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Surname: Jackson

Slave Narrative of Elsie Pryor

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The first Mistis I remember was named Mary Ellis, she was part Choctaw Indian. I don’t remember ole Marster at all. When ole Miss’s daughter got married, ole Miss give her a little nigger girl. That was me an’ when I was a little thing, too. I don’t remember who young Miss married. They didn’t tell little niggers nothin’, we just found out what we could and din’t pay much tention to that. An’ not much ‘tention to what we saw. We was jes like little varmints. They’d cut arm holes and head holes in croker sacks and tell us to put them on and go along to work and we did, too. That was the only garment we would wear. We’d go ‘long totin’ in chips, and wood and just anything they had for us to do. I was sold so many times I hardly knew who my marster and mistis were. First good price come ‘long, away I’d go. They said I was nine years old when the niggers were freed. I din’t know ’cause I couldn’t read nor spell nor nothing. I only knew what they told me and they didn’t tell us little niggers much, and they’d give us a whack up the side of the head if we asked too many...

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Slave Narrative of Henrietta Jackson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Virginia Tulley Person Interviewed: Henrietta Jackson Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana Virginia Tulley District #2 Fort Wayne, Indiana EX-SLAVE OF ALLEN COUNTY [MRS. HENRIETTA JACKSON] References: A. Ft. Wayne News Sentinel November 21, 1931 B. Personal interview [TR: There are no ‘A’ and ‘B’ annotations in the interview.] Mrs. Henrietta Jackson, Fort Wayne resident, is distinguished for two reasons; she is a centennarian and an ex-slave. Residing with her daughter, Mrs. Jackson is very active and helps her daughter, who operates a restaurant, do some of the lighter work. At the time I called, an August afternoon of over 90 degrees temperature, Mrs. Jackson was busy sweeping the floor. A little, rather stooped, shrunken body, Mrs. Jackson gets around slowly but without the aid of a cane or support of any kind. She wears a long dark cotton dress with a bandana on her head with is now quite gray. Her skin is walnut brown her eyes peering brightly through the wrinkles. She is intelligent, alert, cordial, very much interested in all that goes on about her. Just how old Mrs. Jackson is, she herself doesn’t know, but she thinks she is about 105 years old. She looks much younger. Her youngest child is 73 and she had nine, two of whom were twins. Born a...

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Biography of Fred Schuyle Jackson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Fred Schuyle Jackson, of Topeka, prominent lawyer, former congressman, ex-attorney-general of Kansas, is one of the many able men who have made Kansas notable as a commonwealth. His father was Martin Van Buren Jackson, who bore a conspicuous part in the border warfare of Kansas. Fred S. Jackson was born April 19, 1868, and his birth occurred in the block house at Stanton near Osawatomie. His early education came chiefly from the public schools of Miami and Greenwood counties, and of earlier experiences and service readered should be mentioned five years spent in the schoolroom as a teacher, In the meantime he read law, and in 1891 was admitted to the bar. In order to equip himself the better for his chosen profession he then became a student in the law department of the University of Kansas, where he was graduated with high credit. In the meantime he had begun practice at Eureka, and it required only a few years for a man of his excellent ability, his knowledge of men, and his high ambition to serve, to build up a large clientage and extend his reputation as a lawyer to many remote quarters of the state. After concluding his service in the office of county attorney, his abilities attracted the attention of C. C. Coleman,...

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Slave Narrative of Edd Shirley

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Lenneth Jones Person Interviewed: Edd Shirley Location: Kentucky Age: 97 Occupation:  Janitor Monroe County. Folklore. (Lenneth Jones-242) [HW: Essay] Uncle Edd Shirley (97): Janitor at Tompkinsville Drug Co. and Hospital, Tompkinsville, Ky. [TR: Information moved from bottom of page.] Slaves: I am 97 years old and am still working as janitor and support my family. My father was a white man and my mother was a colored lady. I was owned three different times, or rather was sold to three different families. I was first owned by the Waldens; then I was sold to a man by the name of Jackson, of Glasgow, Kentucky. Then my father, of this county, bought me. I have had many slave experiences. Some slaves were treated good, and some were treated awful bad by the white people; but most of them were treated good if they would do what their master told them to do. I onced saw a light colored gal tied to the rafters of a barn, and her master whipped her until blood ran down her back and made a large pool on the ground. And I have seen negro men tied to stakes drove in the ground and whipped because they would not mind their master; but most white folks were better to their slaves and...

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Slave Narrative of Jenny McKee

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Perry Larkey Person Interviewed: Jenny McKee Location: London, Kentucky Age: (about) 85 Mrs. Jenny McKee, of color, who lives just North of London can tell many interesting things of her life. “Aunt Jenny” as she is called, is about eighty-five years of age, and says she thinks she is older than that as she can remember many things of the slave days. She tells of the old “masters” home and the negro shacks all in a row behind the home. She has a scar on her forehead received when she was pushed by one of the other little slaves, upon a marble mantle place and received a deep wound in her head. The old negro lady slaves would sit in the door way of their little shacks and play with pieces of string, not knowing what else to do to pass off the time. They were never restless for they knew no other life than slavery. Aunt Jenny McKee was born in Texas though she doesn’t know what town she was born in. She remembers when her mother was sold into the hands of another slave owner, the name of the place was White Ranch Louisiana. Her mother married again, and this time she went by the name of Redman, her mother’s second husband was...

