Surname: Magee

Descendants of Charles Howard, North Bridgewater, MA

CHARLES HOWARD, founder and president of the Howard & Poster Company, one of the largest and best known shoe manufacturing concerns in this Commonwealth, and an original promoter of the Brockton Agricultural Society, of which he is also president, is one of the foremost business men and citizens of Brockton, Plymouth Co., Mass., for over forty years continuously and prominently identified with the industrial and financial growth of that city. Mr. Howard was born Jan. 9, 1837, in North Bridgewater, now Brockton, eldest son of the late Charles and Lavina (Rounds) Howard, and a descendant of several of New...

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An Historical Sketch of the Seneca County Medical Society

At the anniversary meeting of the Seneca County Medical Society held at Waterloo, July 23, 1885, a resolution was introduced by Dr. S. R. Welles, and adopted by the Society, that a committee be appointed which should prepare biographical sketches of members of the Society from its earliest history to the present time. As a result, this manuscript was published which includes 75 biographies of the early pioneers of the Seneca County Medical Society.

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Slave Narrative of John Cameron

Person Interviewed: John Cameron Location: Jackson, Mississippi Date of Birth: 1842 John Cameron, ex-slave, lives in Jackson. He was born in 1842 and was owned by Howell Magee. He is five feet six inches tall, and weighs about 150 pounds. His general coloring is blackish-brown with white kinky hair. He is in fairly good health. “I’se always lived right here in Hinds County. I’s seen Jackson grow from de groun’ up. “My old Marster was de bes’ man in de worl’. I jus’ wish I could tell, an’ make it plain, jus’ how good him an’ old Mistis was. Marster was a rich man. He owned ’bout a thousand an’ five hund’ed acres o’ lan’ an’ roun’ a hund’ed slaves. Marster’s big two-story white house wid lightning rods standin’ all ’bout on de roof set on top of a hill. “De slave cabins, ‘cross a valley from de Big House, was built in rows. Us was ‘lowed to sing, play de fiddles, an’ have a good time. Us had plenty t’ eat and warm clo’es an’ shoes in de winter time. De cabins was kep’ in good shape. Us aint never min’ workin’ for old Marster, cause us got good returns. Dat meant good livin’ an’ bein’ took care of right. Marster always fed his slaves in de Big House. “De slaves would go early to de fiel’s an...

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Biographical Sketch of H. W. Magee

H. W. Magee, attorney at law, Mattoon; was born in Coles Co., Ill., in October, 1847; his father came from Cynthiana, Ky., and settled in Coles Co., Ill., in 1832; here he engaged in farming; he relates that his father labored a whole year for Joseph VanDeren for $96; when H. W., was 2 years of age, his father moved to the western portion of Missouri, and was there during the border troubles; in the fall of 1857, he returned with his family to Coles Co., and settled in what is known as ” Dead Man’s Grove ;” in 1872, he moved to Louisa Co., Iowa, where he at present resides; having obtained a good common-school education, at the age of 20 years, H. W. entered the office of the Circuit Clerk, at Charleston, as Deputy; here he remained about two and a half years; in the winter of 1869, he entered the law department of Michigan University, from which he graduated in the spring of 1872; at that date, he was admitted to practice in the courts of Michigan, and, the summer of 1872, was admitted to the courts of Illinois; he began the practice of his profession in Mattoon, his present residence. He was married in the spring of 1873 to Ellen J. Barnes, a native of Indianapolis; has one...

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Biography of Stephen R. Magee, M. D.

Stephen R. Magee, M. D. Among the representative orange groves and vineyards of Arlington in Riverside, mention should be made of that owned by D. Magee. The improvements on this place were commenced by Mrs. Magee in August, 1875. It was then a wild and barren plain. Mrs. Magee in that year preceded the Doctor to California and located on a forty-acre tract, on what is now the corner of Center and Palm avenues. She caused a small cottage to be erected, in which herself and children were domiciled, and then at once commenced the planting of ornamental trees and shrubbery and flowers, and as soon as the ground could be cleared, entered into horticultural pursuits by planting citrus and deciduous trees and vines. The Doctor arrived in 1876 and found that his energetic wife had made rapid progress. He entered heartily into the improvements, and soon laid the foundation to one of the finest properties in the colony. He found his acreage more than he could devote the proper care and cultivation desired and later sold off all but twenty acres. He has now sixteen acres in oranges, about equally divided in seedlings and budded fruit, and four acres in vineyard, devoted to Muscat raisin grapes. Both the Doctor and his wife are thorough horticulturists, and as illustrative of their success in orange growing it is noted that...

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