Surname: James

Memoirs of Nathaniel Folsom

I will here present to the reader the memoirs of Nathaniel Folsom the oldest of the three brothers who cast their lot in their morning” of life among” the Choctaws, and became the fathers of the Folsom House in the Choctaw Nation, as related by himself to the missionary, Rev. Cyrus Byington, June, 1823, and furnished me by his grand-daughter Czarena Folsom, now Mrs. Rabb. “I was born in North Carolina, Rowan County, May 17th, 1756. My father was born in Massachusetts or Connecticut. My mother was born in New Jersey. My parents moved to Georgia, and there my father sent me to school about six months, during which time I learned to read and write. My mother taught me to read and spell at home. My father had a great desire to go to Mississippi to get money; they said money grew on bushes! We got off and came into the Choctaw Nation. The whole family came; we hired an Indian pilot who led us through the Nation to Pearl River, where we met three of our neighbors who were re turning on account of sickness. This alarmed my father, who then determined to return to North Carolina. We came back into the Nation to Mr. Welch’s, on Bok Tuklo (Two Creeks), the father of Mr. Nail. At this time I was about 19 years of age. At...

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Seneca County New York Biographies

In the 1980’s a series of newsletters were published four times a year by Seneca County NY featuring historical information concerning Seneca county and her past residents. The current historian for Seneca County placed these online using PDF files. One of the main features of each edition were biographical sketches of early settlers of Seneca County. Unfortunately, while they provided an index inside of a spreadsheet for the 189 biographies, it is difficult for the average user to quickly get around. I’ve taken their spreadsheet and linked each edition to the PDF file. Once you’ve found the biography you...

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Coal County Oklahoma Cemeteries

Most of these Coal County Oklahoma cemeteries are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we provide the listing when it is only a partial listing. Hosted at Coal County OKGenWeb Archives Byrd’s Prairie Cemetery Cairo Cemetery Centrahoma Cemetery Coalgate Cemetery Globe Cemetery McCarty Cemetery Pine Cemetery Pleasant Grove Cemetery Hosted at Coal County OKGenWeb Byrds Prairie Cemetery Centrahoma Cemetery Coalgate Cemetery Lonestar Cemetery McCarty Cemetery Moore Cemetery Ninas Cemetery Nixon Cemetery Panther Creek Cemetery Plesant Grove Cemetery Wilson Cemetery Woodman Cemetery Hosted at Coal County Oklahoma ALHN Boiling Springs Cemetery Byrds Prairie Cemetery Cairo Cemetery...

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Genealogy of Peter Spracklin

Apparently the name Spracklin had other forms: Spartling, Sprackling. In English or Welsh it meant “the one with the crooked legs.” As far as known to the writer, some early Spracklins on English records were of the Canterbury Catholic Church, Canterbury, County Kent, England. The church records there show a Robert, baptized 1645, son of Spratling; Adam, baptized 1653, son of Robert Spratling. Heraldic arms were granted in 1619 to Leonardus Sprackling, Rob’tus Sprackling, and Adam Sprackling, of Thanet, Co. Kent. Possibly this Robert Spracklin was an early ancestor of Peter Spracklin who came to America in 1823. Peter’s youngest son George named one of his sons George Robert. The genealogy which follows begins with this Peter Spracklin who came in 1823–seven generations back from the author. The first Peter who came was a tanner–a job of preparing hides for shoes or boots which took 18 to 24 months to prepare. Arms created in 1619 for individual at that time. Arms.–Sa, a saltier erm. betw. four leopards’ faces or. Crest.–An heraldic tiger’s 24 head, erased, sa. ducally gorged, maned, and armed, or. Before September 30, 1823 Peter and Elizabeth Andrews Spracklin came from Pitney, Co. Somerset, England on the schooner Cane under the command of Halliday to the New York port. On those passenger records,, Peter Spracklin was listed as 48 years of age and his occupation listed as a tanner. Included with Peter were...

