Surname: Leavenworth

Western Garrison Life

Grant Foreman describes the early life in a Western Garrison; providing insights on some of the traders in the region, the deaths of Seaton, Armstrong, Wheelock and Izard, all soldiers obviously familiar to him. But he also shares the story of the elopement of Miss Sarah Knox Taylor, daughter of General Taylor, to Lieutenant Jefferson Davis… yes, THAT Jefferson Davis.

An interesting section of the chapter are the references to the punishments inflicted upon the soldiers in the event of their disobedience.

Painted by Catlin in 1834, the picture attached is of Clermont, chief of the Osage Tribe. Clermont is painted in full length, wearing a fanciful dress, his leggings fringed with scalp-locks, and in his hand his favorite and valued war-club.

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Fort Gibson Conference with the Indians, 1834

One of the most important Indian conferences ever held in the Southwest, occurred at Fort Gibson in 1834 for it paved the way for agreements and treaties essential to the occupation of a vast country by one hundred thousand members of the Five Civilized Tribes emigrating from east of the Mississippi; to the security of settlers and travelers in a new country; to development of our Southwest to the limits of the United States and beyond and contributed to the subsequent acquisition of the country to the coast, made known to us by the pioneers to Santa Fe and California traveling through the region occupied by the “wild” Indians who, at Fort Gibson, gave assurances of their friendship. It is true, these assurances were not always regarded, and many outrages were afterwards committed on the whites and by the whites, but the Fort Gibson conference was the beginning and basis upon which ultimately these things were accomplished.

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The Osage Massacre

When the treaty council with the Osage at Fort Gibson broke up in disagreement on April 2, 1833, three hundred Osage warriors under the leadership of Clermont departed for the west to attack the Kiowa. It was Clermont’s boast that he never made war on the whites and never made peace with his Indian enemies. At the Salt Plains where the Indians obtained their salt, within what is now Woodward County, Oklahoma, they fell upon the trail of a large party of Kiowa warriors going northeast toward the Osage towns above Clermont’s. The Osage immediately adapted their course to that pursued by their enemies following it back to what they knew would be the defenseless village of women, children, and old men left behind by the warriors. The objects of their cruel vengeance were camped at the mouth of Rainy-Mountain Creek, a southern tributary of the Washita, within the present limits of the reservation at Fort Sill.

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Colonel Dodge Reaches Villages of Western Indians

Trailing through broad and verdant valleys, they went, their progress often arrested by hundreds of acres of plum trees bending to the ground with tempting fruit; crossing oak ridges where the ground was covered with loaded grapevines, through suffocating creek-bottom thickets, undergrowth of vines and briars, laboring up rocky hillsides and laboring down again, the horses picking their way through impeding rocks and boulders, until on the twenty-ninth of the month, two hundred miles from Fort Gibson, General Leavenworth and his staff reached Captain Dean’s camp, a mile or two from the Washita, where there were quartered two companies of the Third Infantry from Fort Towson. Reports of sickness among the men were alarming. They were dying daily, and failure of the expedition was threatened. General Leavenworth, who had intended to send the command on from the Washita in charge of Colonel Dodge, announced that he himself would proceed in charge to the Wichita country. It was not until the first day of July that the regiment came dragging into camp with forty-five men and three officers ill from exposure, the surgeon said, brought on by marching through the heat of the day. A contributing cause was the strange diet to which these untrained, undisciplined men gave themselves, and the sudden and intemperate indulgence of their appetite in abundant buffalo meat. On arrival at the Washita, seventy-five horses and...

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Descendants of Leonard Crocker Couch of Taunton MA

COUCH (Taunton family). The family bearing this name at Taunton whose representative head is now Leonard Crocker Couch, Esq., who since boyhood has been a resident of the city, occupied in mechanical and business lines, and for years one of the substantial men and useful citizens of the community, is one of long and honorable standing in the neighboring State of Connecticut and of distinction in our country. And through its Taunton alliance of a generation ago – that of Maj. Gen. Darius Nash Couch, of Civil war fame, the father of the present Leonard Crocker Couch just alluded...

