Surname: Hood

Staples Family of Taunton, MA

STAPLES (Taunton family). The Staples name is one of long and honorable standing in New England and the country. The family has been a continuous one in the Bay State for two hundred and seventy and more years, and at Taunton, in this Commonwealth, have lived generation after generation of the name down to the present – a worthy race, one representative of the best type of citizenship. Such men in more recent generations as the two Sylvanus Staples, father and son, and the latter’s son Sylvanus Nelson Staples, and the two Ebenezer Staples and Abiel B. Staples –...

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Descendants of Joseph Borden of Fall River MA

BORDEN (Fall River family – line of Joseph, fourth generation). The Borden family is an ancient one both here in New England and over the water in old England, as well as one of historic interest and distinction. The New England branch has directly or indirectly traced the lineage of the American ancestor, Richard Borden, many generations back in English history. His first English forbear went over to England from Bourdonnay, Normandy, as a soldier under William the Conquerer, and after the battle of Hastings  – in A. D. 1066 – was assigned lands in the County of Kent,...

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Lowell Massachusetts Genealogy

Tracing ancestors in Lowell, Massachusetts online and for free has been greatly enhanced by the University of Massachusetts in Lowell which provided digitized version of a large quantity of the Lowell public records. Combined with the cemetery and census records available freely online, you should be able to easily trace your ancestors from the founding of Lowell in 1826 through 1940, the last year of available census records. To add color to the otherwise basic facts of your ancestors existence we provide free access to a wide range of manuscripts on the history of Lowell, it’s manufactures and residents.

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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Hamlin Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Aagaard, Geo. Wf. Marie. P. O. Exira, R. 5. O. 160 ac., sec. 20. (2.5.) Aagaard, Hans.Wf.Inger; ch.Sena, Bertha, Emmert. P. O. Hamlin, R. 1. O. 78 ac.. sec. 10; O.37 ac.,  sec. 15. (27.) Albertson, John. Wf. Esther. P. O. Exira. R. 120 ac., sec. 35. (5.) Owner, Jorgen Hansen. Andersen, A. H. Wf. Christena; A. Egidia and Alfred. P. O. Audubon, it. 4. O. 80 ac., sec. 18;O. 120 ac., sec. 17. (23.) Andersen, Andy. Wf. Alice. P....

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Claybank Cemetery Ozark Alabama

Margaret Claybank Cemetery is located about two miles from Ozark, Alabama on Ozark – Daleville Highway. This cemetery enumeration was performed in 1948 by Eustus Hayes and as such will provide details on headstones which may no longer be present in the cemetery. Lizzie E. Dowling June 25, 1853 – Oct 31, 1938. Wife of N. B. Dowling. N. B. Dowling Aug 15, 1853 – Mar 28, 1938. Hus of Lizzie E. Dowling. Leila Belle Dowling May 26, 1876 – Jan 14, 1933. Dau of S. L. & Sarah Jane Dowling. Samuel L. Dowling Nov 3, 1841 – Jan...

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Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to...

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Slave Narrative of Mrs. C. Hood

The Story of Mrs. C. Hood: Once upon a time during the Civil War my grandmother was alone with just one old faithful servant. The Union troops had just about taken everything she had, except three prize saddle horses and one coal black mare which she rode all the time. She was very fond of the mare and valued it very much. One night my grandmother heard a noise, and called old Joe to go to the barn and see what was the matter. As he was nearing the barn someone yelled “Halt”; and Joe being a black man and a servant, stopped just where he was. My grandmother, who had also heard the command, paid no attention whatsoever; she went straight through the dozen or more Union soldiers who were stealing her stock to the one who appeared to be the leader. He was holding her mare; she jerked the briddle from his hand, led her mare back to the kitchen door, where she held her the remainder of the night. A Story: When my mother was a girl she was staying with some kinfolks for one month. These people owned several slaves and among them was one old man-servant who was very old and had served out his usefulness. It was war time and food was scarce even for the white folks. The younger and stronger slaves...

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Abstracts of Wills on File in the City of New York Surrogate’s Office 1660-1680

Abstracts of wills on file in the surrogate’s office city of New York 1660-1680. From May 1787 to the present, county surrogate’s courts have recorded probates. However, the court of probates and court of chancery handled estates of deceased persons who died in one county but who owned property in another. An 1823 law mandated that all probates come under the jurisdiction of the county surrogate’s courts. Each surrogate’s court has a comprehensive index to all probate records, including the unrecorded probate packets. Interestingly enough, there are wills existing and on record at the Surrogate’s Office in New York City for the time-span of 1660-1680. Genealogical extracts of these wills have been provided below.

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Will of Thomas Hood – 1671

THOMAS HOOD, New York. “I, Thomas Hood, lately a souldier in ye Garrison of Fort James, being since my arrivall taken sick,” makes loving friends, Richard Patum and John Bugby, executors, and leaves them “my share of Log wood in the Ketch, ‘Society,’ now riding, at anchor in the road of New York, of which Thomas Edwards is master.” “I give ye summe of 300 guilders, wampum, or ye value thereof, to be spent among my fellow-souldiers in the Garrison of Fort James.” Legacies to friends John Clarke and Richard Charlton. Dated October 7, 1671. Witnesses, Francis Yates, John Laureson. Above executors were confirmed October 14, 1671. States that he had “formerly been a soldier, hut had lately come from the West Indies, in the ketch, ‘Society,’ and had a share of log wood, a chest of silks, and some other things.” LIBER 1-2, page...

