Surname: Knox

A History of Waterloo New York Newspapers

The pioneer printer of Seneca County was George Lewis, who, in the year 1815, started in the village of Ovid a small sheet entitled the Seneca Patriot. The office of publication was located on Seneca Street, in the upper story of a building on whose site the engine-house now stands. At the close of a single volume, Mr. Lewis changed the name of his paper to The Ovid Gazette, and when Elisha Williams secured the removal of the County seat to Waterloo, Lewis removed hither with his press in May, 1817, and continued the issue of his paper as...

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Natchez Trace

In 1792, in a council held at Chickasaw Bluffs, where Memphis, Tennessee, is now located, a treaty was made with the Chickasaws, in which they granted the United States the right of way through their territory for a public road to be opened from Nashville, Tennessee, to Natchez, Mississippi. This road was long known, and no doubt, remembered by many at the present time by the name “Natchez Trace.” It crossed the Tennessee River at a point then known as “Colberts Ferry,” and passed through the present counties of Tishomingo, Ittiwamba, Lee, Pantotoc, Chickasaw, Choctaw, thence on to Natchez,...

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Bloody Scenes in Alabama and Georgia

At this period, some exciting scenes occurred in the region now known as North Alabama. We have already followed a party of emigrants to the Cumberland. Many others flocked to that country, and it soon became well settled, for a wild country. The Upper Creeks and Cherokees continually made war upon these Cumberland people. The French, upon the Wabash, had, for a long time, carried on a commerce, near the sites of the present towns of Tuscumbia and Florence. So long as M. Viez was at the head of this trade, the Cumberland people were not harassed; but, recently, he had been succeeded by others, who supplied the Indians with arms, and encouraged them to attack the American settlements. The latter had only acted upon the defensive, but it was now determined to advance upon the frontier towns of the Indians. June 1 1787: One hundred and thirty men assembled, from different parts of the Cumberland region, and marched, under Colonel James Robertson, to the Tennessee river, piloted by two Chickasaws. David Hays was dispatched from Nashville with boats, laden with provisions, destined for the Muscle Shoals. Descending the Cumberland, he was furiously attacked by the Indians, at the mouth of Duck River, and, after some of his men had been killed and others wounded, he returned to Nashville with his boats. Owing to this the horsemen were without...

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1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George...

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Biography of David Knox

David Knox was born in Ireland, in 1700. He had a son named Andrew, who was born in 1728. In 1732 Mr. Knox came to America, bringing his little son with him, and settled in Philadelphia County, Pa. Andrew married Isabella White, of Pennsylvania, and they had-Robert, David, Martha, James, John, William, Mary, and Andrew, Jr. Mr. Knox was a soldier in the revolutionary war, and having taken an active part in the events of the day, a reward was offered for him, dead or alive, by the British authorities. On the night of the 14th of February, 1778, he was at home visiting his family, and during the night his house was surrounded by a party of Tories, who had come to capture him for the reward. They announced their presence by firing a volley of balls through the door, and then broke it down with the breeches of their guns. But before they could affect an entrance, Mr. Knox and his son Robert met them with drawn sabers, and laid about them so vigorously that they were soon glad to retreat, with several of their party bleeding from the gashes and cuts they had received. Some American troops in the vicinity were notified of the attack, and immediately started in pursuit. Several of the wounded were captured, as they could be easily traced by the blood on...

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Biography of Stanford Chapman

Missouri Few men have lived more quietly and unostentatiously than Mr. Stanford Chapman, and yet few have exerted a more salutary influence upon the immediate society in which they move, or impressed a community with a more profound reliance on their honor, ability and sterling worth. His life has not been marked by startling or striking contrasts, but it has shown how a laudable ambition may be gratified when accompanied by pure motives, perseverance, industry and steadfastness of purpose. Mr. Chapman came originally from Tennessee, his birth occurring June 3, 1825. He is the son of Benjamin and Mary...

