Surname: Lucas

Descendants of Benjamin S. Atwood of Whitman, MA

Benjamin S. Atwood, the well-known box manufacturer of Whitman, Mass., was one of the best known men in Plymouth county, and as a business man and as a soldier stood high in the estimation of all who know him. He was born in the town of Carver, Plymouth county, June 25, 1840. The Atwood family of which Benjamin S. Atwood is a descendant is an old and prominent family of Plymouth Colony. The founder was John Wood, who came to Plymouth in 1643, and was later known as John Atwood – a spelling of the name that has been retained to the present time.

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1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

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1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East...

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Genealogy of Jacob Stoneburner

On 23 September 1752 Jacob and Martin Stoneburner, possibly brothers, came to America on board the ship St. Andrew from Rotterdam to Philadelphia. Both of them were over the age of 16. Jacob early moved to Berks County, Pennsylvania where in 1767 he owned thirty acres, had one horse, one cow, two sheep. It was probably there that he married Anna Eva sometime before August 1758. Johann Adam Eva had come from Rotterdam to Philadelphia, 20 October 1754 on the ship Halifax. This Eva was possibly related to the Anna who married Jacob Stoneburner. There in Berks County, Jacob and Anna became members of the St. Joseph’s Union Church at Oley Hill which is east of present day Reading, Pennsylvania. By 1782 Jacob and his two older sons were residents of Loudoun County, Virginia, according to an early tax list. In Virginia Jacob and Anna became members of the New Jerusalem Lutheran Church at Lovettsville. However, the Shelburne Parish in Loudoun County, Virginia showed Jacob Stoneburner on the tax table list of 1771. Both Jacob and Anna are buried in the New Jerusalem Lutheran Church Cemetery. 101 Jacob Stoneburner, born 8 March 1729 Germany married before 1758 Anna Eva, Berks County, Pa. born circa 1731 died 10 Jan. 1796 Loudoun Co., Va. died 24 May 1796 Loudoun Co., Va. Children of Jacob Stoneburner and Anna Eva: 201 Johann Peter Stoneburner born...

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Slave Narrative of James Lucas

Person Interviewed: James Lucas Location: Natchez Mississippi Place of Residence: Natchez, Adams County MS Date of Birth: October 11, 1833 James Lucas, ex-slave of Jefferson Davis, lives at Natchez, Adams County. Uncle Jim is small, wrinkled, and slightly stooped. His woolly hair is white, and his eyes very bright. He wears a small grizzled mustache. He is always clean and neatly dressed. “Miss, you can count up for yo’se’f. I was born on October 11, 1833. My young Marster give me my age when he heired de prope’ty of his uncle, Marse W.B. Withers. He was a-goin’ through de papers an’ a-burnin’ some of ’em when he foun’ de one ’bout me. Den he says, ‘Jim, dissen’s ’bout you. It gives yo’ birthday.’ “I recollec’ a heap’ bout slav’ry-times, but I’s all by myse’f now. All o’ my frien’s has lef’ me. Even Marse Fleming has passed on. He was a little boy when I was a grown man. “I was born in a cotton fiel’ in cotton pickin’ time, an’ de wimmins fixed my mammy up so she didn’ hardly lose no time at all. My mammy sho’ was healthy. Her name was Silvey an’ her mammy come over to dis country in a big ship. Somebody give her de name o’ Betty, but twant her right name. Folks couldn’ un’erstan’ a word she say. It was some...

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Slave Narrative of Daniel William Lucas

Person Interviewed: Daniel William Lucas Location: Red Bird, Oklahoma Age: 94 I remember them slave days well as it was yesterday, and when I get to remembering the very first thing comes back to me is the little log cabin where at I lived when I was a slave boy back ‘fore the war. Just like yesterday I see that little old cabin standing on a bit of hill about a quarter-mile from the Master’s brick mansion, and I see into the cabin and there’s the old home-made bed with rope cords a-holding up the corn shuck bedding where on I use to sleep after putting in the day at booing cotton or following a slow time rule team down the corn rows ’till it got so dark the old overseer just naturally had to call it a day. And then I see the old baker swinging in the fireplace. That cooked up the corn pone to go with the fat side meats the Master Doctor (didn’t I tell you the Master was a doctor?) give us for the meals of the week day. But on a Sunday morning we always had flour bread, excepting after the war is over and then we is lucky do we get anything. Just like yesterday, I hear the old overseer making round of the dabins every day at four, and I means...

