Surname: Lapham

Descendants of John Washburn of Duxbury, MA

The Washburn name in this country is a distinguished one. Perhaps it is as yet only a tradition that John Washburn, the ancestor of the Washburns here considered, was he who first served as secretary of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Several governors of our States have borne the Washburn name and at one and the same time four of the name occupied seats in the United States Congress. And the branch of the Massachusetts Washburns seated in Middleboro and vicinity have borne no small part in the annals of the Old Colony and later Commonwealth. Capt. Amos Washburn was in command of a company in the American Revolution; one of his sons, a graduate of Harvard, was a talented lawyer at Middleboro; Edward Washburn, brother of Capt. Amos, was another patriot in the Continental army; and his son, Gen. Abiel Washburn, was one of the leading men of his time in Middleboro, the acknowledged leader of the Federal party, and for thirty-six years held commissions through the different grades of office in the State militia; while Luther, Cyrus and the late Bradford Sumner Washburn, in turn, were substantial citizens of the town, and the latter’s son, Judge Nathan Washburn, lawyer and present Justice of the Courts of Plymouth county, is giving a good account of himself.

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Hussey and Morgan Families of New Bedford MA

HUSSEY-MORGAN (New Bedford families). These families, while not among those early here, are of approximately a hundred years’ standing in this community, and with their allied connections are among the very respectable and wealthy families of the locality, the heads of two of these families here considered being the late George Hussey and Charles Wain Morgan, who were extensively engaged in whaling and shipping interests here in New Bedford through much of the first half of the nineteenth century. Here follows in detail arranged chronologically from the first American ancestor the Hussey genealogy, together with that of some of its allied connections, et cetera. Christopher Hussey, baptized 18th of 2d month, 1599, at Dorking, County of Surrey, England, son of John and Mary (Wood) of that place, and for a time in Holland, married Theodate, daughter of Stephen Batchelder, and came from London to New England in the same vessel with Mr. Batchelder, arriving at Boston in the “William and Francis,” in 1632. He probably remained at Lynn, where his father-in-law was sometime minister, until 1636, then went to Newbury and there resided a year or two. He was deputy in 1637, was one of the original settlers of Hampton in 1638, at which time his mother was there with him, and was active and prominent in citizenship for many years; was town clerk in 1650; selectman in 1650-58-64-68;...

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Will of Nancy Austin

WILL-Nancy Austin: In the name of God, Amen. I, Nancy Austin of sound mind and disposing memory, but weak in body, do make and publish this as my last will and Testament. In the first place I give to my Grandsons, Fielding Jones and Isaac Vanmeter Jones, a negro girl of the name of Margaritte, and negro boy by the name of Solomon to be equally divided between them when the arrive at the age of 21 years or without lawful issue, then and in that case my will and desire is that the survivor have the aforesaid negroes with their increase and should both die without lawful issue, then and that case my will and desire is that the aforesaid negroes and their increase go to my three children and their lawful heirs. Secondly, I give to my daughter, Harriet Lapham, a negro girl of the name of Mahala, and a boy of the name of Washington, and girl of the name Julian. Thirdly, I give to my son, Daniel Vanmeter, a negro boy of the name of Alexander, and a negro woman of the name of Teresa, and the horses he claims being 3 in number, and 3 steers, and the hogs he claims, and one bed and furniture. Fourthly: I give to my daughter, Helen Jones, a negro girl of the name of Sarah, and a...

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Biography of Amos S. Lapham

Amos S. Lapham. There are but few members of the bar of Southeastern Kansas who have exceeded the record of Amos S. Lapham, of Chanute, for length and continuity of service, for devotion to the best ethics of the profession and for connection with important litigation. His standing is that of one of the foremost members of the bar of this part of the state. Judge Lapham was born on a farm in Champaign County, Ohio, April 6, 1845, and is a son of Oziel and Mahala (Steere) Lapham, and belongs to one of America’s old and honored families. John Lapham, the great-great-great-great-grandfather of Judge Lapham, was born in 1635, in Devonshire, England, and came to America prior to 1673, for on April 6, of that year, he was married at Providence, Rhode Island, to Mary, the daughter of William Mann. He lived at Providence and Newport, Rhode Island, and Dartmouth, Massachusetts. In the same year he was a freeman and deputy to the general assembly, and in 1675 was constable. He owned several hundred acres of land in the vicinity of Providence, but in 1676, at the outbreak of King Philip’s war, removed to Dartmouth, Massachusetts. He was a large landholder for his day, and at the time of his death, in 1710, his estate, of which his wife Mary and son John were executors, was found to...

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Biographical Sketch of Nathan D. Lapham

Nathan D. Lapham, attorney and counselor at law in Geneva, Ontario county, New York, has not alone gained a reputation as a civil and criminal lawyer, but has for a number of years been prominently identified with public affairs in his section of the country. It is owing to the energy, ambition and progressive ideas of men of this stamp that many greatly needed improvements are introduced into the commonwealth, and their influence is a widespread one, extending far beyond the confines of their own generation and lives. (I) Nathan Lapham, grandfather of Nathan D. Lapham, and the ancestor for whom he was named, was a descendant of ancestors who held membership in the Society of Friends of the Massachusetts branch. Nathan Lapham was the owner of a fine homestead in Wayne county, New York, which was in the possession of the family for many years. He was a farmer of the old school, with a decided readiness to adopt modern ideas wherever they proved...

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Biographical Sketch of De Witt C. Lapham

(II) De Witt C., son of Nathan Lapham, was born in Macedon, Wayne county, New York, in 1846, and died on the family homestead in 1909. He was engaged in agricultural pursuits during the active years of his life, and was prominent in the public affairs of the community, having filled with ability a number of local offices. He was a staunch supporter of the Republican party, and his religious affiliations were with the Methodist church. He married Amelia J. Finley, born in 1847, now (1911) residing in the village of Macedon, daughter of David Finley, of the same...

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Biography of Nathan D. Lapham

(III) Nathan D., son of De Witt C. and Amelia J. (Finley) Lapham, was born in Macedon, Wayne county, New York, November 14, 1871. From his earliest years he was of a studious nature and made the best possible use of the educational advantages afforded by the Macedon Academy, of which he was a graduate. Subsequently he was a student in the Cornell Law School, from which he was graduated in the class of 1895, this institution awarding him a post-graduate scholarship. He was admitted to the bar December 26, 1895, and he established himself in the practice of his profession in the spring of 1896, at Lyons, New York, in association with Clyde W. Knapp, who is at present the county judge of Wayne county, the firm being known as Knapp & Lapham, and being dissolved after a period of two years. During 1899-98 Mr. Lapham served as clerk of the board of supervisors, and after the dissolution of his partnership with Mr. Knapp he practiced independently at Lyons until 1902, when he sold his interests to B. S. Rude. On November 13, 1904, he removed to Geneva, New York, where he commenced practicing his profession and won almost immediate recognition for the excellence of his methods. During his six years practice in Geneva he has been called upon to serve as the counsel in seven murder trials,...

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