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Slave Narrative of Mary Moriah Anne Susanna James

Interviewer: Rogers Person Interviewed: Mary James Date of Interview: Sept. 23, 1937 Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Residence: 618 Haw St., Baltimore, MD Reference: Personal interview with Mary James, ex-slave, Sept. 23, 1937, at her home, 618 Haw St., Baltimore, Md. “My father’s name was Caleb Harris James, and my mother’s name was Mary Moriah. Both of them were owned by Silas Thornton Randolph, a distant relative of Patrick Henry. I have seen the picture of Patrick Henry many a time in the home place on the library wall. I had three sisters and two brothers. Two of my sisters were sold to a slave dealer from Georgia, one died in 1870. One brother ran away and the other joined the Union Army; he died in the Soldiers’ Home in Washington in 1932 at the age of 84. “How let me ask you, who told you about me? I knew that a stranger was coming, my nose has been itching for several days. How about my home life in Virginia, we lived on the James River in Virginia, on a farm containing more than 8,000 acres, fronting 3-1/2 miles on the river, with a landing where boats used to come to load tobacco and unload goods for the farm. “The quarters where we lived on the plantation called Randolph Manor were built like horse stables that you see on...

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Slave Narrative of James Calhart James

Person Interviewed: James Calhart James Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Residence: 2460 Druid Hill Ave., Baltimore, MD Reference: Personal interview with James Calhart James, ex-slave, at his home, 2460 Druid Hill Ave., Baltimore. “My father’s name was Franklin Pearce Randolph of Virginia, a descendant of the Randolphs of Virginia who migrated to South Carolina and located near Fort Sumter, the fort that was surrendered to the Confederates in 1851 or the beginning of the Civil War. My mother’s name was Lottie Virginia James, daughter of an Indian and a slave woman, born on the Rapidan River in Virginia about 1823 or 24, I do not know which; she was a woman of fine features and very light in complexion with beautiful, long black hair. She was purchased by her master and taken to South Carolina when about 15 years old. She was the private maid of Mrs. Randolph until she died and then continued as housekeeper for her master, while there and in that capacity I was born on the Randolph’s plantation August 23, 1846. I was a half brother to the children of the Randolphs, four in number. After I was born mother and I lived in the servants’ quarters of the big house enjoying many pleasures that the other slaves did not: eating and sleeping in the big house, playing and associating with my half-brothers and sisters....

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Slave Narrative of Nan Stewart

Interviewer: Sarah Probst Person Interviewed: Nan Stewart Location: Ohio Place of Birth: Charleston, West Virginia Date of Birth: February 1850 Age: 87 Sarah Probst, Reporter Audrey Meighen, Author-Editor Jun 9, 1937 Folklore Meigs County, District Three [HW: Middeport] “I’se bawned Charl’stun, West Virginia in February 1850.” “My mammy’s name? Hur name wuz Kath’run Paine an’ she wuz bawned down Jackson County, Virginia. My pappy wuz John James, a coopah an’ he wuz bawned at Rock Creek, West Virginia. He cum’d ovah heah with Lightburn’s Retreat. Dey all crossed de ribah at Buffington Island. Yes, I had two bruthahs and three sistahs. Deir wuz Jim, Thomas, he refugeed from Charl’stun to Pum’roy and it tuk him fo’ months, den de wuz sistah Adah, Carrie an’ Ella. When I rite young I wurked as hous’ maid fo’ numbah quality white folks an’ latah on I wuz nurs’ fo’ de chilluns in sum homes, heah abouts.” “Oh, de slaves quartahs, dey wuz undah de sam’ ruf with Marse Hunt’s big hous’ but in de back. When I’se littl’ I sleeped in a trun’l bed. My mammy wuz mighty ‘ticlar an’ clean, why she made us chilluns wash ouah feets ebry night fo’ we git into de bed.” “When Marse Hunt muved up to Charl’stun, my mammy and pappy liv’ in log cabin.” “My gran’ mammy, duz I ‘member hur? Honey chile, I...

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Biographical Sketch of Curtes H. James

James, Curtes H., Cornwall, was born in Weybridge, Vt., on June 21, 1848. His parents were Samuel and Salome (Hurd) James. Samuel James was born in Weybridge, Vt., on the place now owned by his son John A. James. Curtes H. James was educated at the common schools, and also at the Burr and Burton Seminary, at Manchester, Vt., which he attended one or two terms. He was brought up to farming and remained at home until the time of his marriage, which occurred on March 9, 1871, to Catherine C. Jewett, who was a daughter of Philo Jewett, a well-known resident of Weybridge, Vt. In 1871 he purchased the place where he has since resided, and which was the former home of the Rev. Jedediah Bushnell. He occupies a very fine residence, and there are many fine farm buildings in connection with the farm, which consists of 130 acres. Mr. James has been lister several terms. He has one son and three...

