Surname: Lee

Memoirs of the LeFlore Family

The Cravat families of Choctaws are the descendants of John Cravat, a Frenchman, who came among the Choctaws at an early day, and was adopted among them by marriage. He had two daughters by his Choctaw wife, Nancy and Rebecca, both of whom became the wives of Louis LeFlore. His Choctaw wife dying he married a Chickasaw woman, by whom he had four sons, Thomas, Jefferson, William and Charles, and one daughter, Elsie, who married- a white man by the name of Daniel Harris, and who became the parents of Col. J. D. Harris, whose first wife was Catharine Nail,...

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The Brickey House of Prairie du Rocher Illinois

Nearly every town has an old house with an interesting story. Prairie du Rocher has several, one of which was the Brickey house. Unoccupied for many years, this large three-story, square-framed house with its wide porches, stained glass, shuttered windows, and mansard roof attracted the attention of the most casual visitor to the village. It stood among large trees of a generous plot of ground below the bluff, it silently proclaimed the hospitality that once was known there. The fine iron fence that enclosed the grounds emphasized its air of detachment.

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The Brickey Family of Prairie du Rocher Illinois

Two years prior to Missouri’s admission into the Union, October 16, 1819, Franklin W. Brickey saw the light of day in Potosi, Missouri. He attended the public schools and at the age of 19 he came to Illinois. In 1838 he started in business at Fort Chartres, supplying steam-boats with wood and general merchandise. Enterprising and with great foresight he became interested in the Red Bud Mill. In 1858 he erected the present mill at Prairie du Rocher, and at that time his property in Fort Chartres had been swept away by high water. He afterwards started the general...

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Seneca County New York Biographies

In the 1980’s a series of newsletters were published four times a year by Seneca County NY featuring historical information concerning Seneca county and her past residents. The current historian for Seneca County placed these online using PDF files. One of the main features of each edition were biographical sketches of early settlers of Seneca County. Unfortunately, while they provided an index inside of a spreadsheet for the 189 biographies, it is difficult for the average user to quickly get around. I’ve taken their spreadsheet and linked each edition to the PDF file. Once you’ve found the biography you...

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Biography of Reverend Samuel Goddard

Mr. Samuel Goddard was born at Sutton, Massachusetts, July 6, 1772. We have no information concerning his early life. His opportunities for education are said to have been scanty. After coming to manhood he was for several years in trade with a brother in Royalston, Mass. Here he married his first wife (Abigail Goddard of Athol, a town adjoining Royalston), and here his older children were born.

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Sons of Quebec 1778-1843

The Sons of Quebec (Fils de Québec) were written by Pierre-Georges Roy and published in 1933 in a four volume set. They provide a series of short biographies of one to three pages of Quebec men from 1778-1843. Warning… this manuscript is in French!

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The Discovery Of This Continent, it’s Results To The Natives

In the year 1470, there lived in Lisbon, a town in Portugal, a man by the name of Christopher Columbus, who there married Dona Felipa, the daughter of Bartolome Monis De Palestrello, an Italian (then deceased), who had arisen to great celebrity as a navigator. Dona Felipa was the idol of her doting father, and often accompanied him in his many voyages, in which she soon equally shared with him his love of adventure, and thus became to him a treasure indeed not only as a companion but as a helper; for she drew his maps and geographical charts, and...

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A Brief History of Norwich University

In 1835, the American Literary, Scientific, and Military Academy became “Norwich University,” by virtue of an act of incorporation granted by the legislature of Vermont the previous year. Captain Alden Partridge remained at the head of the institution until 1843, and soon after sold the buildings and grounds to the Trustees of the University. There was one feature in the scheme of education established at Norwich University which honorably distinguished it from nearly all other similar institutions of its time in New England. From the first it was wholly free from sectarian influence. This principle was prominently set forth...

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Lee, Roy Thomas – Obituary

His home, S4202 Grand Blvd. Husband of Mrs. Myrtle L. Lee at the home; father of Mrs. Gladys McCarthy, Spokane; brother of Mrs. Charlotte Wilkinson, Okanogan, Wash.; Mrs. Carl Penner, Mrs. Guy Kent, Ted Lee, all of Walla Walla, Wash.; Henry Lee, Pendleton, Ore.; numerous nieces and nephews. A member of the Church of Christ Scientist; the Elks Lodge of Walla Walla, Wash., The Brotherhood of Railway Train men. A resident of Spokane 27 years. Mr. Lee will be sent by the Hazen & Jaeger Funeral Home, N1306 Monroe St. to the Groseclose Mortuary, Walla Walla, Wn., where services will be held Thurs., Oct. 5 at 2 p.m. burial services at Mountain View Cemetery, Walla Walla. Contributed by: Shelli...

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Lee, Robert E. – Obituary

Robert E. Lee, 69, range keeper for the state game department at the Kettle Falls game farm died suddenly from a heart attack while attending an auction sale in Colville Saturday [May 1, 1954]. He was born May 17, 1884 at Walla Walla and resided at Kettle Falls the past five years. Survivors include his wife Hattie at the home; one daughter Mrs. Rex Jones [Roberta] of Dayton, Wash., a son Robert Lee Jr., of Milton-Freewater, Ore.; three sisters, Mrs. Jos. Wilkenson [Charlotte] of Omak and Mrs. Carl Penner [Edith] and Mrs. Guy Kent [Margaret] of Walla Walla; three brothers, Roy T. Lee of Spokane, John H. Lee of Pendleton, Ore., and Theodore R. Lee of Walla Walla, and two grandchildren. The body was taken to Walla Walla by the Moser & Egger funeral home for final services. Interment was in the Blue Mountain Cemetery, Walla Walla. Contributed by: Shelli...