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Biographical Sketch of Ernest Lucas

Ernest Lucas, secretary of the Rubelmann-Lucas Hardware Company of St. Louis, was born in Gasconade county, Missouri, on the 2d of February, 1860, and is a son of George and Amelia (Prosch) Lucas. He supplemented his public school education by study in Johnson’s Business College and thus qualified for the active and responsible duties of life. He started upon his business career as a salesman in his father’s grocery store in 1877 and after three years’ preliminary training there of a thorough character he came to St. Louis in 1880 and entered the employ of Rubelmann & Company, hardware dealers, and through the intervening period of forty years has been associated with the business. In July, 1885, upon the incorporation of the RubelmannLucas Hardware Company, he became one of the directors and the secretary and has continued in this official connection with the business. He is a member of the Missouri Athletic Association, also of the Liederkranz Club and he largely finds his recreation in fishing, but the major part of his time and attention is concentrated upon his business affairs and the house of which he has now been a representative for four decades largely stands as a monument to his keen business discrimination and indefatigable...

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Biography of G. W. Lucas

G. W. Lucas, a progressive farmer residing near Ochelata, in Washington county, is a member of a family that has contributed to the agricultural development of Oklahoma from pioneer times to the present and in addition to his farming interests he also engages in teaming, meeting with success in both branches of activity. He was born in Mercer County, Missouri, November 16, 1869, and when four years of age was taken to Missouri by his parents, John W. and Susan (Hatfield) Lucas, who came to Indian Territory in 1874, settling on Double creek, a mile south of Ochelata, where they cultivated leased land. When the Cherokee Strip was opened up for settlement they removed to that section and took up homesteads which they developed and improved. The father is eighty-seven years of age and the mother has reached her eighty-first year. They make their home with their son, W. R. Lucas, renting the eighty-acre farm, on which there are five good producing oil wells. Mr. and Mrs. Lucas became the parents of six children: Eva J., Jesse A., W. R., G. W., C. I. and Ida A., all of whom are married and living in Oklahoma with the exception of Jesse A. W. R. Lucas is the owner of nine hundred acres of land in this section. In 1915 G. W. Lucas purchased his present ranch of eighty acres,...

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Biographical Sketch of Jay P. Lucas

JAY P. LUCAS. – This enterprising gentleman, whose early grip on public affairs augurs well for still greater things in the future, in a “native son,” having been born in June, 1856, at Monmouth, Oregon the son of the well-known and able A.W. Lucas. He grew up on a farm, developing his fine physique, and receiving his education at the Christian College in his native town, graduating in 1880. He remained with his parents, having a partial business interest with his father, until 8n 1882 he undertook operations for himself, securing and conducting a farm on his own account. He was also, in the same year, married to Miss Katie Frazier. The next year he closed out his interests in Western Oregon and moved to Lone Rick, then in Wasco county, now included in Gilliam. He established there a merchandise business, which he operated for two years. In 1885 he received the appointment as clerk of the new county of Gilliam, serving in that capacity until 1886, when he was elected to the same position, and in 1888 was re-elected, receiving thereby a most hearty and satisfactory indorsement of the manner in which he had served the people. This office he now fills; and he has become closely identified with the interests of this section, of which he is one of the most respected citizens. He was chairman of...

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Cemetery Hill

Cemetery Hill as it is known to us here, being in London, Ky. was a hill on which a Civil War battle was fought. The trenches are still here. The hill was given to the north to bury their dead by Jarvis Jackson, a great grand father of the Jarvis Jackson who is now city police of London, today. By some reason, the soldiers were taken up and moved to a different place only a few years ago. Mrs. Hoage says “the first daisies that were brought to this contry were put on that hill” and she can remember when the entire hill was covered with them. The southern side had trenches on the east side of the Dixie Highway on and surrounding the site where the Pennington Hospital is now standing, which are very vivid today. The London City School being in the path bears a hole today from a cannon ball. Shot no doubt from the Southern forces. The new addition to the school hides the hole, but until recent years it could be seen being about ten inches in diameter. Zollie Coffer a southern general had camped at Wild Cat, Ky. but was forced to retreat when general Garrad and Lucas and Stratton two captains under him, all from Clay county, with a large crowd came in. He, on his retreat came through London and had...

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