Surname: Kingsbury

Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

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People and Buildings of the Choctaw Nation

The missionaries found the precepts of the Choctaw’s to be moral; and also that they respected old age, and kept fresh in memory the wise councils of their; fathers, whose lessons of wisdom the experience of the past, taught their youthful minds to look upward, and whose teachings they did not forget in their mature years. Their tenderness to and watchful care of the aged and infirm was truly remarkable; they looked upon home and regarded their country as sacred institutions, and in the defense of which they freely staked their lives; they also inculcated a high regard for parents, and were always courteous by instinct as well as by teaching; they held in high veneration the names of the wise, the good, and the brave of their ancestors, and from their sentiment toward the dead grew sweet flowers in the heart. They believed that integrity alone was worthy of station, and that promotion should rest on capacity and faithfulness; they also had swift and sure methods of dealing with the incorrigible, official or private; nor were they impatient of the slow processes of the years but knew how to wait in faith and contentment; and if they were not as progressive, as our opinion demands in its rush for gain and pompous show, they had at least conquered the secret of National and individual steadfastness. Today we are...

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Missionaries Among the Choctaw

In 1832, at Hebron, the home of the missionary, Calvin Cushman and his family, was the place appointed for the assembling of all the Choctaws in that district preparatory to their exodus from their ancient domains to a place they knew not where; but toward the setting sun as arbitrary power had decreed. Sad and mournful indeed was their gathering together helpless and hopeless under the hand of a human power that knew no justice or mercy. I was an eyewitness to that scene of despairing woe and heard their sad refrain. I frequently visited their encampment and strolled from one part of it to another; while from every part of their wide extended camp, as I walked, gazed and wondered at the weird appearance of the scene, there came, borne upon the morn and evening breeze from every point of the vast encampment, faintly, yet distinctly, the plaintive sounds of weeping rising and falling in one strangely sad and melancholy chorus, then dying away in a last, long drawn wail. It was the Availing of the Choctaw women even as that of Rachel for her children. Around in different groups they sat with their children from whose quivering lips sobs and moans came in subdued unison; now, in wild concert united, their cries quivered and throbbed as they rose and fell on the night air, then dying away in...

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Death of Cyrus Kingsbury

Early in the year 1820, an English traveler from Liverpool, named Adam Hodgson, who had heard of the Elliot mission when at home, visited the mission, though he had to turn from his main route of travel the distance of sixty miles. He, at one time on his sixty miles route, employed a Choctaw to conduct him ten or twelve miles on his new way, which he did, then received his pay and left him to finish his journey alone. Of this Choctaw guide Mr. Hodgson, as an example of noble benevolence and faithful trust, states: “After going about...

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The Meeting of Folsom and Nittakachih

When the council, convened for the adjustment and final distribution of the annuity, adjourned in such confusion, together with the animosity manifested and openly expressed by both contending parties the one toward the other, (a similar scene never before witnessed in a Choctaw council) I feared the consequences that I was apprehensive would follow; but hoped that the conflicting opinions then agitating my people would be harmonized upon calm reflection and the adoption of wise and judicious measures. But when I ascertained that Nittakachih and Amosholihubih were truly assembling their warriors, I began to view the matter in its true and proper light. I knew those two chiefs too well to longer doubt the full interpretations of their designs as set forth in their actions; for they both were men who indulged not in meaningless parade, or delighted in empty display. Inevitable war kindred against kindred and brother against brother with all its horrors and irreparable consequences now seemed to stare me in the face, with no alternative but to speedily prepare to meet it; therefore Le Flore and myself, after due deliberation, resolved, if we must fight, to confine the fighting as much as possible within Amosholihubih’s and Nittakachih’s own districts. We at once took up our line of march south toward Demopolis, which was in the district of Amosholihubih, and where they had assembled their warriors. At...

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Aboha Kullo Humma

Aboha Kullo Humma, (pro. Ar-bo-hah ) (House; Kullo (strong) Humma (red) or, in our phraseology (Strong red house but in the Choctaw, Red Fort) was the chief of Okla Hunnali. The clans of the Choctaws were all perpetuated in the female line. When a man married, he was adopted into the family of his wife, and her brothers had more authority over her children than her husband; therefore, when a lover wished to marry a girl, he consulted her uncles, and if they consent to the marriage, the father and mother approved. Those of the same clan were never allowed to intermarry. A Choctaw regarded marrying a girl of his own clan with the same horror as the white man did to marry his own sister; and equally so did the Choctaw girl. Aboha Kullo Humma was highly elated at the proposition of Mr. Kingsbury to establish a school among his clans, or people; and earnestly importuned Mr. Kingsbury to establish two in his district; and such were his pleadings that Mr. Kingsbury finally agreed to write a letter to the; Prudential Committee, to solicit more teachers, and Aboha Kullo Humma also wrote a letter, and sent it with Mr. Kingsbury’s, a true copy of which I here insert: Six Towns, Choctaw Nation, October 18th, 1822. Brothers: “The first law I have made is, that when my warriors go over the line among the white people, and buy...

