Surname: Hodges

Kelley Family of New Bedford, MA

KELLEY (New Bedford family Haverhill branch). At New Bedford for several generations have lived what for designation may be termed the Haverhill-New Bedford Kelleys. Reference is made to some of the descendants of William Kelley and his wife Abigail (Cannon) Kelley, both natives of the town of Haverhill, one of whose sons, the late Henry C. Kelley, was in the earlier half of the nineteenth century a merchant in New Bedford, and his son, the present Charles Sampson Kelley, since young manhood has been one of the most active and useful citizens of the city, having coupled his name with most if not all of the projects which have tended to the developing and modernizing of the city, one whose efforts in this direction have been especially conspicuous; and who, as a business man, banker and broker, is the architect of his own successful career.

The name Kelley, which was originally spelled Kelleigh, can be traced back to a period prior to the Norman conquest, and its barons are undoubtedly descended from the ancient Britons. The principal manorial seat of the family in England has been for many centuries located in the small parish of Kelly (or Kelley) in Devonshire. Burke and Shirley both agree as to its great antiquity, and the latter asserts that the Kellys have been lords of the manor from the reign of Henry II. (1154-1189). All the Kelleys in New England prior to 1690, with the exception of David Kelley of Yarmouth, Mass., freeman, 1657, and possibly one other family, appear to have been of English origin, and in all probability were of the Devonshire stock.

Read More

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Read More

Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

Read More

Muster Roll of Captain Albion P. Arnold’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain Albion P. Arnold’s Company of Artillery in th6 Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service “by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the twenty-fifth day of February, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Augusta, Maine, to the seventeenth day of April, 1839, when discharged or mustered. Captain Albion P. Arnold. Lieutenant Charles B. Bates. Sergeants George W. Armstrong, Sylvanus Fairbanks. Rufus K. Lane. John S. Morrill. Corporals Daniel F. Ayer. William P. Caldwell. Cyrus C. Fairbanks. William Walker. Musicians Charles E. Hodges. Sumner Smith. Privates Allen, George. Allen, Josiah. Atwood, George M Blaisdell, Orrin W. Brown, John W. Butler, Samuel. Campbell, Rufus. Choate, James R. Dudley, Stephen. Earle, Joseph. Fogg, Francis A. Follett, John E. Folsom, Cyrus H. Haines, George W. Hall, Samuel P. Hammond, George W, Jacobs, John. Knowles, Augustus. Knowles, John. Lawton, Daniel. Leeman, Moses D. Lyon, William. Melvin, Adorno L. Moody, Edlon D. Moshier, Stephen. Page, Charles R. Page, David L. Patch, Jonathan. Perkins, William. Pinkham, William, Quint, Ivory. Ramsdell, Harvey. Russell, Samuel B. Stanley, George W. Webster, Nathan. Whittier, Jonathan, Wiggin, James M. Yeaton, Phineas,...

Read More

Lovering Family Genealogy of Taunton Massachusetts

Through much of the nineteenth century there figured prominently in the business and social life of Taunton — continuing to do so at the present — the family bearing the name introducing this sketch. Reference is made to the late Hon. Willard Lovering, long one of the leading manufacturers not only of Taunton, but of the great manufacturing region thereabout, in both Massachusetts and Rhode Island, a representative in the Massachusetts Assembly, bank president, etc.; and to his sons and grandsons, the former being the late Charles L., the late Hon. William C. and Hon. Henry Morton Lovering, all...

Read More

Anthony Family of Bristol County Massachusetts

The Anthony family of Bristol County Massachusetts descend from one John Anthony of Hampstead England who travelled in the Hercules to New England and settled in Rhode Island in 1634. This family, under the entrepreneurship of Edmund Anthony, became prominent publishers of many early Massachusetts papers, some of which were prominent in the establishment of the Republican Party and it’s causes.

Read More

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

Read More

Slave Narrative of Fanny Smith Hodges

Interviewer: Mrs. W. F. Holmes Person Interviewed: Fanny Smith Hodges Location: Berglundtown, Mississippi Fanny Smith Hodges lives in Berglundtown, in the northern part of town, in the only Negro settlement within the corporate limits of McComb. “My name’s Fanny Hodges. I was Fanny Smith befo’ I was mar’ied. My mammy was Jane Weathersby, an’ she b’long ter old man Weathersby in Amite County. He was de meanes’ man what ever lived. My pappy was sol’ befo’ I was born. I doan know nothin’ ’bout him. I had one sister—her name was Clara—and one brudder—his name was Jack. Dey said my pappy’s name was George. I doan know. “Mammy said when I was jes big ‘nough to nuss an’ wash leetle chulluns, I was sol’ to Marse Hiram Cassedy an’ dat man give me ter his darter, Miss Mary, to be her maid. De Cassedys sho’ was good people. I was big ‘nough to draw water, an’ put it in a tub an’ wash Miss Mary, Miss Annie, an’ Miss July. I had to keep ’em clean. I had to comb dey hair an’ dey would holler an’ say I pulled. I was tol’ not to let anything hurt dem chulluns. “I slep’ in de Quarters wid de other niggers. Befo’ sunup I had to git to de Big House ter dress dem chulluns. I doan’ member whut kind of...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Eustace Hodges