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Biography of Edward Thomas James

Among the veterans of the great Civil war who came in numbers to Kansas following the end of strife, was Edward Thomas James, whose useful and honorable life closed on December 6, 1915. For almost a half century he was one of the representative men of Shawnee County, an active force in the development of this section and one who will long be remembered for his sterling traits of character. Edward Thomas James was born in Talbot County, Maryland, August 27, 1830. At the time of his death he was the only survivor of his parents’ family of three children. His only sister died in infancy. Between himself and his brother W. Lambert, three years his junior, there existed the closest affection until the latter’s death. In his youth Mr. James had only limited educational opportunities but a love of reading and contact with many phases of life provided him with information on every subject and caused him in later years to be chosen for offices of trust and responsibility in his community. In 1857 he moved with his family to Indiana and shortly after Civil war was declared he enlisted for service in the Union army, becoming a member of the Ninth Indiana Infantry. He fell sick and was- granted a furlough but subsequently re-enlisted and continued in the army until the close of the war. In 1867,...

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Biographical Sketch of Joseph H. James

Joseph H. James, harness dealer, was born in Iowa County, Wis., in 1856, learned his trade at Mineral Point, and in Feb., 1877, moved to Webster City, Ia. In June, 1879, he came to Sac City and purchased the business and stock of Lewis Vanderworker; has since purchased building and lot. He employs three men and carries a full stock of harness, saddles, robes, blankets, whips, etc. In the spring of 1880 he established a branch shop at Newell, Buena Vista County, which is the only one at that...

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Biographical Sketch of E. F. James

E.F. James, dealer in agricultural implements, pumps, windmills, etc., is a native of Pa., lived during youth in Ill.; moved to Missouri Valley, Ia., in 1868. He engaged in railroading, until 1873, when he engaged in his present business; is also proprietor of the James line of drays and express...

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Biography of David M. James

DAVID M. JAMES. There are few features of business enterprise which contribute a larger quota to the convenience of the residential and transient public than the well-appointed livery stable, and a valuable acquisition to the town of West Plains, Missouri, is the establishment of this kind owned and conducted by David M. James. This gentleman owes his nativity to Henry County, Kentucky, where he was born in 1833, a son of Dr. Beverly W. and Matilda (Day) James, natives of the old State of Virginia and Kentucky, respectively. When a young man Dr. James removed to Kentucky and was there married to Mary Eubank, who died soon after, and after this event he moved to Kentucky, where he eventually married Miss Matilda Day. He was a man of more than ordinary intellectual ability and learning, and as a physician was very successful and well liked. Prior to the birth of the subject of this sketch he lived for a time in Bloomington, Indiana, where he taught school, but afterward returned to Kentucky and lived in several different counties. He at one time edited a paper in Newcastle, Kentucky, and then one in Charlestown, Indiana, and was for some years associate judge of the Charlestown, (Indiana) Circuit Court. He was a strong Union man during the war, but took no part in the struggle; was a Democrat in politics and...

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Biographical Sketch of Benjamin James

Benjamin James married Nancy Fourt, of Kentucky, and settled in (now) Warren County in 1811. He joined the rangers during the Indian war, and saw some active service. His children were William, John, Walter, and Peter. John fell from a mill dam on Charrette creek, and was drowned. Peter lived in St. Louis County, and never married. Walter married Sally Wyatt, and they had Frank, Mary A., William J., John, Elizabeth, Walter R., Joseph, and...

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James, Clinton Gilbert – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon Clinton Gilbert James, 30, of La Grande died Jan. 5 at his home. Services are planned for 1 p.m. Saturday at the Assembly of God Christian Life Center, 14th and Alder, Elgin. Arrangements are under the direction of Loveland Funeral Chapel. Mr. James, who was known as C.J., was born Apr. 6, 1976, in Yuba City, Calif., to Donald Scott and Carla Jean Pillow James. He was raised and educated in Olivehurst, Calif. He enjoyed hunting, wildlife, ROTC, drawing, reading, music, movies and hanging out with friends. He also loved dogs, playing X-Box and working on cars. Survivors include his father and step-mother, Donald and Bonnie James of Olivehurst; his fiancée, Amy McGinness of La Grande; one son, Clinton Gilbert James II of Pratt, Kan.; siblings, Jason Gray of Sacramento, Calif., Adam James of La Grande and Chris Woods, Donald James Jr. and Sheila Hankins, all of Olivehurst; and several nieces, nephews, aunts and uncles. The Observer – Obituaries for the week ending Jan. 13, 2006, Published: January 13,...

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