Surname: Kincaid

Muster Roll of Captain Hiram Burnham’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain Hiram Burnham’s Company of Light Infantry in the Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the third day of March, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Calais, Maine, to the sixth day of April, 1839, when discharged or mustered.

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Biographical Sketch of Edward C. Kincaid

(See Adair)-Edward C. Kincaid, born January 28, 1875. Married at Pryor March 31, 1906, Mary L, daughter of David and Lydia Givins. They are the parents of: Julia Pearl Kincaid, born April 29, 1908. Mr. Kincaid is a farmer, belongs to the Baptist church, is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen and Mutual Aid Society. Collins McDonald, born December 23, 1807. Married March 20, 1832, Naroena Adair born September 8, 1815. She died April 28, 1862, and he died November 5, 1895. Their daughter, Nancy Missouri McDonald, born November 31, 1849, married Joseph Kincaid, a native of Georgia and they were the parents of Edward C. Kincaid, the subject of this...

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Biographical Sketch of John Kincaid

John Kincaid was born in Guernsey county, Ohio, April 25, 1848, and is a son of Jacob and Elizabeth Kincaid, both natives of Ohio; the father is now living in Grundy county, this State, but his mother died in Morgan county, Ohio. Our subject accompanied his father to Grundy county in 1865 and. lived upon the farm there until January 19, 1878, when he was united in marriage to Miss Maria Vandalson, of Mercer county, Illinois, the Rev. Charles Atherton, officiating. Shortly after his marriage he removed to this county .and rented a farm in Jefferson township, and one year later purchased his present farm of eighty acres, which he, has under a fine state of cultivation. Mr. and Mrs. Kincaid have two children, whose names and dates of birth are here given: Claude, born November 2, 1878; and Carrie P., born March Z, 1881. They are highly respected citizens of the...

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Biographies of the Cherokee Indians

Whatever may be their origins in antiquity, the Cherokees are generally thought to be a Southeastern tribe, with roots in Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee, among other states, though many Cherokees are identified today with Oklahoma, to which they had been forcibly removed by treaty in the 1830s, or with the lands of the Eastern Band of Cherokees in western North Carolina. The largest of the so-called Five Civilized Tribes, which also included Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks, and Seminoles, the Cherokees were the first tribe to have a written language, and by 1820 they had even adopted a form of...

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Biography of Harrison Rittenhouse Kincaid

HARRISON RITTENHOUSE KINCAID. – This well-known journalist of Oregon, the emanations of whose pen have appeared either originally or as selections in almost every newspaper of the state, is the eldest son of Thomas and Nancy Kincaid, pioneers of 1853, and was born in Madison county, Indiana, January 3, 1836. At the age of seventeen he came with his parents to our state, and with them made his home in Lane county. Among his early labors was work on the mill-race at the present site of Springfield. In 1855 he made a trip to Southern Oregon to operate in the mines, but was soon after driven out by the Indians. He was led by this venture to a journey on foot to Crescent City and a voyage the next season to San Francisco in a little steamer known as the Goliah. The wandering life of the miner was hereupon assumed; and manual labor of all kinds was resorted to as a temporary means of support. The typography, general resources and society of California on the American Sacramento and Yuba rivers, and at length at San Francisco, were very thoroughly examined. From the Golden City he returned to his home in Oregon in 1857, and, being desirous of improving the home place, set to work logging with oxen, and thereby obtained from the mill sufficient lumber to build a house...

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Biography of John Francis Kincaid

JOHN FRANCIS KINCAID. – This gentleman is the oldest son of William and Nancy J. Woolery Kincaid, and was born in Marion county, Missouri, December 6, 1838. His parents were both natives of Madison county, Kentucky, and came to Missouri in 1830. His mother died in 1850; and in 1853 he left his birthplace, and in company with his father, three brothers and three sisters started with ox-teams to cross the plains to Oregon. They left home on March 25th, and had a large train, known as the Kincaid train, the first which came through the Nahchess Pass, and arrived in Steilveron about October 10, 1853. On January 1, 1854, Mr. Kincaid took up his Donation claim of one hundred and sixty acres, where the town of Sumner is now located, and was among the first settlers of the Puyallup valley, his notification on the claim being number forty-four after the formation of the territory. He built his residence where his orchard now stands, and began to clear the farm through a dense forest of underbrush and timber, and succeeded in making a beautiful home. Mr. Kincaid, senior, died at his home in 1870, full of faith in the future, and beloved by his family and friends. Our subject stayed at home until twenty-one years of age. On the breaking out of the Indian war, the family, having suffered...

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Biography of Hon. Orvin Kincaid

HON. ORVIN KINCAID. – Mr. Kincaid’s life has embodied very much of the rough romance of an untamed and mining country, and in its entirety would read like a tail of Arabia. He is a native of the granite state, having been born in Grafton, New Hampshire, in 1821. His father, a man of powerful physique, a blacksmith of Scotch-Irish parentage, gave him a training both at school and at the forge, and took the boy with him on his removals to Massachusetts and Vermont. Upon reaching his majority young Kincaid spent eighteen months in Ohio and the old West, but returned to Vermont for a few more years in school. In 1844, together with his father and a brother, he came to Wisconsin, establishing a blacksmith shop at Beloit, and three years later at Portage City, and finished his life in that state as a farmer at Otsego. In 1852 the great impulse that brought so many men to the Pacific seized him also; and joining a train of eighty wagons he journeyed steadily westward, performing an average of twenty-two and one-half miles per day over the old emigrant road. At Soda Springs, near Fort Hall, however, he found it necessary to dispose of his interest in the wagon to which he was attached. Taking a few crackers and dried beef as provisions, and one blanket, he continued...

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