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Memoirs of John Pitchlynn

John Pitchlynn, the name of another white man who at an early day cast his lot among the Choctaws, not to be a curse but a true benefactor. He was contemporaneous with the three Folsom’s, Nathaniel, Ebenezer and Edmond; the three Nails, Henry, Adam and Edwin; the two Le Flores Lewis and Mitchel, and Lewis Durant. John Pitchlynn, as the others, married a Choctaw girl and thus become a bona-fide citizen of the Choctaw Nation. He was commissioned by Washington, as United States Interpreter for the Choctaws in 1786, in which capacity he served them long and faithfully. Whether...

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Missionaries among the Native Americans

According to traditional authority, the morning star of the Choctaws religious era, (if such it may be termed) first lit up their eastern horizon, upon the advent of the two great Wesley’s into the now State of Georgia in the year 1733, as the worthy and congenial companions of the noble Oglethorpe; but also, it flashed but a moment before their eyes as a beautiful meteor, then as quickly went out upon the return to England of those champions of the Cross, leaving them only to fruitless conjecture as to its import; nor was seen again during the revolutions of eighty-five long and weary years. Though tradition affirms, there were several missionaries (Roman Catholic) among the Choctaws in 1735; and that the Reverend Father Baudouin, the actual superior general of the mission resided eighteen years among the Choctaws. With these two above named exceptions, I have seen no record of the White Race ever manifesting any interest in the southern Indians welfare either of a temporal or spiritual nature, from the earliest trading posts established among them in 1670 by the Virginia and Carolina traders, down through slowly revolving years to that of 1815; at which time may be dated the establishment of the first Protestant mission among the southern Indians. This mission, which was named Brainard, was established among the Cherokees by Rev. Cyrus Kingsbury, under the jurisdiction of...

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The first conversion among the full blooded Choctaws was that of an aged man, who lived near Col. David Folsom, chief of the Choctaws, named Tun-a pin a-chuf-fa, (Our one weaver) hitherto as ignorant of the principles of the religion of Jesus Christ as it is possible to conceive. He manifested an interest in the subject of religion about six months before any other of his people in the neighborhood, and soon began to speak publicly in religious meetings, and gave evidence, by his daily walk and conversation, of a happy and glorious change, to the astonishment of his people, who could not comprehend the mystery. The old man, but now a new one, lived the life of a true and devoted Christian the few remaining years of, his life, and then died leaving bright evidence of having died the death of the righteous. When he was received into the church, he was baptized and given the name of one of the missionaries, viz.: William Hooper, by his own request, to whom Mr. Hooper had endeared himself by many acts of kindness conferred upon the aged and appreciative Choctaw. Shortly after he professed religion, he dictated a letter to Col. David Folsom, his nephew, which was written and translated into English by Mr. Loring Williams, of which the following is a copy: “Ai-Ik-Hum-A; Jan. 30, 1828,” (A place of learning.)...

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Biography of Paul Brigham

Hon. Paul Brigham, son of Paul and Catharine (Turner) Brigham, born in Coventry, Connecticut, January 17, 1746; married, October 3, 1767, Lydia Sawyer, of Hebron, Connecticut; came to Norwich from Coventry, in the spring of 1782, bringing his family with him, all of his children having been born in Connecticut. In 1788, he built the house on ”Brigham Hill,” for many years occupied by his great-granddaughter, the late Miss Louisa D. Brigham. The farm had been previously owned and occupied by Elihu Baxter. In what esteem Mr. Brigham was held by the people of his adopted state and town, is shown under appropriate heads in other places in this volume. Captain Paul Brigham in the Revolutionary Army, June-August 1777. Mr. Brigham served four years as Captain in the Continental Army in a Connecticut regiment commanded, first, by Colonel Chandler and afterwards by Colonel Isaac Sherman. He entered the Army January 1, 1777, and was discharged April 22, 1781. A portion of the time he served under the immediate command of Washington, and was engaged in the important battles of Germantown, Monmouth, and Fort Mifflin. He was enlisted by General McDougal from Coventry, Conn., and his regiment seems to have been largely composed of men from that section of the State. We have been privileged to read a fragment of a diary kept by Captain Brigham during a part of his...

