Surname: Martin

Ralph Bacon Genealogy

The Bacon Family Genealogy descends the Bacon family tree through the children of Ralph Bacon, 2nd. Ralph was born in New York State abt the year 1777. At the age of 17, about the year 1794, he traveled to Painesville Ohio. Eventually acquiring some land there, he would marry Mary Jourden in 1801. In 1820 he moved his family to Crawford County, Ohio, owning houses and land in the townships of Liberty and Whetstone. His wife died 5 Oct 1845, he died 15 Jun 1849. This union would produce 13 offspring, twelve of whom would marry and raise families of their own. This Bacon Family Genealogy is their story.

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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Claybank Cemetery Ozark Alabama

Margaret Claybank Cemetery is located about two miles from Ozark, Alabama on Ozark – Daleville Highway. This cemetery enumeration was performed in 1948 by Eustus Hayes and as such will provide details on headstones which may no longer be present in the cemetery. Lizzie E. Dowling June 25, 1853 – Oct 31, 1938. Wife of N. B. Dowling. N. B. Dowling Aug 15, 1853 – Mar 28, 1938. Hus of Lizzie E. Dowling. Leila Belle Dowling May 26, 1876 – Jan 14, 1933. Dau of S. L. & Sarah Jane Dowling. Samuel L. Dowling Nov 3, 1841 – Jan...

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The Discovery Of This Continent, it’s Results To The Natives

In the year 1470, there lived in Lisbon, a town in Portugal, a man by the name of Christopher Columbus, who there married Dona Felipa, the daughter of Bartolome Monis De Palestrello, an Italian (then deceased), who had arisen to great celebrity as a navigator. Dona Felipa was the idol of her doting father, and often accompanied him in his many voyages, in which she soon equally shared with him his love of adventure, and thus became to him a treasure indeed not only as a companion but as a helper; for she drew his maps and geographical charts, and...

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Narrative of Mrs. Clendenin – Indian Captivities

Narrative of the Destruction of the Settlement of Green-Brier, Virginia, together with the capture and surprising conduct of Mrs. Clendenin, who was among those Who Escaped the Tomahawk of the Indians at that Massacre. 1Whether the following narrative was ever in print, except as it stands in Mr. Martin’s Gazetteer of Virginia, I have never learned. It would seem from the following note accompanying it in that work, “that it was extracted from memoirs of Indian wars on the western frontiers of Virginia, communicated to the Philosophical Society of Virginia, by Charles A. Stuart, Esq., of Augusta Co.” Ed. After peace was confirmed between England and France in the year 1761, the Indians commenced hostilities in 1763, 2 Hostilities had not ceased between the whites and the Indians, as will be seen by a reference to the Chronicles of the Indians for this and the preceding years. Ed.  when all the inhabitants in Greenbrier were totally cut off by a party of Indians, headed by the chief warrior Cornstalk. 3 The life and barbarous death of this great chief are given at length in the Book of the Indians, v. 42, 44. Ed  The principal settlements were on Muddy Creek. These Indians, in number about sixty, introduced themselves into the people’s houses under the mask of friendship, where every civility was offered them by the people, providing them with victuals...

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The French In Alabama And Mississippi

After the Spanish invasion of De Soto, to which allusion has so often been made, our soil remained untrodden by European feet for nearly a century and a half. At the end of that long and dark period it became connected with the history of the distant dark period it became connected with the history of the distant French possessions of Canada, which were contemporaneous with the oldest English colonies in America. For more than fifty years the French fur traders of Canada, associated with the enterprising Jesuit Fathers, had continued to advance southwestward upon the great lakes, discovering new regions, different races of Indians, more abundant game, and wider and brighter waters. At length, from the tribes upon the southern shores of Lake Superior, Father Allouez heard some vague reports of a great western river. Subsequently, Father Marquette was dispatched from Quebec with Joliet, a trader of that place, five other Frenchmen, and a large number of Indian guides, to seek the Mississippi, and thus add new regions to the dominion of France, and new missions of the empire of the Jesuits. Ascending Fox River to the head of navigation, and crossing the portage to the banks of the Wisconsin, with birch bark canoes, the adventurers again launched their tiny boats and floated down to the Mississippi river. Descending it to the mouth of the Arkansas, and encountering...

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The Spaniards in Alabama and Mississippi

England, having lost her West Florida provinces by the victories of Galvez, and having the American Whigs, as well as the natives of France, Spain and Holland, arrayed against her, was finally forced to retire from the unequal contest. A preliminary treaty of peace was signed at Paris. England there acknowledged our independence, and admitted our southern boundary to be as follows: A line beginning at the Mississippi, at 31° north of the equator, and extending due east to the Chattahoochie River; down that river to the mouth of the Flint, and thence to the St. Mary’s, and along that river to the sea. Great Britain also expressly stipulated, in that treaty, our right to the navigation of the Mississippi River, from its mouth to its source. Jan. 20 1783: Great Britain and Spain entered into a treaty. The former warranted and confirmed to the latter the province of West Florida, and ceded to her East Florida. 1American State Papers, Boston edition, vol. 10, p. 132. But although England, by the treaty of 1782, assigned to the United States all the territory between the Mississippi and the Chattahoochie, lying between the parallels of latitude 31° and 32° 28′, embracing the same portion of the territory of Alabama and Mississippi, which lay in the British province of West Florida, yet it was not surrendered to us by Spain for years...