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Biography of John C. Hood

John C. Hood, clerk of the circuit court of Racine County and a native of the city of Racine, was born October 18, 1869. a son of Samuel and Alice A. (Coy) Hood. The father, whose birth occurred in Oxford, Pennsylvania, was a son of Thomas Hood, also born in the Keystone state. In the year 1838 Thomas Hood brought his family to Racine and entered a government claim of one hundred and sixty acres near the city. With the pioneer development of the district he was closely associated and he became a prominent and influential resident of his Township. His son, Samuel Hood, embarked in the lumber business in Racine and was for many years proprietor of one of the leading lumber yards of the city, conducting a growing and profitable business. He was interested in all projects for the welfare and benefit of the community and at one time served on the school board. He married Alice A. Coy, a native of England and a daughter of John Coy, who came with his family to the United States in 1832, settling at Utica, New York. The year 1848 witnessed his arrival in Racine, after which he engaged in business here as a contractor. Both Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Hood were members of the Baptist church and in politics he was an earnest republican. He died September 21,...

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Biography of William C. Hood

William C. Hood, who since 1898 has been manager for the American Seating Company at Racine, was born in this city April 21, 1860, a son of Samuel and Alice (Coy) Hood. The father was a son of Thomas Hood, who came from New York to Racine in 1836, when the work of development and improvement had scarcely been begun in this section of the state. He secured government land and became one of the pioneer settlers of the district. Hood’s creek was named in his honor. His son, Samuel Hood, engaged in farming to the age of twenty-one years and afterward entered the employ of J. I. Case, with whom he remained for several years. Subsequently he established a lumberyard which he conducted for many years, carrying on a growing and profitable business. Later he retired and spent his last days in the enjoyment of well earned rest, passing away after reaching the eightieth milestone on life’s journey. His wife is also deceased. Mr. Hood had served as a member of the school board and was interested in all that pertained to public progress and improvement. At the time of the Civil war he became a member of the commissary department and in politics he was always a republican, standing loyally by the party which was the defense of the Union during the dark days of civil strife....

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Biography of Edward A. Hood

Edward A. Hood, cashier of the Greenleaf State Bank, had had an active career in Kansas for a number of years, at first in the lumber business and leter as a banker. Mr. Hood did not begin life as the son of a wealthy family, but had gained his opportanities by hard work and constant vigilance. He was born at Salem, Arkansas, October 5, 1878. His ancestors in the paternal line were Scotch people. His grandfather, Graham W. Hood, was born in Scotland, came to this country when a young man and settled in Missouri among the pioneers, and for a number of years was engaged in outfltting freighting trains across the plains. He died at Sedalia, Missouri, more than forty years ago. G. W. Hood, father of Edward A, was born at Sedalis, Missouri, in 1842, and was reared and married in that state. In 1863, at the age of twenty one, he enlisted in the Seventh Missouri Cavalry, a Union regiment, and was with it until the close of the war, fighting whackers and also in the campaign against Price through Missouri and Kansas. After the war he entered railroading and also took up the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal Church. From Missouri he went to Salem, Arkansas, thence to Little Rock, and in 1890 moved to Stockton, Kansas. He had been retired from the ministry since...

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Ralph W. Hood

Was called into limited service in the medical department at Rock Hill, S. C., Sept. 4, 1918, and sent to Camp Greenleaf, Ga. On Sept. 24, 1918, he was dispatched with a body of men to duty at USA General Hospital No. 16, New Haven, Conn. Private Hood served three months at duty in the medical department and because of physical disability was placed in the hospital for three months for observation and treatment. On April 1, 1919, he was returned to duty and immediately attached to the Quartermaster Corps, and two months later he was promoted to Sergt. and made Finance Sergt. for that Army Post. He received his discharge Aug. 29, 1919, and was retained in a civilian capacity at that Hospital to close out the finance features of that post, the hospital having been taken over by the United States Public Health Service. Sergt. Hood arrived in Charlotte about the middle of November last, after having completed his work at the...

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Biography of William Alexander Hood

William Alexander Hood brought his extensive experience as a manufacturer, mining operator and oil and gas producer to Independence about three years ago, and is now rated as one of the leading producers in that field and also conducts a large business as a general contractor. He is of old Southern stock, and his Scotch-Irish ancestors came from England to North Carolina in colonial times. William Alexander Hood was born in Birmingham, Alabama, October 6, 1876. His family connections in that great industrial center of the South have long been prominent in manufacturing and commercial affairs. His father, William Hood, a resident of Birmingham, was born in Mississippi in 1851, and afterwards moved to Birmingham, Alabama, where he married. While a merchant he has become extensively interested as a producer in the oil fields of both Kansas and Texas. He is a democrat and a chairman of the board of directors and board of stewards in his Methodist Church, and is also a member of the Masonic fraternity. William Hood married Vilanta Yielding, who was born in Alabama. Their children are: William Alexander; Ira, a merchant at Birmingham; Robert H., associated with his brother Ira at Birmingham; Nina, wife of G. T. Brazelton, who is in the real estate business at Birmingham; Walter H., a graduate with the degree LL. B. from Washington and Lee University and now a...

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William G. Hood

Private, 1st Class, 306th Engineers, Co. D, 81st Div.; of Wayne County; son of T. J. and Malinda Hood. Husband of Mrs. Minnie G. Hood. Entered service May 26, 1918, at Goldsboro, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson. Transferred to Camp Sevier. Mustered out at Camp Sevier, S. C., Dec. 11,...

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