribers

Pin It on Pinterest