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Slave Narrative of Rev. Silas Jackson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Rogers Person Interviewed: Rev. Silas Jackson Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Birth: Virginia Date of Birth: 1846 or 47 Place of Residence: 1630 N. Gilmor St., Baltimore, Maryland Age: (about) 90 Reference: Personal interview with Rev. Silas Jackson, ex-slave, at his home, 1630 N. Gilmor St., Baltimore. “I was born at or near Ashbie’s Gap in Virginia, either in the year of 1846 or 47. I do not know which, but I will say I am 90 years of age. My father’s name was Sling and mother’s Sarah Louis. They were purchased by my master from a slave trader in Richmond, Virginia. My father was a man of large stature and my mother was tall and stately. They originally came from the Eastern Shore of Maryland, I think from the Legg estate, beyond that I do not know. I had three brothers and two sisters. My brothers older than I, and my sisters younger. Their names were Silas, Carter, Rap or Raymond, I do not remember; my sisters were Jane and Susie, both of whom are living in Virginia now. Only one I have ever seen and he came north with General Sherman, he died in 1925. He was a Baptist minister like myself. “The only things I know about my grandparents were: My grandfather...

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Slave Narrative of George Jackson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Bishop & Isleman Person Interviewed: George Jackson Location: Steubenville, Ohio Place of Birth: Loudon County, Virginia Date of Birth: Feb. 6, 1858 Age: 79 WPA in Ohio Federal Writers’ Project Bishop & Isleman Reporter: Bishop [HW: Revised] Topic: Ex-Slaves. Jefferson County, District #5 July 6, 1937 GEORGE JACKSON Ex-Slave, 79 years I was born in Loudon County, Virginny, Feb. 6, 1858. My mother’s name was Betsy Jackson. My father’s name was Henry Jackson. Dey were slaves and was born right der in Loudon County. I had 16 brothers and sisters. All of dem is dead. My brothers were Henry, Richard, Wesley, John and me; Sisters were Annie, Marion, Sarah Jane, Elizabeth, Alice, Cecila and Meryl. Der were three other chillun dat died when babies. I can remember Henry pullin’ me out of de fire. I’ve got scars on my leg yet. He was sold out of de family to a man dat was Wesley McGuest. Afterwards my brother was taken sick with small-pox and died. We lived on a big plantation right close to Bloomfield, Virginny. I was born in de storeroom close to massa’s home. It was called de weavin’ room-place where dey weaved cotton and yarn. My bed was like a little cradle bed and dey push it under de big bed at...

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Slave Narrative of George Conrad, Jr.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: George Conrad, Jr. Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Connersville, Harrison County, Kentucky Date of Birth: February 23, 1860 Age: 77 I was born February 23, 1860 at Connersville, Harrison County, Kentucky. I was born and lived just 13 miles from Pariah. My mother’s name is Rachel Conrad, born at Bourbon County, Kentucky. My father, George Conrad, was born at Bourbon County Kentucky. My grandmother’s name is Sallie Amos, and grandfather’s name is Peter Amos. My grandfather, his old Master freed his and he bought my grandmother, Aunt Liza and Uncle Cy. He made the money by freighting groceries from Ohio to Mayaville, Kentucky. Our Master was named Master Joe Conrad. We sometimes called him “Mos” Joe Conrad. Master Joe Conrad stayed in a big log house with weather. boarding on the outside. I was born in a log cabin. We slept in wooden beds with rope cords for slats, and the beds had curtains around them. You see my mother was the cook for the Master, and she cooked everything chicken, roasting ears. She cooked mostly everything we have now. They didn’t have stoves; they cooked in big ovens. She skillets had three legs. I can remember the first stove that we had. I guess I was about six years old. My...

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Slave Narrative of Francis Bridges

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Francis Bridges Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Red River County, Texas Date of Birth: 1864 Age: 73 Occupatio I was born in Red River County, Texas in 1864, and that makes me 73 years old. I had myself 75, and I went to my white folks and they counted it un and told me I was 73, but I always felt like I was older than that. My husband’s name is Henry Bridges. We was raised up children together and married. I had five sisters. My brother died here in Oklahoma about two years ago. He was a Fisher. Mary Russell, my sister, she lives in Parish, Texas; Willie Ann Poke, she lives in Greenville, Texas; Winnie Jackson, lives in Adonia, Texas, and Mattie White, my other sister, lives in Long Oak, Texas, White Hunt County. Our Master was named Master Travis Wright, and we all ate nearly the same thing. Such things as barbecued rabbits, coon, possums baked with sweet potatoes and all such as that. I used to hang round the kitchen. The cook, Mama Winnie Long, used to feed all us little niggers on the flo’, jest like little pigs, in tin cups and wooden spoons. We ate fish too, and I like to go fishing right this very...