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Eustace Hodges Location: 625 W. Lenoir Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Age: 76 I doan know when I wus borned, ner where but at fust my mammy an’ me ‘longed ter a McGee here in Wake County. My mammy wurked in de fiel’s den, ditchin’ an’ such, even plowin’ while we ‘longed ter McGee, but he sold us ter Mr. Rufus Jones. My daddy still ‘longed ter him but at de close of de war he comed ter Mr. Jones’ plantation an’ he tuck de name of Jones ‘long wid us. Marse Rufus wus gooder dan Marse McGee, dey said. He give us more ter eat an’ wear an’ he ain’t make us wurk so hard nother. We had our wurk ter do, of course, but mammy ain’t had ter ditch ner plow no mo’. She wurked in de house den, an’ none of de wimmen done men’s wurk. Course she can’t wurk so hard an’ have ‘leben chilluns too. She had a baby one day an’ went ter wurk de nex’ while she ‘longed ter McGee, but at Marse Rufus’ she stayed in de bed seberal days an’ had a doctor. Marse Rufus uster let us take Sadday evenin’ off an’ go swimmin’ er fishin’ er go ter Raleigh. I ‘members dat somebody in town had a fuss wid Marse Rufus ’bout lettin’...

Read More

Biography of Albert Hodges

ALBERT HODGES. Albert Hodges is an attorney at law of wide reputation, a man of unquestioned integrity, a close reasoner and a profound thinker. He is a Missourian by birth, and has inculcated in him the sterling principles of the better class of citizens of the State. He was born in Taney County (afterward Douglas County), November 2, 1848, and is a son of Edmond and Sarah (Garrison) Hodges, the former a native of Kentucky, and the latter of Warren County, Indiana, born in 1827. The grandfather, John Hodges, was a native of Kentucky, and the family moved from that State to Indiana at an early date, and thence to Missouri in 1835- After reaching the latter State, the grandfather settled at the mouth of Beaver Spring Creek, in Taney County, afterward Douglas and Taney Counties, and followed farming the rest of his life. He was one of the earliest pioneers of that section. His son, the father of our subject, followed in his footsteps and became an agriculturist. He is still living on the tract of land where he settled many years ago, in Douglas County. In 1846 he married Miss Sarah Garrison and immediately afterward began his career as an agriculturist. He has met with unusual success and has a fine farm of 360 acres, the same being an ornament to the county. During the Civil War...

Read More

Biography of W. P. Hodges

W. P. HODGES. Probably there is not a man better known in Searcy and adjoining counties than W. P. Hodges, the efficient sheriff and collector of this county. He is an intelligent man of affairs, keeps abreast of the times and has the reputation of being one of the most enterprising and progressive men, as well as one of the most trustworthy and capable county officials, being especially fitted for the offices of sheriff and collector. He was born in the county in which he now resides July 31, 1857, and therefore it is not to be wondered at that he has ever had the interests of the county at heart and is a public-spirited and loyal citizen. His father, Jesse M. Hodges, was born in Mississippi and at an early day became a resident of Searcy County, Arkansas, where he is living at the present time. His wife, Nancy D. Hodges, was born in Tennessee and is still living. W. P. Hodges grew up in Searcy County on a farm and obtained his literary education in the schools of Marshall. He remained with and assisted his parents until he attained the age of twenty-four years, when he started out to fight life’s battles for himself. He opened a mercantile establishment at Snow Ball, this county, and carried on this business there with success until 1892, when he was...

Read More

Biography of George H. Hodges, Hon.

Hon. George H. Hodges, the nineteenth governor of Kansas, was chief executive of the state from January, 1913, to January, 1915. Of his capable administration as governor, marked by progressive leadership throughout, a complete review is given elsewhere in this publication in the chapter devoted to the work of the governors. The following paragraphs serve to supplement that review with some of the more personal details and his place as a Kansas citizen and business man. A resident of Kansas nearly fifty years, George Hartshorn Hodges was born at Orion, in Richland County, Wisconsin, February 6, 1866, a son of William W. and Lydia Ann (Hartshorn) Hodges. When he was three years of age, in 1869, his parents brought him to Kansas and they located at Olathe, in Johnson County, where he had lived almost his entire life. His father was a school teacher, a man of fine intellectual and moral character, and while at his death a few years later he left his family little material property, he left an honored name and a character which his own children strove to emulate. W. W. Hodges evinced a great fondness for young people and had the ability to win their regard and thus did much to influence the formative character of many youth. Governor Hodges was educated in the public schools of Olathe and in 1886, at the age...

Read More

Thad H. Hodges

Corpl., Air Service, 5th and 2nd A. S. M.; of Beaufort County; son of S. C. and Virginia Hodges. Entered service Dec. 13, 1917, at Washington, N.C. Sent to Ft. Thomas, Ky. Transferred to Camp Hancock, Ga., from there to Camp Merritt, N. J. Sailed for Brest, France, March 26, 1918. Promoted to Corpl., June, 1918. Arrived in USA July 3, 1919, New York. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., July 17,...

Read More


Free Genealogy Archives

It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest