Surname: Manning

Genealogy of Elizabeth Caroline Seymour Brown

Over a period of many years Mrs. Elizabeth Caroline Seymour Brown, early member of Linares Chapter, D.A.R., collected genealogy of her forebears. It was her wish that her work be sent to the library of the National Society, Daughters of the American Revolution. This collection was painstakingly copied, with some additions and corrections, maintaining the same general form as used in the original notes. Elizabeth’s family originated in England moving to New England in the 1600’s. Her family lines involve many of the early lines in Connecticut, Massachusets, and New Hampshire. The families are arranged mostly in alphabetical order, and contain information from a simple direct line descendancy, to more elaborate genealogy.

Major families researched include: Alverson, Arms, Arnold, Ballou, Barden, Barker, Barnard, Bassett, Belden, Benedict, Betts, Blakeslee, Blanchard, Bradstreet, Brigham, Bronson, Buckmaster, Bull, Butterfield, Carpenter, Clark, Clerke, Cooke, Coombs, Cornwall, Corbin, Curitss, Dickerman, Dickson, Doolittle, Downey, Dudley, Eastman, Easton, Errington, Evarts, Fairbank, Foote, Gilbert, Goodrich, Graves, Gregory, Groves, Hale, Hand, Hall, Hawkes, Hawkins, Hills, Holmes, Hopkins, Hoyt, Huitt, Hurd, Keayne, Keene, Lockwood, Lupton, Lord, Manning, Marvin, Mayo, Merriman, Miller, Morris, Morton, Mosse, Moulton, Munger, Needham, Parker, Parkhurst, Potter, Peck, Pettiplace, Purefoy, Priest, Rusco, St John, Scofield, Seymour, Sherman, Smith, Strong, Swinnerton, Symonds, Threlkell, Thorne, Ventriss, Wade, Watson, Weed, White, and Yorke.

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Ancestors of John Richardson Bronson of Attleboro, MA

JOHN RICHARDSON BRONSON, M. D., who for over half a century was one of the best known practitioners of medicine in southern Massachusetts and part of Rhode Island, and who for upward of fifty years was a resident of Attleboro, was a native of Connecticut, born in the town of Middlebury, New Haven county, June 5, 1829, son of Garry and Maria (Richardson) Bronson.

The Bronson family was early planted in the New World. John Bronson (early of record as Brownson and Brunson) was early at Hartford. He is believed, though not certainly known, to have been one of the company who came in 1636 with Mr. Hooker, of whose church he was a member. He was a soldier in the Pequot battle of 1637. He is not named among the proprietors of Hartford in the land division of 1639; but is mentioned in the same year in the list of settlers, who by the “towne’s courtesie” had liberty “to fetch woods and keepe swine or cowes on the common.” His house lot was in the “soldiers’ field,” so called, in the north part of the old village of Hartford, on the “Neck Road” (supposed to have been given for service in the Pequot war), where he lived in 1640. He moved, about 1641 to Tunxis (Farmington) He was deputy from Farmington in May, 1651, and at several subsequent sessions, and the “constable of Farmington” in 1652. He was one of the seven pillars at the organization of the Farmington Church in 1652. His name is on the list of freemen of Farmington in 1669. He died Nov. 28, 1680.

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Ivers Family of Dedham, MA

IVERS (New Bedford family). The name Ivers seems one uncommon in New England annals and the family by no means numerous. At Dedham are fragmentary records of the Ivers family name, but nothing of an early date.

William and Gregory Ivers, brothers, appear in Boston in the early part of the eighteenth century. They are said to have come about 1720 with the pioneer Scotch settlers from the North of Ireland. William Ivers married in Boston April 28, 1724, Jane Barber, the ceremony being performed by a Presbyterian minister. Jane Ivers died at Boston in 1789; her will, made April 29, 1776, proved April 13, 1789, Capt. Job Prince, executor, mentions sons James and Thomas, probably the only ones living at the date of making the will.

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Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

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Gleanings from English Records about New England Families

The classic work often cited by more contemporaneous authors on early New England families and the records of them found within the Principal Probate Registry, Somerset House, Strand, the Public Record Office, Fetter Lane, and the British Museum, Bloomsbury, while on a visit in London during the summer and fall of 1879.

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