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Lee, Harley Essex – Obituary

Kansas City–Harley E. Lee, one of the five Lee brothers who founded the old Lee Hotel, now the Huckins, Oklahoma City, died Monday [June 13, 1960]. He was 75. Lee was prominent in real estate and investment and moved here from Oklahoma City in 1922. He developed one of the leading housing developments in Leewood, a suburb of Kansas City. He and his four brothers became partners in Oklahoma real estate in the early 1900s. Lee was a native of Ottumwa, Iowa. Services will be at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday in Stiner and McClure Funeral Home. Burial will be at 1 p.m. Thursday at Fairlawn Cemetery, Oklahoma City. Surviving are his wife, Ruth; his daughter, Mrs. Jack C. Mankin, Kansas City, and four grandchildren. The Oklahoman, June 15, 1960 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Biographical Sketch of David M. Lee

(See Downing)—David Marshall, son of John and Mary (Faulkner) Lee, was born in Sequoyah District July 9, 1861, educated in Male Seminary. Married March 12, 1881, Mary Elmira, daughter of lames Franklin and Elmire (Simcoe) Bethel, born September 10, 1858 in Sebastian County, Arkansas. They are the parents of Florence Ada, deceased; Lizzie May, born Jan. 16, 1883, married W. F. Wasson; Lou Emma, born December 15, 1886, married James A. Jackson and died July 28, 1920; Flossie Edna, born February 13, 1889, mar­ried James B. Galloway and Frank Emmett Lee, born October 23, 1891 and married Mary Daugherty. David Marshall Lee is a Mason, Odd Fellow and Knight of Pythias He was elected to council from Sequoyah District, August 1, 1887. Mr. and Mrs. Lee have gratuitously adopted and reared the following orphans: James Sanderrs, Florence Emma Lackey, Mary Jane Lee, Wash Lee, Maudie May Lee, Carnell Overtaker, Alfred Andrews, David Bates Jackson, Flossie May Jackson and James P. Jackson, Jr. Benjamin, son of Thomas and Catherine Pettit, married Peggy Cunningan and their daughter Nannie married Franklin Faulkner and they were the parents of Mary Faulkner who married John...

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Treaty of August 24, 1835

Treaty with the Comanche and Witchetaw Indians and their associated Bands. For the purpose of establishing and perpetuating peace and friendship between the United States of America and the Comanche and Witchetaw nations, and their associated bands or tribes of Indians, and between these nations or tribes, and the Cherokee, Muscogee, Choctaw, Osage, Seneca and Quapaw nations or tribes of Indians, the President of the United States has, to accomplish this desirable object, and to aid therein, appointed Governor M. Stokes, M. Arbuckle Brigdi.-Genl. United States army, and F. W. Armstrong, Actg. Supdt. Western Territory, commissioners on the part of the United States; and the said Governor M. Stokes and M. Arbuckle, Brigdi. Genl. United States army, with the chiefs and representatives of the Cherokee, Muscogee, Choctaw, Osage, Seneca, and Quapaw nations or tribes of Indians, have met the chiefs, warriors, and representatives of the tribes first above named at Camp Holmes, on the eastern border of the Grand Prairie, near the Canadian river, in the Muscogee nation, and after full deliberation, the said nations or tribes have agreed with the United States, and with one another upon the following articles: Article 1. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America, and all the individuals composing the Comanche and Witchetaw nations and their associated bands or tribes of Indians, and...

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Slave Narrative of Charles Lee Dalton

Interviewer: Miss Nancy Woodburn Watkins Person Interviewed: Charles Lee Dalton Location: Madison, North Carolina Age: 93 Ex-Slave Biography–Charles Lee Dalton, 93. In July, 1934, the census taker went to the home of Unka Challilee Dalton and found that soft talking old darky on the porch of his several roomed house, a few hundred feet south of the dirt road locally called the Ayersville road because it branches from the hard surfaced highway to Mayodan at Anderson Scales’ store, a short distance from Unka Challilie’s. Black got its meaning from his face, even his lips were black, but his hair was whitening. His lean body was reclining while the white cased pillows of his night bed sunned on a chair. His granddaughter kept house for him the census taker learned. Unka Challilie said: “I’se got so I ain’t no count fuh nuthin. I wuz uh takin’ me a nap uh sleepin’ (‘ AM). Dem merry-go-wheels keep up sich a racket all nite, sech a racket all nite, ah cyan’t sleep.” This disturbance was “The Red Wolfe Medicine Troop of Players and Wheels” near Anderson Scales’ store in the forks of the Mayodan and the Ayresville roads. In 1937 in the home of his son, Unka Challilie ninety-three, told the cause of his no “countness.” “I wuz clean-up man in de mill in Mayodan ontill three years ago, I got too...

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Biographical Sketch of Jeremiah Lee

Jeremiah Lee was an early settler in town; had a family of eight children. Two only were sons, Prosper and Gay W. He was a farmer; also a constable and collector of taxes many years. He lived on the place his grandson, Wilber Hamilton, now occupies. Mrs. Sarah Lee Hemenway is also a descendant. Captain Lee died in 1843, aged seventy-one...

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