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Surname: Lester

Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In...

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1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East...

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An Historical Sketch of the Seneca County Medical Society

At the anniversary meeting of the Seneca County Medical Society held at Waterloo, July 23, 1885, a resolution was introduced by Dr. S. R. Welles, and adopted by the Society, that a committee be appointed which should prepare biographical sketches of members of the Society from its earliest history to the present time. As a result, this manuscript was published which includes 75 biographies of the early pioneers of the Seneca County Medical Society.

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1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George...

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Slave Narrative of Angeline Lester

Interviewer: Frank M. Smith Person Interviewed: Angeline Lester Location: Youngstown, Ohio Place of Residence: 835 West Federal Street Story and Photo by Frank M. Smith Ex-Slaves Mahoning County, Dist. #5 Youngstown, Ohio The Story of MRS. ANGELINE LESTER, of Youngstown, Ohio. Mrs. Angeline Lester lives at 836 West Federal Street, on U.S. Route #422, in a very dilapidated one story structure, which once was a retail store room with an addition built on the rear at a different floor level. Angeline lives alone and keeps her several cats and chickens in the house with her. She was born on the plantation of Mr. Womble, near Lumpkin, Stewart County, Georgia about 1847, the exact date not known to her, where she lived until she was about four years old. Then her father was sold to a Dr. Sales, near Brooksville, Georgia, and her mother and a sister two years younger were sold to John Grimrs[HW:?], who in turn gave them to his newly married daughter, the bride of Henry Fagen, and was taken to their plantation, near Benevolence, Randolph County, Georgia. When the Civil War broke out, Angeline, her mother and sister were turned over to Robert Smith, who substituted for Henry Fagen, in the Confederate Army. Angeline remembers the soldiers coming to the plantation, but any news about the war was kept from them. After the war a celebration...

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Biography of David Harvey Lester

David Harvey Lester. For almost a half century has David Harvey Lester been a resident of Champaign County and it has been his privilege to witness and bear a part in its remarkable development. He is a native of Indiana and was born in Switzerland County, October 18, 1848. His parents were David A. and Eliza A. (Gerard) Lester, who were the parents of eight children, the survivors being: Martha, who is the widow of Robert T. Graham, has five children and lives at Vevay, Indiana; David Harvey; Margaret, who is a resident of Saint Joseph, Champaign County; Mary, who is the wife of Eugene Abbott, a farmer in Wabash County, Indiana; Armenia, who is the wife of John More, a fruit dealer and grocer living in California; Clara, who is the wife of A. T. Clark and they live in Indiana; and John, who is an agriculturist and resides near Cromwell in Noble County, Indiana. David A. Lester and his wife were born in Switzerland County, Indiana, where he died at the early age of thirty-five years. After the death of her husband the mother of the above family remained in Indiana until 1889, when she came to Champaign County, Illinois, where she yet resides. She has reached the unusual age of ninety years and, what is more remarkable, has retained her faculties unimpaired and enjoys general good...

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Hanford Comstock Todd of Mt. Hope NY

Hanford Comstock Todd8, (Darius W.7, Elnathan6, John5, John4, John3, John2, Christopher1) born Feb. 17, 1832, died Aug. 1, 1870, and was buried in Mt. Hope, Westchester County, N. Y., married Feb. 17, 1857, Mercy Anne Marclay, who was born Nov. 29, 1836, died Oct. 27, 1909. Children: 1835. Mary Osborn Todd, b. June 9, 1858, m. April 20, 1913, George Holiday. They reside in Rhinebeck, N. Y. 1836. Martin Barclay Todd, b. Nov. 20, 1859. 1837. William Hanford Todd, born June 9, 1861, married July 2, 1891, Catherine French. He is a physician and resides in Dobb’s Ferry, N. Y. Children: I. Warwick Hanford Todd, b. Sept. 11, 1892, graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, N. Y. II. Kenneth William Todd, b. Nov. 14, 1894, attended Columbia University, New York, City. III. Katherine Beatrice Todd, b. Aug. 10, 1898. 1838. George Sullivan Carter Todd, born Oct. 22, 1862, died May 22, 1897, and was buried in the Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Tarrytown, N. Y., married Sarah E. Carter. Children: I. Sarah Carter Todd, b. March 22, 1891. II. Ruth McCloud Todd, b. Oct. 20, 1892. 1839. Robert Bentley Todd, born Aug. 10, 1864, married Oct. 20, 1897, Mabel Augusta Lester. They lived in Cincinnati, Ohio. Child: I. Dorothy Lester, b. Dec. 5, 1898. 1840. Anne Margaret Comstock Todd, born Nov. 25, 1865, married July 26, 1893,...

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Biography of Edward Lester

Edward Lester was born at Covington, Kentucky, in 1829. His parents, Joseph and Elizabeth (Holmes) Lester, were natives of Yorkshire, England. They came to the United States in 1818 and settled in Indiana and later located in Covington. There his father was engaged in building, and later as an employee in the first cotton factory that was ever erected west of the Alleghany Mountains. In 1830 Mr. Lester’s parents settled in Hamilton County, Ohio, and engaged in agricultural pursuits. There the subject of this sketch was reared and schooled. His schooling was such as could be obtained in the common schools of that date, and from early life he was inured to the hard labor of an Ohio farm. In 1852 Mr. Lester decided to try his fortune in the El Dorado of the West, and in the spring of that year he went to New Orleans, thence to Brownsville, Texas, and across Mexico to Mazatlan, and from there via sail-vessel to San Francisco. From San Francisco he proceeded at once to the mining districts. Not meeting with success in that calling, he turned to farm work and was for some years engaged in Marin, Yolo and Sonoma counties. In 1855 he went to South America and located at Lima, Peru, and there established the first American brickyard in that country. He successfully conducted his enterprise until 1858. In...

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Biography of of Segler H. Lester

Segler H. Lester (deceased) was born in Virginia October 29, 1804, and died in Garrett Township May 22, 1864, and married Parthenia Cassaday May 14, 1833. Mrs. Lester, who is known among her neighbors as Grandma Lester, still survives. She was a daughter of Daniel Cassaday, of Virginia, where she was horn July 9, 1811, and spent her early years in Kentucky. In 1829 she came with her parents to Edgar County, Illinois, where she met Mr. Lester, whom she subsequently married. Immediately after her wedding she moved with her husband to a place on the Springfield or State road, where there were about four families, of whom Mrs. Lester is the only survivor. In the autumn of 1834 she moved to the site of her present residence, where a round log cabin, 16×18 feet, was built, and the new family began the difficulties of pioneer life, with little more capital than willing hands and stout hearts. There were no cabins nearer than ten miles north and seven miles south, the site being chosen by Mrs. Lester because the Indians had once made it their camping ground. Here five children were born, and here was laid the foundation of a handsome competence ; here also the homestead still shelters the welcome guest. “There was no open road to fortune for the pioneers; the nearest market for surplus produce was...

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