Surname: Houston

Governor Houston’s Life Among the Indians

The year following his failure to secure the contract, Houston spent writing letters defending his acts and denouncing the officials who had been discharged. In addition to the Indian officials, he poured his wrath and denunciation on Colonel Hugh Love, a trader on the Verdigris whom Houston accused of being in league with the Indian Agent to rob the Creeks; Love replied to Houston with some spirited charges against the latter. Stung by the contents of an article appearing in a Nashville paper, in a burst of passion Houston gave to the press of Nashville a most intemperate letter, July 13, 1831, beginning:

Read More

Governor Houston at His Trading Post on the Verdigris

In February, 1828, the vanguard of Creek immigrants arrived at the Creek Agency on the Verdigris, in charge of Colonel Brearley, and they and the following members of the McIntosh party were located on a section of land that the Government promised in the treaty of 1826 to purchase for them. By the treaty of May 6, 1828, the Government assigned the Cherokee a great tract of land, to which they at once began to remove from their homes in Arkansas. The movement had been under way for some months when there appeared among the Indians the remarkable figure of Samuel Houston. The biographers of Houston have told the world next to nothing of his sojourn of three or four years in the Indian country, an interesting period when he was changing the entire course of his life and preparing for the part he was to play in the drama of Texas.

Read More

Peace Attempts with Western Prairie Indians, 1833

What was known as the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek was entered into in Mississippi with the Choctaw Indians September 27, 1830; 1Kappler, op. cit., vol. ii, 221. pursuant to the terms of the treaty, in 1832 the movement of the Choctaw to their new home between the Canadian and Red rivers was under way but they were in danger from incursions of the Comanche and Pani Picts 2Called by early French traders Pani Pique tattooed Pawnee, and known to the Kiowa and Comanche by names meaning Tattooed Faces. [U.S. Bureau of Ethnology, Handbook of American Indians, part ii,...

Read More

Washington Irving at Fort Gibson, 1832

The McIntosh Creeks had been located along Arkansas River near the Verdigris on fertile timbered land which they began at once to clear, cultivate, and transform into productive farms. The treaty of 1828 with the Cherokee gave the latter a great tract of land on both sides of Arkansas River embracing that on which the Creeks were located. This was accomplished by a blunder of the Government officials, in the language of the Secretary of War, 1U.S. House, Executive Documents, 22d congress, first session, no. 116, President’s Message submitting the memorial of the Creek Indians. “when we had not...

Read More

Earliest Known Traders on Arkansas River

With the help of contemporary records it is possible to identify some of the early traders at the Mouth of the Verdigris. Even before the Louisiana Purchase, hardy French adventurers ascended the Arkansas in their little boats, hunting, trapping, and trading with the Indians, and recorded their presence if not their identity in the nomenclature of the adjacent country and streams, now sadly corrupted by their English-speaking successors. 1Many tributaries of Arkansas River originally bore French names. There was the Fourche La Feve named for a French family [Thwaites, R. G., editor, Early Western Travels, vol. xiii, 156]; the...

Read More

Establishment of Fort Smith in 1817

The white population in Arkansas in 1817 had increased to several thousand, whose protection, as well as that of the Cherokee people living in that territory, from the continued hostilities of the Osage, required the establishment of a military post at the western border dividing the white settlements from the Osage. From Saint Louis came further news of threatened hostilities by the Osage near Clermont’s Town, and a report 1Niles Register, (Baltimore) vol. xiii, 176. that Major William Bradford with a detachment of United States riflemen, and accompanied by Major Long, topographical engineer, had left that city for the...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Lee Houston

(See Ward) Stella Lenora, daughter of Lovell Peabody and Johnanna (Powell) Ballard, born in Delaware District, August 23, 1900. Educated at Ketchum. Married at Siloam Springs, Arkansas, September 2, 1916, Lee, son of A. P. and Mary Houston, born July 26, 1892 in Berry County, Missouri. They are the parents of: Lillie May, born July 15, 1917 and Mary Ann Houston, born March 31, 1920. Mr. Houston is a farmer near Ketchum. Nancy, daughter of James and Sidney (Redding) Ward was born Jan. 29, 1830. Married Sept. 21, t845, Cal Dean GunĀ­ter, born March 30, 1818. He died March 27, 1898. They were the parents of Anna Eliza Gunter, born May 4, 1848 and married John Powell. Their daughter, Johnanna Powell was born February 15, 1869 and married February 28, 1899, Lovell Peabody Ballard, born January 27, 1879 in Benton County, Arkansas. She died August 20,...

