Surname: Lynch

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

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Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

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The Settlers of Narraguagus Valley Maine

A glance at the map of the western part of Washington County will show that any treatment of the early settlement upon the Narraguagus River, necessarily involves more or less of the histories of Steuben, Milbridge, Harrington and Cherryfield. Steuben was formerly township “No. 4, East of Union River,” and No. 5 comprised the territory now included in the towns of Milbridge and Harrington. The town of Cherryfield is composed of No. 11, Middle Division, Brigham Purchase, and of the northeastern part of what was formerly Steuben. All that part of Cherryfield lying south of the mills on the...

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1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East...

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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Indian Hostilities in California and New Mexico – Indian Wars

In New Mexico, which became a part of the United States territory at the same time as California, the Indians are numerous and far more formidable than those farther west. The Apache Indians and Navajo Indians are the most powerful tribes west of the Mississippi. Being strong, active, and skillful, war is their delight, and they were the terror of the New Mexicans before the territory was occupied by the United States troops. The Pueblo Indians are among the best and most peaceable citizens of New Mexico. They, early after the Spanish conquest, embraced the forms of religion and the manners and customs of their then more civilized masters. The Pimos and Maricopos are peaceable tribes who cultivate the ground and endeavor to become good citizens. They are much exposed to the irresistible attacks of the Apache Indians and Navajo Indians, and, very often, the fruits of their honest toil become the plunder of those fierce wanderers.

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Abstracts of Wills on File in the City of New York Surrogate’s Office 1660-1680

Abstracts of wills on file in the surrogate’s office city of New York 1660-1680. From May 1787 to the present, county surrogate’s courts have recorded probates. However, the court of probates and court of chancery handled estates of deceased persons who died in one county but who owned property in another. An 1823 law mandated that all probates come under the jurisdiction of the county surrogate’s courts. Each surrogate’s court has a comprehensive index to all probate records, including the unrecorded probate packets. Interestingly enough, there are wills existing and on record at the Surrogate’s Office in New York City for the time-span of 1660-1680. Genealogical extracts of these wills have been provided below.

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Biographical Sketch of Joseph Martin Lynch

(See Grant and Adair)-Joseph Martin Lynch, born July 30, 1881, educated in Male Seminary and Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tennessee, graduating from the Law Department of the latter, but refused to take the Tennessee bar examination because Negroes were included in the class. Elected Register of Deeds of Adair County, September 17, 1807. He married Hazel Capitola Mason. He served for several years as attorney for the Interior Department and on November 8, 1919, refused the appointment of Register of the United States Treasury, because it would be impossible for him to take his aged father from his home and friends and he would not leave him. Mr. Lynch’s great-great-grandfather, Joseph Martin, a native of Albermarle County, Virginia, was elected Major in the Revolutionary Army, February 17, 1779, and promoted to a Lieutenant Colonelcy in March, 1781. He was elected Brigadier General of the North Carolina militia, December 15, 1787, and was commissioned Brigadier General of the 20th Brigade of Virginia militia by Governor “Light Horse Harry” Lee on December 11, 1793. His son John Martin, was a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1827, and was the first Chief Justice and first treasurer of the Cherokee Nation. Mr. Lynch’s grandfather, Joseph Martin Lynch, was a delegate from the Cherokee Nation to Washington in 1839, and was elected Senator from Delaware District August 2, 1842. Mr. Lynch’s father, Cicero Leonidas...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Georgia Lynch

(See Grant and Foreman) Joseph Vann generally called Joe married Polly Black, and they were the parents of William, David, Sofia, Johnson Sallie and Delilah Vann. David Vann married Nancy Tally, nee Mackey, and they were the parents of William, Joseph, George B., Robert P., and Maud May Vann. William Vann was the father of Georgia Eulalia Vann, born September 17, 1876. She was educated in Canadian District and the Female Seminary. She married March 20, 1T98, Joseph Johnson, son of Joseph Martin and Susan Francis (Foreman) Lynch, born September 29, 1875. He graduated from the Male Seminary in 1896, and died June 1, 1921. They were the parents of Cherokee Rose Lynch, and Jess Vann...

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Biography of John Lynch

One of the very few men now living in this part of the county of Peel, that were here in 1820, is John Lynch, who is two years older than this century, being born in Goreham, Vermont, November 9, 1798. His father, David Lynch, who was from Cork, Ireland, moved from the State of New York into Canada in 1813, settling near Cornwall. John received but little mental drill in school; at twenty-one years of age came into what is now the county of Peel, took up land in the 2nd concession east, in the township of Chinguacousy, about one mile from where Brampton now stands, and with his own axe opened a farm. At that time bears and wolves were much more numerous than people, particularly whites; partridges and other wild fowl were exceedingly plentiful, and the mosquitoes no man, no thousand men, could number. Mr. Lynch farmed until about 1832, when he moved to Toronto, where he was in the brewing business with other parties a few years, returning to the county of Peel, and farming a few more seasons, and starting a brewery in Brampton about 1839. He abandoned the brewery business about twenty-five years ago, and after being a real estate agent and conveyancer a few years, retired from manual labor. Mr. Lynch was appointed a justice of the peace nearly fifty years ago, and...

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Biographical Sketch of Walter W. Lynch

Walter W. Lynch is of the firm of W.W. Lynch & Co., upholsters and repairers of all kinds of furniture, manufacturers of the self-adjusting spring bed, and agents for the American bird call, for which articles agents are wanted. The firms are also agents for a number of periodicals. Mr. Lynch was born in N.Y. in 1850; came west and engaged in railroading until he came to this city in 1881. He married Mary A....

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Biographical Sketch of Bert E. Lynch

Bert E. Lynch has made his career one of fruitful endeavor amid the scenes and associations of his early childhood and youth. He is leading a very active and enterprising life as a farmer in Sidney Township, and has a well ordered farm and good country home on Rural Route No. 57. Mr. Lynch was born in section 14 of Sidney Township, March 17, 1870, a son of William F. and Cynthia E. (Lunger) Lynch, both of whom were natives of Indiana. His father came to Champaign County in the fall of 1862 and located his cabin home on section 14 of Sidney Township. In the course of years he converted a large section of prairie land into fertile fields, and spent his last years with ample comforts after making a generous provision for those dependent upon his labors. He and his wife are now deceased, his death occurring September 3, 1902. They had five children: Greeley I., living in southwest Missouri; Ida M., wife of Camuel Stewart of Philo, Champaign County; Emma of Sidney; Bert E.; and Etta of Sullivan, Illinois. Bert E. Lynch remained a factor at the homestead until he was twenty-one and in the meantime secured a substantial education from the district schools. He had become a farmer on his own account before reaching his majority and has gone steadily ahead in this vocation until...

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