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Surname: Low

Swift Family of New Bedford, MA

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now SWIFT. For a hundred years and more the Swift family in and about New Bedford has been one of prominence, wealth. and influence, not only in the several local communities in which its members have resided but out through the Commonwealth and into the nation, where their extensive enterprises have extended. These Acushnet-New Bedford Swifts, a branch of the Cape Cod family, brought to their new field of effort that activity, industry, ability and honesty that had for generations characterized their forefathers and also the line of business that had enriched earlier generations in the old home section – the dealing in live oak timber and its manufacture into water craft, in shipbuilding for not only the United States government, but for those across the water. William Swift, the progenitor of the Swifts under consideration in this article, was at Watertown in the year 1634, and it seems had then been there some time, coming thither from Booking, England. He disposed of his estate in 1637, removed to Sandwich, and there died in January, 1644. His widow Joan, perhaps a second wife, made her will in October, 1662, mentioning therein her son William and his children. His daughter Hannah married Nov. 5, 1642, Daniel Wing. William Swift (2), son of William the settler, was born in...

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Descendants of Davis Snow Packard of Bridgewater, Massachusetts

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now In the death of Davis Snow Packard, which occurred in Brockton, Mass., July 31, 1900, the city lost one of its foremost citizens as well as one of its most successful manufacturers. Mr. Packard was a native of the town of North Bridgewater, now the city of Brockton, born June 24, 1826, son of Apollos and Betsey (Packard) Packard, and a descendant of one of the oldest and most prominent families of the old Bay State. (I) Samuel Packard, the founder of the family in America, was a native of England, his home being at Windham, near Hingham. In 1638 he came to this country in the ship “Diligence,” of Ipswich, accompanied by his wife Elizabeth and one child. He located first at Hingham, Mass., whence he removed to West Bridgewater, where he became one of the first settlers, and where he held various public offices. He was also a tavern-keeper in 1670. His death occurred in West Bridgewater, his will being probated March 3, 1684-85. He was the father of twelve children. (II) Zaccheus Packard, second son and third child of Samuel and Elizabeth Packard, made his home in West Bridgewater, where he followed farming. There he married Sarah Howard, daughter of John Howard, who came from England and settled first at Duxbury, Mass., later...

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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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Muster Roll of Captain James Clark’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain James Clark’s Company of Light Infantry in the Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service “by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the twentieth day of February, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Bangor, Maine, to the eleventh day of May, 1839, when discharged or mustered.

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Muster Roll of Captain Henry Bailey’s Company

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Muster Roll of Captain Henry Bailey’s Company of Infantry in the Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier from the fifth day of March, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Calais Maine, to the sixth day of April, 1839, when discharged or mustered. Captain Henry Bailey. Lieutenant John A. Brown. Ensign William Worster. Sergeants Pickering Patten. Zenas Wheeler. Curtis Merritt. John Church. Corporals Moses Worster, Jr. Joshua W. Norton. Nathan G. Peasley....

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Descendants of Captain Michael Pierce

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The Pierce family is one of the ancient Colonial families of the Commonwealth, the forerunners of the name playing a conspicuous part as masters of vessels bringing hither emigrants from England. For several generations there has lived in New Bedford a branch of the old Rehoboth and Swansea Pierce family, descendants of Capt. Michael Pierce, who have been leading-spirits in the community — names especially conspicuous in the industrial life of the town and vicinity. Reference is made particularly to some of the descendants of the...

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Norwich Vermont in the Civil War

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now During the four years of war for the suppression of the Rebellion, Norwich furnished 178 different men for the armies of the Union. There were seven re-enlistments, making the whole number of soldiers credited to the town 185. By the census of 1860, the number of inhabitants was 1759. It appears, therefore, that the town sent to the seat of war rather more than one in ten of its entire population, during the four years’ continuance of hostilities. About the same proportion holds good for the state at large, Vermont contributing, out of an aggregate population of 315,116, soldiers to the number of 34,555 for the defense of the Union. Of the 178 men enlisting from Norwich, twenty-seven laid down their young lives in the service of the country. The soil of every southern state, from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, was moistened by the blood or supplied a grave to one or more of these. The town paid the larger part of these men liberal bounties, amounting to about $32,000, in addition to their state and government pay. All calls for men upon the town by the national authorities were promptly and fully met. The patriotic response of our people to the expenses and sacrifices of the war was, in general, hearty and emphatic;...

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Biography of Marcus A. Low

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now No intelligent resident of Kansas would dispute the assertion that in Marcus A. Low, of Topeka, is found one of the really big men of the state. He is a man of many achievements. His ability in the law had led to distinguished position with great corporations; his ranching and developing of oil and gas properties have been conducted on so large a scale as seemingly might have been weighty enough interests to engage the ordinary man; his political foresight and intnition have caused his selection for public office as high as he would accept, but not upon these evidences of keen foresight and broad vision rests Mr. Low’s most enduring fame. It is as a railroad builder he will be recalled by the people of Kansas who have so proflted through his tireless energy. Marcus A. Low was born August 1, 1842, in the State of Maine. When four years old his parents, Frederick P. and Mary J. (Robinson) Low, moved to Belvidere, Boone County, Illinois, where the father engaged in farming and other occupations. In 1869 the family moved to Hamilton, Missouri, and that place continued to be the home of the parents during the remainder of their lives. In the public schools of Belvidere Marcus A. Low continued until he was fifteen years...

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Low, Archie E. – Obituary

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Archie E. Low, well-known young man of Union, who served some time with the A. E. F. in France, died at his home in Union Saturday night, after a long illness. Mr. Low was gassed while overseas, and never regained his health. He came home to Union last summer, but upon the advice of physicians went to Seattle and entered the government hospital there. His condition did not improve however, and he was brought home by his father last week. Deceased was a member of Union Post No. 50, American Legion, and the funeral took place in Union, with interment in the Union Cemetery, Monday afternoon of this week. Archie Edward Low was born in Pendleton, Oregon, October 17, 1892 and died in Union February 7, 1920. He was married in 1919 to Marie A. Simpson. He was two years and six months in the United States army. Eighteen months of which was spent overseas. She was in five of the most severe engagements, was severely gassed in one which was the immediate cause of his death. He is survived by his widow, his parents Mr. And Mrs. William Low, six sisters and two brothers. Funeral services conducted by Rev. Cook of the M. E. Church were held Monday at 32 p.m. from Cock Brothers undertaking...

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