Read More

Biography of Captain James Houston

Captain James Houston was born in 1747, and was an early and devoted friend of liberty. In the battle of Ramsour’s Mill, near the present town of Lincolnton, he took an active part, and by his undaunted courage greatly contributed to the defeat of the Tories on that occasion. During the engagement Captain Houston was severely wounded in the thigh, from the effects of which he never fully recovered. Seeing the man who inflicted the severe and painful wound he shot him in the back and killed him as he ran. When it was ascertained that Cornwallis had crossed the Catawba river at Cowan’s Ford, and was approaching with his army, the family of Captain Houston conveyed him to the “big swamp” in the immediate vicinity, known as “Purgatory,” and there concealed him until the British had marched quite through the country. When the British army passed the residence of Captain Houston some of them entered the yard and house, and threatened Mrs. Houston with death if she did not quickly inform them where her husband was, and also where her gold and silver and China ware were kept, using, at the same time, very course and vulgar language. Mrs. Houston, knowing something of “woman’s rights” in every civilized community, immediately asked the protection of an officer, who, obeying the better impulses of human nature, ordered the men into...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Luke Towns

Interviewer: Rachel A. Austin Person Interviewed: Luke Towns Location: Jacksonville, Florida Age: 100+(?) A Centenarian Luke Towns, a centenarian, now residing at 1335 West Eighth Street, Jacksonville, Florida, was the ninth child born to Maria and Like Towns, slaves, December 34, 1835, in a village in Tolberton County, Georgia. Mr. Town’s parents were owned by Governor Towns, whose name was taken by all the children born on the plantation; he states that he was placed on the public blocks for sale, and was purchased by a Mr. Mormon. At the marriage of Mr. Mormon’s daughter, Sarah, according to custom, he was given to this daughter as a wedding present, and thus became the slave and took the name of the Gulleys and lived with them until he became a young man at Smithville, Georgia, in Lee County. His chief work was that of carrying water, wood and working around the house when a youngster; often, he states he would hide in the woods to keep from working. Because his mother was a child-bearing woman, she did not know the hard labors of slavery, but had a small patch of cotton and a garden near the house to care for. “All of the others worked hard,” said he “but had kind masters who fed them well.” When asked if his mother were a christian, he replied “why yes: indeed she...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Dr. C. M. Houston

The C. M. Houston family is an old pioneer family, only three of this large family are living in the county at this time: Columbus, Julia and Mary. They are all married and are doing well, and are good citizens of Hopkins County. Miss Julia married Mark Fuqua; Miss Mary married John...

Read More

Biography of Chester C. Houston

Chester C. Houston. When he came to Elgin nearly twenty-five years ago Chester C. Houston still had his fortune to make, and he was first known among his fellow townsmen as a hard worker at any employment he took up, until he finally graduated into independent merchandising. He had made a success by studying the needs and demands of his customers and had built up the largest and only distinctive clothing store in the town. Mr. Houston was born at Orangeville, Cass County, Illinois, June 23, 1866, a son of W. T. and Sue C. (Gaines) Houston. In the maternal line he is of Scotch-Irish descent. The Houstons came originally from Wales, settled in Virginia during colonial days, and Mr. Houston’s grandfather, Isaac Houston, was born in Nelson County, Kentucky. During the War of 1812 he enlisted with the frontiersmen under General Jackson, and fought in the concluding battle of that war at New Orleans. For his services as a soldier his son, W. T. Houston, subsequently received a land grant. He finally removed to Illinois, was a pioneer farmer and distiller in that state, and he died in Cass County before Chester C. Houston was born. W. T. Houston was born in Nelson County, Kentucky, in 1831, and died at Elgin, Kansas, in 1909. His early years were spent in his native county and as a young man...

Read More

Biographies of the Cherokee Indians

Whatever may be their origins in antiquity, the Cherokees are generally thought to be a Southeastern tribe, with roots in Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee, among other states, though many Cherokees are identified today with Oklahoma, to which they had been forcibly removed by treaty in the 1830s, or with the lands of the Eastern Band of Cherokees in western North Carolina. The largest of the so-called Five Civilized Tribes, which also included Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks, and Seminoles, the Cherokees were the first tribe to have a written language, and by 1820 they had even adopted a form of...

Read More

Rough Riders

Compiled military service records for 1,235 Rough Riders, including Teddy Roosevelt have been digitized. The records include individual jackets which give the name, organization, and rank of each soldier. They contain cards on which information from original records relating to the military service of the individual has been copied. Included in the main jacket are carded medical records, other documents which give personal information, and the description of the record from which the information was obtained.

Read More

Biography of Samuel Dexter Houston

Samuel Dexter Houston. One of the very first settlers in Riley County, Kansas, was Samuel Dexter Houston, who located a claim on Wildcat Creek and built a cabin there, in December, 1853. He was one of the county’s foremost citizens for more than a half century and his name is linked with some of the most important events in its early history and with those of other representative men of his time. He was conspicuous in the councils that worked on the construction of the Kansas State Constitution. Samuel Dexter Houston was born at Columbus, Ohio, June 11, 1818, and died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Luke Parsons, at Salina, Kansas, February 29, 1910. He was a son of Caleb and Elizabeth (Purdy) Houston. His father was born in New Hampshire, from which state he emigrated to Ohio in 1812 and there married Elizabeth Purdy, who was a native of Pennsylvania. When Samuel Dexter Houston was twelve years old, his parents removed to Illinois and there he grew to manhood. His first visit to Riley County was made in the winter of 1853 and his impressions of the country were so favorable that he located a claim that was situated not far from the mouth of what is still known as Wildcat Creek. On the shore of this secluded little sheet of water he built his primitive...

Read More
  • 1
  • 2

Search

Subscribe to AccessGenealogy

Enter your email address to subscribe to AccessGenealogy and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 5,798 other subscribers

It takes a Village to grow a Family Tree!


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Recent Comments

Subscribe to AccessGenealogy

Enter your email address to subscribe to AccessGenealogy and receive notifications of new posts and databases by email.

Join 5,798 other subscribers

Pin It on Pinterest