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1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George...

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List of the Drummond Island Voyageurs

In 1828 the transfer of the British garrison from Drummond Island to Penetanguishene commenced. A list of voyageurs who resided on Drummond Island at the time of the transfer. In many cases a brief biographical sketch is contained which may provide clues to their ethnicity, family relationships, and the location where they or their ancestors settled.

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Washington County, Idaho Pioneer Honor Roll

In 1940 and 1943, a survey of everyone who had lived in Washington County, Idaho continuously for 50 years or more, was made by the Weiser American. These pioneer residents were especially honored at the Fall Festival held in the fall of both years. So far as is known, the list compiled by the survey is complete and perhaps the only record of its kind in existence.

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Biographical Sketch of Nathaniel Everett Martin

Nathaniel Everett Martin, a successful attorney and well-known business man of Concord, was born in Loudon, N.H., August 9, 1855, son of Theophilus B. and Sarah L. (Rowell) Martin. He is of Scotch-Irish blood on the paternal side, being a direct descendant of William Martin, who came to this country from Ireland about the year 1732. Landing in Boston, William Martin went thence to Londonderry, N.H., from which place he removed subsequently to Pembroke, Merrimack County. James Martin, the great-grandfather of Nathaniel E., served with the rank of Ensign during the Revolutionary War, and died before the cause of American independence was achieved. Mr. Martin’s maternal ancestors were English, and first located in Haverhill, Mass., whence Grandfather Rowell removed to Loudon, N.H. The subject of this sketch was educated in the district school of Loudon and in the public schools of Concord, completing his studies in the Concord High School at the age of twenty years. He studied law with Sargeant & Chase, was admitted to the bar August 14, 1879, and immediately began the practice of his profession. After practising alone until May, 1885, he then became associated with Mr. J. A. Albin, the partnership continuing until September, 1896, when Mr. Dewitt C. Howe was admitted to the firm. In 1887 Mr. Martin organized the Concord Building and Loan Association, of which he has since been treasurer. He...

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Biographical Sketch of Dr. John Martin

John Martin was born in Morgan county, Kentucky, February 15, 1819, and is the son of Lewis Martin, a native of Kentucky. Our subject moved with his parents to Lawrence county, Tennessee, while an infant, and lived there during fifteen years, and there received the greater part of his education. From Tennessee he moved to Illinois, and was married in Hancock county, that State, September 8, 1839. He came to this State in 1845 and has lived in various counties of Missouri since, engaged in the practice of medicine and other branches of business. He came to Jamesport about ten years ago and has built up an extensive and profitable business in grain and lumber. Dr. Martin was surgeon of the Seventh Regiment of Missouri Volunteers for a time during the Civil War. He was elected to a seat in the State Senate from Sullivan county, in 1865, by a majority of her citizens, but the election returns were so handled and such a number of voters disfranchised and their votes rejected that he was not allowed to take his seat. He has eight children: Martin T., Harriet, Edmund B., A. S., Vic., Isaiah, F. L., and Philanda. Dr. and Mrs. Martin are members of the Baptist Church. He is, also, a member of Jamesport Lodge No. 201, A. F. & A. M. He is well esteemed by all,...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. DeWitt Martin

(See Grant and Duncan) DeWitt T. Martin, born May 12, 1888 enlisted in the World War Nov. 22, 1917. Assigned to the 17th Co. of the 2nd Regiment as an air service mechanic January 27, 18. Sailed for France March 14, 1918, where his service entitled him to two gold chevrons. Returned to the United States May 29, 1919. Honorably discharged at Camp Pike June 13, 1919. Married at Carthage, Missouri, May 1, 1920, Mary Ethel daughter of I. D. and Rachel A. Boston. They are the parents of Caroline Louise Martin, born March 24, 1821. Joseph Martin of Bristol, England, settled on a plantation near Charlotteville, Albemarle County, Virginia, in the first quarter the eighteenth century. He married Susannah Childs and they were the parents of Joseph Martin, born about 1740. He was lieutenant Colonel in the American service in the Revolutionary war. He married Susannah Fields, nee Emory, a quarter-blood Cherokee, and they were the parents of John Martin, who was the first Chief Justice and first Treasurer of the Cherokee Nation. Judge John Martin was the father of Joseph Lynch Martin, whose son, John Rogers Martin was the father of DeWitt T....

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Biographical Sketch of Joel T. Martin

(See Ghigau and Rogers) Joel Thomas, son of William and Sarah Martin, born August 21, 1876, educated in Cherokee Public Schools. Married October 26, 1896, Myrtle Stephens, nee Stephenson, born April 19, 1878, in Nodaway County, Missouri. One son, William A. Martin, married in 1899, Stella, daughter Mr. and Mrs. Argentine Causdell. They the parents of: Pauline, May and George Martin. Mr. Martin is a member of the Owls fraternity. He is a farmer near Ruby. George Washington Walker married Rachel Rogers and they were the parents of Mrs. Sarah...

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