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Peace Attempts with Western Prairie Indians, 1833

What was known as the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek was entered into in Mississippi with the Choctaw Indians September 27, 1830; 1Kappler, op. cit., vol. ii, 221. pursuant to the terms of the treaty, in 1832 the movement of the Choctaw to their new home between the Canadian and Red rivers was under way but they were in danger from incursions of the Comanche and Pani Picts 2Called by early French traders Pani Pique tattooed Pawnee, and known to the Kiowa and Comanche by names meaning Tattooed Faces. [U.S. Bureau of Ethnology, Handbook of American Indians, part ii,...

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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A History of Waterloo New York Newspapers

The pioneer printer of Seneca County was George Lewis, who, in the year 1815, started in the village of Ovid a small sheet entitled the Seneca Patriot. The office of publication was located on Seneca Street, in the upper story of a building on whose site the engine-house now stands. At the close of a single volume, Mr. Lewis changed the name of his paper to The Ovid Gazette, and when Elisha Williams secured the removal of the County seat to Waterloo, Lewis removed hither with his press in May, 1817, and continued the issue of his paper as...

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Biographical Sketch of Edwin John Leavenworth

Leavenworth, Edwin John; lithographer and stationer; born, St. Catherines, Canada, March 27, 1859; son of E. S. and Cindrella Leavenworth; educated, St. Catherines High School and Collegiate Institute; married, Solon, Ohio, Aug. 24, 1881, Elizabeth M. Harper; issue, Fred H., Edwin H., Ethel M., and Grace E., at the age of 20, engaged in the printing and publishing business; was editor and publisher of the St. Catherines Daily and Weekly News; issued Sundayschool papers, church weeklies, and Government periodicals, and conducted a book and stationery store; came to Cleveland in 1888, forming business partnership with Short & Forman, now The Forman-Bassett Co.; when in Canada, was identified with the Reform party; personally and through his newspapers took an active part in politics; Republican for twenty-five years; served one term on “The Committee of Fifteen”; was never a candidate for any office; sec’y The Forman-Bassett Co.; member Masonic Order, and the Chamber of Commerce; a grandson of Hiram Leavenworth, who went to Canada in 1826, to conduct the Government printing office; he was connected with William Hamilton Merritt and Sir William McKenzie, through whose united efforts The Welland Canal was constructed; the Leavenworth family have been prominent in the military, political and educational history of the Eastern and Middle States for 200...

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Caroline J. Todd Leavenworth of Chicago IL

LEAVENWORTH, Caroline J. Todd7, (Loyal F.6, Justus L.5, Gideon4, Gideon3, Michael2, Christopher1) born Aug. 12, 1833, married Oct. 9, 1856, Boardman Leavenworth, who died some years later. She is now (1913) living in Chicago, Ill. Children: I. Loyal Francis, b. March 19, 1859; he is in the wholesale grocery business; married and had two sons. II. Easter Ives, b. Feb. 18, 1863; she lives with her mother in Chicago,...

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Olive Ellen Todd Humiston

HUMISTON, Olive Ellen Todd8 , (Erastus7, Aden6, Edmund5, Christopher4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Nov. 19, 1834, married in 1855, Darius, son of John and Loly (Tuttle) Humiston, who was born in 1833, died Aug. 8, 1886. Children: I. Glenwood Carlisle, b. in Southington, Conn., March 30, 1859, d. July 4, 1868. II. Emma Genevieve, b. Sept. 12, 1860, in Wolcott, Conn., m. George Leavenworth. Issue: (1) Bertrand Humiston, b. Feb. 24, 1884. III. Warren Todd, b. June 21, 1862, in Wolcott, Conn., m. Dec. 25, 1888, Isabel Munson, who was b. May 1862. Issue: (1) Glenwood Warren, b. Oct. 2, 1889; (2) Ralph Carlisle, b. June, 1891; (3) Clyde Myron, b. Sept., 1892; (4) Ellsworth Munson, b. July, 1894; (5) Joseph Harold, b. Aug.,...

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