Surname: Logan

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

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Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In...

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Higbee Graveyard Madison Indiana

This is an historical transcription of Higbee Cemetery, Madison, Jefferson County, Indiana which was transcribed in 1941 as part of the WPA cemetery transcription project. The value of this transcription is that in many cases they transcribed headstones which may today no longer exist. Had it not been for this project, created to provide employment opportunities during the depression, these records may have been lost due to the natural regression of cemeteries. Many of the cemeteries may be known by a different name today, we use the name they were identified as in 1941. Davidson, Thomas, Apr 22 1767...

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Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

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Cattaraugus Indian Reservation Map and Occupants, 1890

The Cattaraugus Reservation, in Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, and Erie Counties, New York, as delineated on the map, occupies both sides of Cattaraugus creek. It is 9.5 miles long on a direct east and west line, averages 3 miles in width at the center, dropping at is eastern line an additional rectangle of 2 by 3 miles. A 6-mile strip on the north and 2 “mile blocks” at diagonal corners are occupied by white people, and litigation is pending as to their rights and responsibilities. The Seneca Nation claims that the permit or grant under which said lands were occupied and...

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Biography of Hugh Logan

Hugh Logan was born in Ireland. At the age of fourteen years he had a difficulty with his father, and ran away from home and went to sea. He followed the life of a sailor for three years, and then landed at Philadelphia, and made his way from there to Kentucky, during the first settlement of that State. He married Rebecca Bryan, a sister of Jonathan, David and Henry Bryan, who had been raised by her aunt, Mrs. Daniel Boone; her mother having died while she was young. Their children were William, Alexander, Hugh, Jr., Henry (called “Boss”) and Mary A. Mr. Logan was drowned in Fleming’s creek, Ky., while attempting to swim a race horse across the stream, and his body was not found until twenty-four hours afterward. The night before his death he had a singular premonition of his approaching fate, in a dream, in which the catastrophe of the following day was clearly depicted. He related the dream to his wife, who tried to persuade him not to go near the creek that day; but he laughed at her for being scared at a dream, and met his death as above stated. William Logan, the eldest son, married Nancy H. Hobbs, daughter of Joseph Hobbs and Nancy Hughes, and came to Missouri in 1820, with his wife and, one child, on horseback. They had twelve children...

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Biographical Sketch of Hon. Thomas M. C. Logan

Hon. Thomas M.C. Logan, senator elect of 34th district, was born in Rush County, Ind., Feb. 13th, 1830; moved to Richland County, Ill., in April 1857; thence to Cedar Rapids, Linn County; and from there to Harrison County. He has been engaged most of his life in farming and dealing in stock. He resides on his fine farm adjoining Logan. He was married Feb. 17th, 1851, to Charlotte Snodgrass, in La Porte, Ind., who died in Jan. 1867, leaving a son and a daughter. He afterwards married at Cedar Rapids, Harriet Herbert. They have four sons and three...

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Slave Narrative of Carrie Bradley Logan Bennett

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Carrie Bradley Logan Bennett Age: 79 plus Location: Helena, Arkansas “I was born not a great piece from Mobile but it was in Mississippi in the country. My mother b’long to Massa Tom Logan. He was a horse trader. He got drowned in 1863—durin’ of the War, the old war. His wife was Miss Liza Jane. They had several children and some gone from home I jus’ seed when they be on visits home. The ones at home I can recollect was Tiney, John, Bill, and Alex. I played wid Tiney and nursed Bill and Alex was a baby when Massa Tom got drowned. “We never knowed how Massa Tom got drowned. They brought him home and buried him. His horse come home. He had been in the water, water was froze on the saddle. They said it was water soaked. They thought he swum the branch. Massa Tom drunk some. We never did know what did happen. I didn’t know much ’bout ’em. “He had two or three families of slaves. Ma cooked, washed and ironed for all on the place. She went to the field in busy times. Three of the men drove horses, tended to ’em. They fed ’em and curried and sheared ’em. Ma said Massa Tom sure thought a heap of his niggers and fine stock. They’d bring...

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Biography of Tiffin P. Logan

Tiffin P. Logan, land and loan agent, Mattoon; was born in Trimble Co., Ky., March 28, 1844; his father was a man of prominence, a cousin to President Harrison, and was honored by the Democratic party with a seat in the Kentucky Legislature during the sessions of 1844-45; in the spring of 1858, removed with his family to Illinois, and located in Windsor, Shelby Co.; here he occupied the office of Justice of the Peace eleven years in succession; here Tiffin P. began life for himself; he lived with his brother-in-law till he attained the age of 15 years; at this age he could neither read nor write; leaving his taskmaster, he determined to lend his energies to the acquiring of an education; by the performance of various commissions he paid his board, tuition, and other necessary expenses, and at the expiration of three years, had acquired a good elementary education, and had $8 ahead; March 8, 1864, he located where Ottawa, Kan., now is, then occupied by eleven tribes of Indians; with these, he lived some six weeks, sole representative of the Caucasian race; here, with a capital of $41, he began the manufacture of shingles, and in nine months accumulated $1,200; owing to ill health, he closed out his business, and engaged in clerking for Holt & Evans, the first white men operating a store in Ottawa;...

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel B. Logan

Samuel B. Logan, one of the very oldest of the pioneers now living in Douglas County, and the first sheriff, was born near the village of Washington, Mason County, Kentucky, April 30, 1816. He is a son of Joseph and Mary (Morris) Logan. The former was a native of Mason County and the latter of the state of New Jersey. John Logan (grand-father) was one of the early settlers from Pennsylvania, and after his arrival in Kentucky he lived in a fort. Joseph Logan (father) was a soldier in the war of 1812 and was in the battle of the Thames. John Morris (grand-father) was a native of New Jersey and in the opinion of Mr. Logan was a soldier in the war of the Revolution. His father and mother, in 1837, removed to Coles County and located within two miles of where Mr. Logan now resides. The first year his father raised a crop, renting his land of old Jacob Moore. Samuel B. Logan enjoys the honor of having been the first sheriff of Douglas County, and has lived a long, honorable and beautiful life in his adopted County. In 1848 he was married to Miss Leah Fuller, a native of Virginia, whose death occurred in 1896. To this marriage were born twelve children. Of this number six are living, viz: Samuel F., Albert W., Harriet J., Hannah...

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