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Surname: Kendig

History of Seneca County New York

This history of Seneca County, New York published in 1876, provides a look at the first 75 years of existence for this county, with numerous chapters devoted to it’s early history. The value of this manuscript may be found in the etched engravings found throughout of idyllic scenes of Seneca County including portraits of men, houses, buildings, farms, and scenery. Included are 35 biographies of early settlers, and histories of the individual townships along with lists of men involved in the Union Army during the Civil War on a township by township basis.

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Seneca County New York Biographies

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now In the 1980’s a series of newsletters were published four times a year by Seneca County NY featuring historical information concerning Seneca county and her past residents. The current historian for Seneca County placed these online using PDF files. One of the main features of each edition were biographical sketches of early settlers of Seneca County. Unfortunately, while they provided an index inside of a spreadsheet for the 189 biographies, it is difficult for the average user to quickly get around. I’ve taken their spreadsheet and...

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Treaty of August 20, 1851

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now TREATY MADE AND CONCLUDED AT CAMP LU-PI-YU-MA, AT CLEAR LAKE, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AUGUST 20, 1851, BETWEEN REDICK McKEE, INDIAN AGENT ON THE PART OF THE UNITED STATES, AND THE CHIEFS, CAPTAINS AND HEAD MEN OF THE CA-LA-NA-PO, HA-BI-NA-PO, ETC., ETC., TRIBES OF INDIANS. A treaty of peace and friendship made and concluded at Camp Lu-pi-yu-ma, on the south side of Clear Lake, between Redick McKee, one of the Indian agents specially appointed to make treaties with the various Indian tribes in California, on the part of the United States, and the under-signed chiefs, captains and head men of the tribes or bands of Indians now in council at this camp, known as the Ca-la-na-po tribe, represented by the chief, Ju-lio and captains; Ha-bi-na-po tribe, represented by the chief, Pri-e-to and his captains; Da-no-ha-bo tribe, represented by the chief, Ku-kee; Mo-al-kai tribe, represented by the chief, Mob-shah and his captains; the co-tribe, represented by the chief, Cal-i-a-him and his captains; How-ku-ma tribe, represented by the chief, Chi-bec and his captains; Cha-nel-kai tribe, represented by the chief, Con-chu; and the Me-dam-a-dec tribe, represented by the chief, Co-e~u-e. ARTICLE 1. The said tribes or bands acknowledge themselves, jointly and severally, under the exclusive jurisdiction, authority, and protection of the United States, and hereby bind themselves to refrain hereafter...

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