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Surname: Kemp

Index to Articles found in the El Farol Newspaper 1905-1906

The Lincoln County New Mexico online archives contains pdf’s of all remaining copies of the El Farol Newspaper of Capitan NM, but doesn’t have an index to the newspaper. C. W. Barnum, an active member of AHGP, and state coordinator for the New Mexico AHGP recently invested his time and energy into providing an every person index to the various extant issues. He has shared this wonderful index with AccessGenealogy in hopes that it will reach a wider audience. Enjoy!

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Seabury Family of New Bedford, Massachusetts

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now SEABURY – variously spelled Sebury, Saberry, Saberrey and Sabury. The American ancestor of the Seaburys of New Bedford was (I) John Seabury, of Boston, who died before 1662. He married Grace, and had two sons – John (who went to Barbados) and Samuel (born Dec. 10, 1640) – and several daughters. (II) Samuel Seabury, son of John, born Dec. 10, 1640, died Aug. 5, 1681. He married at Weymouth Nov. 9, 1660, Patience Kemp, who died Oct. 29, 1676. He married (second) April 4, 1677, Martha...

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1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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Biographical Sketch of John H. Kemp

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John H. Kemp was born in Daviess county, June 24, 1847, and is a son of John and Ellen Kemp, the former a native of Indiana, and the latter of Virginia, who came to this county in 1838. They had six children, as follows: John H., the subject of this sketch, Francis M., Mary J., Martha E., and Martin L. John H. Kemp lives on the old homestead, and his mother lives with him; his father died in March, 1865. John H. Kemp was married, November 22, 1877, to Miss Amelia J. Brown, who was born in this county March 2, 1858, and died May, 1879. They had one child, Etna, born April 29,...

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Slave Narrative of Jane Montgomery

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Jane Montgomery Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Homer, Louisiana Date of Birth: March 15, 1857 Age: 80 I was born March 15, 1857, in Homer, Louisiana. I claim to be 75 years old, but that’s jest my way of counting. My mother was Sarah Strong and my father was Edmond Beavers. We lived in a log cabin that had jest one door. I had two sisters named Peggy and Katie. Mammy was bought from the Strong family and my pappy was bought from Beavers by Mister Eason. We slept on wooden slabs which was jest make-shift beds. I didn’t do no work in slave times ’cause I was too little. You jest had to be good and husky to work on that place. I listened and told mammy everything I heerd. I ate right side dat old white woman on the flo’. I was a little busy-body. I don’t recollect eating in our quarters on Sunday and no other time. I don’t remember no possums and rabbits being on our place, ’cause when white folks killed a chicken for their selves, dey killed one for the niggers. My pappy never ate no cornbread in all his put-together. Meat was my favorite food. I never ate no dry bread without no meat. We...

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Slave Narrative of “Prophet” John Henry Kemp

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: L. Rebecca Baker Person Interviewed: “Prophet” John Henry Kemp Location: Daytona Beach, Florida Age: 80 A long grey beard, a pair of piercing owl-like eyes and large bare feet, mark “Prophet” Kemp among the citizenry of Daytona Beach, Florida. The “Prophet”, christened John Henry–as nearly as he can remember–is an 80 year old ex-slave whose remininiscences of the past, delight all those who can prevail upon him to talk of his early life on the plantation of the section. “Prophet” Kemp does not talk only of the past, however, his conversation turns to the future; he believes himself to be equally competent to talk of the future, and talks more of the latter if permitted. Oketibbeha County, Mississippi was the birthplace of the “Prophet”. The first master he can remember was John Gay, owner of a plantation of some 2,700 acres and over 100 slaves and a heavy drinker. The “Prophet” calls Gay “father”, and becomes very vague when asked if this title is a blood tie or a name of which he is generally known. According to Kemp–Gay was one of the meanest plantation owners in the entire section, and frequently voiced his pride in being able to employ the cruelest overseers that could be found in all Mississippi. Among these were such men...

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Biography of Col. John J. Kemp

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now COL. JOHN J. KEMP, deceased. The influence of a good man will be ever expanding with the lapse of time, and his deeds of charity and acts of kindness will live to commemorate his name and perpetuate his memory. It can be truly said that a good man has been gathered to his fathers, but his virtues live after him, and his name is everywhere mentioned with respect and honor. He was born in middle Tennessee August 6, 1818, and his death occurred May 31, 1893. His early education was obtained in the State of his birth, and having been brought up to the occupations of farming and stock raising, he followed them throughout life. Upon coming to Arkansas he settled at Flatwoods, in what is now Stone County, and over forty years ago took up his residence in Richwoods. By the judicious exercise of both brain and brawn he cleared up what is now one of the finest farms in the county, if not the finest, containing 480 acres, all of which is extremely fertile. He was very successful in his chosen calling, and was one of the very first in this section to introduce a good grade of horses, cattle, mules and hogs. He lost heavily during the Civil War, but afterward retrieved his...

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Kemp, Philip – Obituary

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Philip Kemp, 85, of Enterprise and a former Baker City resident, died Tuesday, Jan. 18, 2005 at his home. Arrangements are under the direction of Gray’s West & Co. Used with permission from: The Record Courier, Baker City, Oregon, January, 2005 Transcribed by: Belva...

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Biographical Sketch of George C. Kemp

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now George C. Kemp, farmer and stock; P. O. Arcola; the subject of this sketch was born in Ohio Co., Ind., Aug. 25, 1846. He married Miss Minerva D. Stone Oct. 14, 1866; she was born same place Dec. 6, 1845. They have three children, viz., Theodore, born April 16, 1869; Laura B., born Dec. 4, 1875, and Charles C., born Nov. 8, 1877. He lived in Indiana until September, 1868, when he came to his present place; he owns 349 acres in this township, which includes the original 200 acres given him by his father Ezra, who located it in quite a novel way-setting out from Indiana on horse, he stopped over Sunday with a farmer living in the timber about eight miles east of here, of whom he learned there was vacant land about eight miles west, but no one there to show it, and no marks to distinguish either land or distance; but they conceived the plan of putting the horse at a certain pace and keep him westward for a certain time, when he would be on the land, and in this way located the same; he (Ezra Kemp) married Miss Tryphena Scranton; both were natives of Ohio Co., Ind., where they were married; he died Feb. 1, 1870; she is living in...

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