Surname: Lewis

Ancestors of Frederick Macy of New Bedford Massachusetts

The Macy family of New Bedford is among the oldest and most prominent families of Nantucket, the name having been identified with the business interests of New Bedford for the past seventy years. The first American ancestor of the family was Thomas Macy, clothier merchant, who came, it is said, from the county of Wilts, England, and was in Newbury, Mass., a proprietor; he was a freeman of Sept. 6, 1639. He removed to Salisbury and was town officer and deputy. He removed about 1659 from there to Chilmark; his was the first family on Nantucket island. He was...

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Index to Articles found in the El Farol Newspaper 1905-1906

The Lincoln County New Mexico online archives contains pdf’s of all remaining copies of the El Farol Newspaper of Capitan NM, but doesn’t have an index to the newspaper. C. W. Barnum, an active member of AHGP, and state coordinator for the New Mexico AHGP recently invested his time and energy into providing an every person index to the various extant issues. He has shared this wonderful index with AccessGenealogy in hopes that it will reach a wider audience. Enjoy!

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Descendants of Thomas Tobey of Sandwich, MA

The earliest record of a Toby or Tobey in our American annals is that of one Francis of Boston, who was in court on July 7, 1635.

The first known and credited ancestor of this family was Thomas Tobey, of Scituate, Mass. He removed to Sandwich, Mass., and was a member of church there in 1694. He married at Sandwich Nov. 18, 1650, Martha Knott, daughter of George Knott, deceased

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Descendants of Philip Taber of New Bedford, MA

The Taber family of Dartmouth and New Bedford is descended from (I) Philip Taber, who, according to Savage, was born in 1605, and died in 1672. He was at Watertown in 1634, and he contributed toward building the galley for the security of the harbor. He was made a freeman at Plymouth in that same year. In 1639-40 he was a deputy from Yarmouth, and was afterward at Martha’s Vineyard, and from 1647 to 1655 was at Edgartown, going from there to New London in 1651, but probably returning soon. He was an inhabitant of Portsmouth in February, 1655, and was a representative in Providence in 1661, the commissioners being Roger Williams, William Field, Thomas Olney, Joseph Torrey, Philip Taber and John Anthony. Later he settled in Tiverton, where his death occurred. He married Lydia Masters, of Watertown, Mass., daughter of John and Jane Masters, and his second wife, Jane, born in 1605, died in 1669.

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Descendants of Nicholas Snow of Eastham, MA

Nicholas Snow, a native of England, came to this country in 1623 in the ship “Ann,” locating in Plymouth, where he had a share in the division of land in 1624. In 1634 he removed to Eastham, where he became a prominent citizen. His home was on the road from Plymouth to Eel river, on the Westerly side. He was admitted a freeman in 1633, and was elected town clerk at the first meeting of the town of Eastham, holding that office sixteen years. He was deputy to the General Court from 1648, three years; selectman from 1663, seven years. He and his son Mark signed the call to Rev. John Mayo to settle as their minister in 1655. He was one of Gov. Thomas Prence’s associates. He married at Plymouth, Constance, daughter of Stephen Hopkins, who came over in the “Mayflower.” Constance herself came in the “Mayflower.” She died in October, 1677. Mr. Snow died Nov. 15, 1676, in Eastham, Mass.

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Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

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Staples Family of Taunton, MA

STAPLES (Taunton family). The Staples name is one of long and honorable standing in New England and the country. The family has been a continuous one in the Bay State for two hundred and seventy and more years, and at Taunton, in this Commonwealth, have lived generation after generation of the name down to the present – a worthy race, one representative of the best type of citizenship. Such men in more recent generations as the two Sylvanus Staples, father and son, and the latter’s son Sylvanus Nelson Staples, and the two Ebenezer Staples and Abiel B. Staples –...

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Captain Stewart, G. M. D. No. 655, Lagrange District

Captain Stewart, G. M. D. No. 655, Lagrange District Adams, Absalom Adams, James M. Allums, Britton Amoss, James Barnes, William Bays, John R. Bays, Moses Bays, Nathaniel Boman, Isham Boman, Larkin Boman, Levi Boman, Robert Boman, William Brooks, Isaac R. Brooks, John Brooks, William Burson, Isaac C. Butler, Whitaker Cardwell, William Collum, James Crawley, Bird Crawley, Turner Culberson, David H. Culberson, James H. Culberson, Jeremiah C. Curry, James Daniel, James L. Daniel, William B. Day, Stephen Dennis, Peter Dickson, Thomas Dunn, Barney Ethredge, Bryant Ethridge, Zachariah Funderburk, Washington Furgison, Burrell Gibson, Churchill Gibson, William Glenn, James Gresham, Davis E. Grizzle, Kinchen Guyse, Joel Harbuck, Henry, Sr. Harbuck, Henry, Jr. Harbuck, William Hendon, Henry T. Hicks, Jacob Hicks, Littleberry Hicks, Nathaniel Holmes, Benjamin Holt, William Hopson, William Horton, Jeremiah Jackson, Thomas Jenkins, John Jenkins, Robert Jennings, Robert M. Johnson, Lewis Johnson, Mordecai Jones, Willie Keeth, James M. Kilgore, Robert Kilgore, William Kirkland, John Kolb, Jonathan Latimer, Samuel M. Layton, Thomas S. Lewis, Henry. Lipham, John McCullars, Andrew McPost, Lindsey Mays, James Mays, Robert Meadows, Simeon Meadows, Vincent Miller, John C. Mobley, William Moran, Jesse Moran, William J. Morgan, Wilson Norman, Jeremiah Pace, Noel Patterson, James Patterson, John, Jr. Patterson, Thomas Patterson, William Peppin, Noah Phipps, Thomas Poe, Gilbert Poe, Jonathan Poe, Solomon Post, John B. Post, Samuel B. Powers, James G. Redding, John Reeves, James Rigsby, Allen Rigsby, Eli Rigsby,...

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Washington Irving at Fort Gibson, 1832

The McIntosh Creeks had been located along Arkansas River near the Verdigris on fertile timbered land which they began at once to clear, cultivate, and transform into productive farms. The treaty of 1828 with the Cherokee gave the latter a great tract of land on both sides of Arkansas River embracing that on which the Creeks were located. This was accomplished by a blunder of the Government officials, in the language of the Secretary of War, 1U.S. House, Executive Documents, 22d congress, first session, no. 116, President’s Message submitting the memorial of the Creek Indians. “when we had not...

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Establishment of Fort Gibson in 1824

By Act of Congress of March 2, 1819, Arkansas Territory was established July 4, embracing substantially all of what are now the states of Arkansas and Oklahoma; though the civil government of Arkansas Territory was limited to that section lying east of the Osage line, divided into counties, and embracing approximately the present state of Arkansas. That west of the Osage line was the Indian country, and in later years became known as Indian Territory. James Miller 1James Miller was born in Peterboro, N. H., April 25, 1776; entered the array as major in 1808, became Lieutenant-colonel in 1810,...

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Indians in Mason County Michigan 1880 Census

These 355 people were identified as Indians (I) in column 4 (color) of the 1880 census for Mason County Michigan. In order to have been enumerated they are believed to either have renounced tribal rule, and under state law, exercised their rights as citizens; or because they “mingled” with the white population of these Michigan towns were enumerated under the expanded definitions.

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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

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