Surname: Jacobs

Index to Articles found in the El Farol Newspaper 1905-1906

The Lincoln County New Mexico online archives contains pdf’s of all remaining copies of the El Farol Newspaper of Capitan NM, but doesn’t have an index to the newspaper. C. W. Barnum, an active member of AHGP, and state coordinator for the New Mexico AHGP recently invested his time and energy into providing an every person index to the various extant issues. He has shared this wonderful index with AccessGenealogy in hopes that it will reach a wider audience. Enjoy!

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Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

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Earliest Known Traders on Arkansas River

With the help of contemporary records it is possible to identify some of the early traders at the Mouth of the Verdigris. Even before the Louisiana Purchase, hardy French adventurers ascended the Arkansas in their little boats, hunting, trapping, and trading with the Indians, and recorded their presence if not their identity in the nomenclature of the adjacent country and streams, now sadly corrupted by their English-speaking successors. 1Many tributaries of Arkansas River originally bore French names. There was the Fourche La Feve named for a French family [Thwaites, R. G., editor, Early Western Travels, vol. xiii, 156]; the...

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The Settlers of Narraguagus Valley Maine

A glance at the map of the western part of Washington County will show that any treatment of the early settlement upon the Narraguagus River, necessarily involves more or less of the histories of Steuben, Milbridge, Harrington and Cherryfield. Steuben was formerly township “No. 4, East of Union River,” and No. 5 comprised the territory now included in the towns of Milbridge and Harrington. The town of Cherryfield is composed of No. 11, Middle Division, Brigham Purchase, and of the northeastern part of what was formerly Steuben. All that part of Cherryfield lying south of the mills on the...

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Muster Roll of Captain Albion P. Arnold’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain Albion P. Arnold’s Company of Artillery in th6 Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service “by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the twenty-fifth day of February, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Augusta, Maine, to the seventeenth day of April, 1839, when discharged or mustered. Captain Albion P. Arnold. Lieutenant Charles B. Bates. Sergeants George W. Armstrong, Sylvanus Fairbanks. Rufus K. Lane. John S. Morrill. Corporals Daniel F. Ayer. William P. Caldwell. Cyrus C. Fairbanks. William Walker. Musicians Charles E. Hodges. Sumner Smith. Privates Allen, George. Allen, Josiah. Atwood, George M Blaisdell, Orrin W. Brown, John W. Butler, Samuel. Campbell, Rufus. Choate, James R. Dudley, Stephen. Earle, Joseph. Fogg, Francis A. Follett, John E. Folsom, Cyrus H. Haines, George W. Hall, Samuel P. Hammond, George W, Jacobs, John. Knowles, Augustus. Knowles, John. Lawton, Daniel. Leeman, Moses D. Lyon, William. Melvin, Adorno L. Moody, Edlon D. Moshier, Stephen. Page, Charles R. Page, David L. Patch, Jonathan. Perkins, William. Pinkham, William, Quint, Ivory. Ramsdell, Harvey. Russell, Samuel B. Stanley, George W. Webster, Nathan. Whittier, Jonathan, Wiggin, James M. Yeaton, Phineas,...

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History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa

History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa together with sketches of their cities, villages and townships, educational, civil, military and political history; portraits of prominent persons, and 641 biographies of representative citizens. Also included is a history of Iowa embracing accounts of the pre-historic races, and a brief review of its civil and military history.

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Appalachian Colonists from the Mediterranean Basin

Throughout the Southeastern United States can be found “old families” in rural areas whose appearance is not quite the same as the European or African peoples who colonized the region, but also not what a person with substantial indigenous ancestry looks like either. In earlier times they might have called themselves Cajun, Black Irish, Redbone, Black Dutch, Portughee, Old Spanish, Melungeon or Part Injun. In more recent years they are likely to say that their great-grandmother was a full blooded Choctaw, Cherokee, Creek, Chickasaw, Catawba, Shawnee or Blackfoot. She may have been, but that is not always the case....

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Bartlett Family Genealogy

Typing on six onion skinned papers, Ralph Sylvester Bartlett presented his lineage in the early 1900’s. His Bartlett family were early pioneers in Kittery Maine in the section later known as Eliot Maine. Whether he ever meant to compile these pages into book form is left for you to interpret, but somebody did eventually compile the 6 pages they had of his family tree. We provide the entire 6 pages in digital format below the transcription.

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Narrative of Marie Le Roy and Barbara Leininger

The Narrative of Mary le Roy and Barbara Leininger. Who for four and a half years were captive among the Indians, and on the 6th May 1759 arrived happy in this city. From her own lips never written and promoted to the Press. This manuscript gives an account of the captivity and escape of these two girls, whose families lived on Penn’s Creek, in the present Union County, Pennsylvania. It also provides a lengthy list of names of other prisoners met by the two ladies in their captivity.