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Slave Narrative of Jane Arrington

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Jane Arrington Location: 301 Fowle Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Date of Birth: December 18, 1852 Age: 84 I ort to be able to tell sumpin cause I wus twelve years old when dey had de surrender right up here in Raleigh. If I live to see dis coming December I will be eighty five years old. I was born on the 18th of December 1852. I belonged to Jackson May of Nash County. I wus born on de plantation near Tar River. Jackson May never married until I wus of a great big girl. He owned a lot of slaves; dere were eighty on de plantation before de surrender. He married Miss Becky Wilder, sister of Sam Wilder. De Wilders lived on a jining plantation to where I wus borned. Jackson May had so many niggers he let Billy Williams who had a plantation nearby have part of ’em. Marster Jackson he raised my father and bought my mother. My mother wus named Louisa May, and my father wus named Louis May. My mother had six chilluns, four boys and two girls. The boys were Richard, Farro, Caeser, and Fenner. De girls Rose and Jane. Jane, dats me. We lived in log houses with stick an’ dirt chimleys. They called...

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Biographical Sketch of Nathan Jackson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Nathan Jackson located on the east side of the road nearly across from Jacob Ingraham, and followed his occupation of blacksmithing. He was a soldier of the Revolution, and prided himself on enjoying the personal confidence of General...

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Biographical Sketch of Andrew Jackson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Jackson, Andrew, Panton, Vergennes p. o., was born in Addison, Vt., in 1822. He represented his town in 1868 and 1869, and has been selectman and lister. He is a general farmer, dairyman, stock grower, and shipper, and owns and occupies the homestead farm of 230 acres. He was married in 1846 to Eliza Clark, who died in 1878, leaving two children — Charles L., and Fred C. Andrew Jackson then married for his second wife Emily Frances Collins, of Ferrisburgh, Vt., on October 19, 1880. Andrew Jackson was a son of Hezekiah and Sarah (Allen) Jackson. Sarah was born in Vermont in 1792, and her husband, Hezekiah, was born in Stephentown, Rensselaer county, N. Y., in 1772, and died in 1860. They had a family of four children born to them, all of whom are now living. Hezekiah Jackson had five children by his first wife, all of whom are now dead. The four children whom he had by his second wife are Andrew, David, Charlotte, and Elmina. Hezekiah Jackson settled in this town before 1800, and was in the War of 1812 and 1814. Andrew’s paternal grandfather was Ephraim Jackson, who was an early settler in Vermont, and died at Addison,...

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Biography of Edward Jackson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now This gentleman, the descendant of an old New England family, was born in Redding, Connecticut, on the 20th of April, 1799. His parents being without wealth, his education at school and as an. apprentice was such as would enable him to earn his livelihood. His brilliant social qualities and engaging person rendered him a most agreeable companion, and won for him, while yet without fortune, the heart and hand of a young lady of more than ordinary talent, beauty, and social position, Miss Lydia Ann Sanford, of his native town. They were married in 1826 and at once turned westward to find a home in Niagara, Canada West. Here the loan of a hundred dollars furnished a stock for the commencement of his business, and by the end of the first year of his married life, in the establishment of his commercial character, and in the acquisition of a small capital of his own, he laid the foundations of his future prosperity. As the western peninsula of Ontario was now rapidly filling up with new settlements, he sought a more central point from which to push his trade, first in Ancaster, and finally, in 1830, in the incipient city of Hamilton. Here he gathered around him as apprentices in his trade a number of young men,...

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Biographical Sketch of S.B. Jackson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now S.B. Jackson, ex-sheriff of Woodbury County, was born in Pennsylvania in 1845; removed to Linn County, Iowa, in 1864; thence to this city and engaged in the real estate business. He was elected mayor in 1877, and served three terms; was elected sheriff in 1879; his term expiring with the beginning of the present year; Mr. Jackson served two years in the late war in Co. B., 17th Pennsylvania...

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Biography of Eleazer Jackson

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Eleazer Jackson was born May 12, 1736, married Rachel Pond in 1761, and came to Chesterfield about 1778. He settled upon the land which is now a part of the farm on which his grandson, Jay Jackson, resides, and which has always been, since 1778, owned by members of the Jackson family. He was selectman in 1782, ’83, ’87, ’88, ’93, ’96 and 1800, and representative in 1792, ’93 and ’97- In 1791 he was the delegate from Chesterfield for revising the constitution of the state. He died November 11, 1814. His children were Prudence, Jacob, Jarib, Lydia, Enoch, Elijah, Levi, Wilkes, James, and David. Enoch, born October 20, 1769, married Martha, daughter of Andrew Phillips, in 1799. Jay Jackson, son of Enoch, was born May 15, 1816, the youngest of eight children, and also the youngest of thirty grandchildren of Eleazor Jackson. He was born at the “Jackson Home”in Chesterfield, and of which for the last forty-eight years he has been proprietorHis early educational advantages were meagre, but with a brain and desire for knowledge, he has improved his opportunities, until he is surpassed by few in general literature and science. Having been early in life educated to farm work, and the care and growing of cattle, and the traffic therein, his attention has been...

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