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Biographical Sketch of Nathaniel Kingsbury

Nathaniel Kingsbury settled in the northern part of this town at an early day. He married four times. His son Abijah married Abigail, daughter of deacon Abijah Wilder. Josiah, one of his eleven children, married Eloise, daughter of Zadock and Sarah (Black) Taft, and resides in Keene. William Black, grandfather of Mrs. Josiah Kingsbury, was a pensioner of the Revolution, and the latter has some of the continental money which was paid to...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles Franklin Kingsbury

Charles Franklin Kingsbury was born in Gilsum June 11, 1824, being the third child of William and Temperance (Leonard). Kingsbury. Until the age of twenty he lived and worked on the farm, ‘having no opportunity for an education except the public schools of not more than ten or twelve weeks each winter. He was anxious for an education, and that he might have the means to attend an academy, spring and fall, he worked on the farm two or three months in summer, and taught school in the winter. In 1848 he entered Norwich University, Vt., where he remained three years, and then commenced the study of medicine with Dr. James G. Murphy, of Brattleboro, Vt. While prosecuting his studies he was engaged much in teaching in the towns of Marlboro, Alstead and Walpole. He attended medical lectures at Woodstock, Vt., and at Dartmouth Medical college, receiving his degree of M. D. in the latter institution, November, 1855. He practiced one year in Gilsum, four years in Stoddard, and in March, 1860, established himself in Lyme, Grafton county, where he has since remained. His success in the treatment of disease has brought an extensive practice, which the possession 0f an iron constitution has enabled him to endure. From 1872 to 1819 he was a member of the State Board 0f Agriculture. In 1882 he was elected county commissioner for...

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Biographical Sketch of Col. Cyrus Kingsbury

Col. Cyrus Kingsbury, from Worcester, Mass., came to Alstead in 1785. He married, first Annas S. Taynter, and second, Philete Partridge, rearing five sons and one daughter. He held a military commission for a considerable time, served as deacon of the Baptist church, and represented the town a number of years, and finally, in 1814, removed to Bloomfield, N. Y., where he soon after died. His family returned to Alstead. Cyrus, Jr., the only child of the Colonel’s first wife, though a cripple from his birth and ever afflicted with ill health, graduated at Brown University. R. a.. and subsequently at Andover Theological Seminary, and, in 1816, went as missionary among the Western Indians, where he spent the remainder of his life. He established a flourishing station among the Cherokees, called Brainard, and two among the Choctaws, called respectively, Elliot and Mayhew. Joseph, a half-brother of Cyrus, Jr., spent his life in Alstead. Originally a Whig in politics, he became a Republican on the organization of that party, represented the town in the legislature, and held various local offices. He died in 1865, aged seventy-six years. He married Keziah, daughter of Lieut. Ephraim Kingsbury, who bore him one son and five daughters. Two of the daughters, Clarissa (Mrs. William Howard), and H. Sophia P. (Mrs. T. Tufts), reside in town, and Harriet M. (Glickmyer), in Brooklyn, N. Y., and...

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Biographical Sketch of Absalom Kingsbury

Absalom Kingsbury, from Coventry, Conn., came to Alstead in 1771, and moved his family thither the following year. His first wife, Rebecca Rust, bore him eight sons and two daughters, the sons being as follows: Asa, Ebenezer, Ephraim, Obadiah, James, Elisha, Joshua and Amariah. His second wife was a widow Wilson. Asa studied medicine with Dr. Frink, of Keene, entered the Revolutionary service, and died at New York, in August, 1776, aged twenty-four years. Lieut. Ephraim, who continued on his father’s farm, married for his first wife, Kezia Richardson, of Wrentham, Mass., and for his second, Hannah Leonard, of Carver, Mass., by whom he had six daughters. Elisha K., married Phebe Beckwith, who bore him six sons and two daughters. Absalom served the town as justice of the peace, treasurer, and representative, and was instrumental in organizing the first...

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Biography of Selden B. Kingsbury

The profession of the law, when clothed with its true dignity and purity and strength, must rank first among the callings of men, for law rules the universe. The work of the legal profession is to formulate, to harmonize, to regulate, to adjust, to administer those rules and principles that underlie and permeate all government and society and control the varied relations of men. As thus viewed there attaches to the legal profession a nobleness that cannot but be reflected in the life of the true lawyer, who, rising to the responsibilities of his profession, and honest in the pursuit of his purpose, embraces the richness of learning, the profoundness of wisdom, the firmness of integrity and the purity of morals, together with the graces of modesty, courtesy and the general amenities of life. Of such a type Selden Bingham Kings-bury is a representative. For eighteen years he has practiced law in Idaho, and for five years has been a resident of Boise. Mr. Kingsbury was born in Camden, Lorain County, Ohio, on the 29th of October 1842, and is descended from New England ancestry. Members of the family became early settlers of Brockport, New York, and also of Lorain County, Ohio. Lemuel Kingsbury, the grandfather of our subject, valiantly aided the colonies in their struggle for independence, and lost a limb in battle. He attained the age of...

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