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Slave Narrative of Matilda Brooks

Interviewer: Alfred Farrell Person Interviewed: Matilda Brooks Location: Monticello, Florida Age: 79 A Governor’s Slave Matilda Brooks, 79, who lives in Monticello, Fla., was once a slave of a South Carolina governor. Mrs. Brooks was born in 1857 or 1858 in Edgefield, S.C. Her parents were Hawkins and Harriet Knox, and at the time of the birth of their daughter were slaves on a large plantation belonging to Governor Frank Pickens. On this plantation were raised cotton, corn, potatoes, tobacco, peas, wheat and truck products. As soon as Matilda was large enough to go into the fields she helped her parents with the farming. The former slave describes Governor Pickens as being ‘very good’ to his slaves. He supervised them personally, although official duties often made this difficult. He saw to it that their quarters were comfortable and that they always had sufficient food. When they became ill he would himself doctor on them with pills, castor oil, turpentine other remedies. Their diet consisted largely of potatoes, corn bread, syrup, greens, peas, and occasionally ham, fowl and other meats or poultry. Their chief beverage was coffee made from parched corn. Since there were no stoves during slavery, they cooked their foods in large iron pots suspended from racks built into the fireplaces. Fried foods were prepared in iron ‘spiders’, large frying pans with legs. These pans were placed over...

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Biography of Manasseh Stewart Knox

Manasseh Stewart Knox is one of the oldesb residents of Pottawatomie County. His own recollections of that district cover a period of sixty years, beginning in his early childhood. He knew Pottawatomie County when it was a virtual wilderness and when Kansas was still in the throes of the free stats struggle. Mr. Knox is one of the most substantial land holders and formerly one of the largest farmers in Northern Kansas and is president of the First National Bank of Havensville and had banking interests elsewhere. He was born in Cayuga County, New York, August 21, 1843. His ancestors were Scotch-Irish and English and were colonial settlers in Virginia, His grandfather, John Knox, was a native of Virginia and perhaps through disinclination to the institution of slavery he moved north into Pennsylvania, freeing his slaves. He became a farmer and millwright in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, where he died in 1845. His son, John Knox, Jr., served with the rank of colonel in the Civil war and was killed in battle. The founder of the family in Kansas was Charles S. Knox, who was born in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, in 1810. He grew up there and when a young man went to Cayuga County, New York, where he became a farmer and where he married. It was in June, 1857, that he joined the pioneers of Pottawatomie County, Kansas....

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Biographical Sketch of William Knox

Knox, William; architect; born, Glasgow, Scotland, Jan. 20, 1858; son of Thomas and Margaret Neilson Knox; studied in the Free Church Seminary, in Glasgow, special course in architecture in Glasgow and Edinburgh; married, Painesville, O., June 21, 1891, Miss Agnes Julia Child; issue, three children, Carlos C., Beulah G., and M. Neilson; business career, successor to Mr. Aitken, in the firm of Moffett & Aitken, in Edinburgh; in 1886, left Scotland to travel; applied for and secured position with Burnham & Root, architects, of Chicago, Ill.; later office mgr. for Henry Ives Cobb, eminent architect; came to Cleveland in 1893; after a few months, formed partnership with J. H. Elliott, under firm name of Knox & Elliott; have been the architects for many fine buildings throughout the country and in the city, the Rockefeller Bldg., Trinity Congregational Church, building for the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, Elks’ Bldg., as well as numerous factories and beautiful residences; member American Ass’n for the Advancement of Science, Chamber of Commerce, Euclid, and Rowfant Clubs; interested in scientific research; has the finest collection of seaweed in the country; authority on the subject of...

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Knox, Janice S. “Jan” Samson Mrs. – Obituary

Janice S. “Jan” Knox, 60, of Haines, died Nov. 22, 2004, at her home. Her funeral will be Saturday at 11 a.m. at Coles Funeral Home, 1950 Place St. in Baker City. Mr. Tim Knox will officiate. Vault interment will follow at Mount Hope Cemetery. Visitations will be today until 7 p.m. at the funeral home. Jan was born June 7, 1944, in Baker City to Charles and Nada (Hickerson) Samson. She received her education in Baker City and lived in Bend for a time. She worked as a cook on a large ranch in Antelope. She also tended bar. She returned to Baker City and met Robert Knox. They were married May 14, 1976. She has since been a homemaker. Jan loved crafts of all kinds and she put a lot of her loving heart into making crocheted baby blankets for her grandchildren. She also made a lot of afghans for family and friends. She enjoyed gardening, and canning the fruits and vegetables she grew. Her planting and growing of her flowers and roses were an absolute joy to her, then watching the hummingbirds come to dine. She loved to fish, and when her husband Bob and she lived in Port Angeles, Wash., the salmon were put on the run because she always caught the biggest ones. Being in the mountains camping, hunting, and fishing with family and...