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Cattaraugus Indian Reservation Map and Occupants, 1890

The Cattaraugus Reservation, in Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, and Erie Counties, New York, as delineated on the map, occupies both sides of Cattaraugus creek. It is 9.5 miles long on a direct east and west line, averages 3 miles in width at the center, dropping at is eastern line an additional rectangle of 2 by 3 miles. A 6-mile strip on the north and 2 “mile blocks” at diagonal corners are occupied by white people, and litigation is pending as to their rights and responsibilities. The Seneca Nation claims that the permit or grant under which said lands were occupied and...

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Biographical Sketch of John Jacobs

John Jacobs, of Germany, came to America and settled in Virginia, where he married Sarah Crawford. Their children were David, John, Peter, William, Elizabeth C., and Susan H. William married Margaret A., daughter of Daniel McDaniel and Mary Anderson, who were natives of Edinburgh, Scotland. By her he had Charles A., George R., Mary, Anna, Sallie, Sophia, and Catharine H. Mr. Jacobs died in Virginia in 1828, and in 1831 his widow removed to Missouri and settled in Montgomery County, where she died in 1850. Charles, who was a wealthy merchant of New Orleans, died without marrying. George R., who was a physician, married Louisa Parsons, of Virginia, and settled in Montgomery Co., Mo., in 1831, but subsequently removed to Boone County. Mary and Anna died single, in Montgomery County, one in 1843 and the other in 1844. Sophia married Dr. Gorge Y. Bast, of New Florence. Catharine H. married Henry Clark,...

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Biographical Sketch of Judge Isaac Jacobs

Isaac Jacobs was born January 26, 1854, in Sculliville County, Choctaw Nation, oldest son of S. L. Jacobs and C. Belvin, both of Choctaw origin. Isaac attended public school until the age of fourteen years. At seventeen he commenced farming, which, in connection with stock raising, he continues until the present day. In October 1889, he started in the mercantile business with his brother, W. F. Jacobs, at Muldrow, and they are now doing a very fair trade. Mr. Jacobs married Miss Amanda Pettit, of Sequoyah district, daughter of Thomas Pettit, a prominent Cherokee in his neighborhood. Mrs. Jacobs died in August 1880, without family, since which time Mr. Jacobs has remained single. In 1887 he was appointed deputy clerk of Sequoyah district, and August 1889, was elected district judge. In August 1891, he was re-elected for a second term, and is filling his office to the satisfaction of all. Judge Jacobs is five feet six inches in height and weighs 140 pounds. He is a man of strict integrity, and highly respected in the country, having a host of friends among all classes. Judge Jacobs owns 125 acres of land in cultivation, a small herd of cattle, and, in connection with his brother, carries a stock of merchandise to the value of $2,000. They also own the store building, while the judge is owner of a nice residence...

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Biography of Math. Jacobs

Math. Jacobs, the well known and popular president of the Kendrick State Bank, is a native of Minnesota, and for several years has been prominently connected with the business interests of this section of Idaho. He was born in St. Cloud, May 1, 1865, and is of German descent, his parents, Theodore and Elizabeth Jacobs, having both been natives of the Fatherland. When young people they crossed the Atlantic to America, locating in Minnesota, where they were married in 1856. Theodore Jacobs became a successful farmer and carried on agricultural pursuits until 1898, when his death occurred, at the age of sixty-two years. He left a widow and nine children. Mrs. Jacobs now resides in Gene-see, Idaho, at the age of sixty-one years. , Math. Jacobs was reared and educated in the state of his nativity, and in 1884 came to Idaho, where he entered the employ of J. P. Vollmer one of the most extensive merchants of the northern section of the state. He remained in Mr. Vollmer’s store in Uniontown for five years and was then made manager of his store in Kendrick conducting the large mercantile business here for two years. Since that time he has been actively connected with the banking business, and is now at the head of the State Bank, one of the most reliable financial institutions in this locality. Its business policy...

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Biography of William Jacobs, M. D.

William Jacobs, M. D. By the activities of a long and successful career Dr. William Jacobs is identified with the great plains period of the West before railroads were built across the continent, also with business and official affairs, and had for more than forty years been a resident of Washington County and only recently retired from an active practice as a physician and surgeon. Doctor Jacobs is still active in affairs as president of the Farmers State Bank of Washington. He was born at St. Louis, Missouri, December 19, 1844, and is now in his seventy-third year. His grand-father, Frederick Jacobs, was a native of Germany and brought his family to America in 1835, settling on a farm in Missouri. He died there in 1848. Fred Jacobs, father of Doctor Jacobs, was born in Germany in 1820 and was fifteen years of age when he came with his parents to America. They settled on the Missouri River near Washington, Missouri, where he grew up and married. He gave his active years to farming as a vocation. After his first marriage he lived in Warren County, Missouri, but in the fall of 1864 went to Nebraska as a pioneer and lived in Pawnee County, that state. On the death of his first wife in 1871 he made his home with his son Doctor William until 1876 when he married...

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