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Biography of Lorenzo V. Knox

Lorenzo V. Knox was a great merchant, assisted in building up a wholesale enterprise at Leavenworth which still exists, flourishes, and bears his name. In a broad public sense more important even than his achievements as a merchant were the efforts and influences which he directed to the general well being of his home city. He became actively identified with all that pertained to the material and moral welfare of the community. This was particularly manifested in his connection with educational affairs. For years Mr. Knox was a member of the Leavenworth school board, serving twelve years in all and part of the time as president of the board. The impress of his activities is a lasting benefit to the city educational institutions. Lorenzo V. Knox was born in the Berkshire Hills of Massachusetts November 6, 1841, and died at Leavenworth December 6, 1899, at the age of fifty-eight. His parents were Abijah B. and Abigail (Babcock) Knox. He was descended from William Knox, who came to America in colonial times and founded a home in Massachusetts. In his early boyhood Lorenzo V. Knox went with his parents to Westfield, Massachusetts, and while growing up he received a normal school training. For a time he was a teacher, and during the Civil war he was a member of the Signal Service Corps. It was in 1866 that he came...

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Rough Riders

Compiled military service records for 1,235 Rough Riders, including Teddy Roosevelt have been digitized. The records include individual jackets which give the name, organization, and rank of each soldier. They contain cards on which information from original records relating to the military service of the individual has been copied. Included in the main jacket are carded medical records, other documents which give personal information, and the description of the record from which the information was obtained.

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Biography of Charles Bishop Knox

Charles Bishop Knox, deceased, one of Rock Island’s pioneer citizens and a wide awake and conservative business man and politician in his days, was born at Blandford, Massachusetts, June 27, 1818, and died in Rock Island on May 28, 1890. Charles Bishop Knox was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Curtis B. Knox, who was one of the old respected families of Blandford. He acquired a common school education in the public schools of Blandford and Springfield, Massachusetts, and in 1841 came to the City of Rock Island direct from his native state. Having arrived here at this early day he was listed among the pioneer settlers of the county and soon became widely acquainted. After devoting much time to the study of embalming he entered the undertaking business in Rock Island in 1858 and continued in this business until May 28, 1890, which was the day of his demise. During this period of years he held public office, and in the execution of the duties of these, which he capably conducted, naturally won the esteem and admiration of all those with whom he dealt. His career in politics lead him into various offices of responsibility which he occupied for a number of years. Among the public offices held by him being County Coroner, county supervisor and alder-man of the City of Rock Island. Mr. Knox was a staunch...

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Biography of Edwin B. Knox

One of the earliest born residents of Rock Island County is Edwin B. Knox, of Moline. Since October 15, 1842, when he first saw the light of day at Rock Island, Mr. Knox has continuously made his home in one of these two cities or their immediate vicinity. At the time of his birth, Rock Island, then known as Stephenson, was but a fair sized village and Moline but a settlement. His parents, Charles B. and Mary (Gorham) Knox, then lived in the middle of the present block east of Twentieth street, opposite Spencer Square, and the son first attended school in a small brick school house in the middle of Spencer Square. Later he pursued his studies in the basement of the old Methodist Church, located in the early fifties in the northwest corner of the same square. He finished the common branches at what was the first high school erected in the city  at Seventh Avenue and Twenty-first Street. The parents of our subject came to Stephenson in the Spring of 1842, their financial resources consisting at the time they landed from the steamboat that had brought them from St. Louis, of a single shilling. The father, though a cabinet maker of ability, sought work at anything that offered, putting much of the time for the first two or three seasons digging wells for the new settlers,...

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