Surname: Hitchcock

Index to Articles found in the El Farol Newspaper 1905-1906

The Lincoln County New Mexico online archives contains pdf’s of all remaining copies of the El Farol Newspaper of Capitan NM, but doesn’t have an index to the newspaper. C. W. Barnum, an active member of AHGP, and state coordinator for the New Mexico AHGP recently invested his time and energy into providing an every person index to the various extant issues. He has shared this wonderful index with AccessGenealogy in hopes that it will reach a wider audience. Enjoy!

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Descendants of Francis Brayton of Fall River, MA

BRAYTON. The first in America by this name, one Francis Brayton, came from England to Portsmouth, Rhode Island, where, in 1643, he was received as an inhabitant, in 1655, became a freeman, and to him nearly if not all the Braytons of New England trace their origin. He early entered into the political life of the country, serving as a member of the General Court of Commissioners for the Colony, for many years as member of the Rhode Island General Assembly, and frequently during the later generations his descendants have held positions of responsibility and trust in the public...

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Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

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1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George...

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Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

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Biographical Sketch of Amos Hitchcock

Amos Hitchcock married Philenia Felt, who, born May 3, 1790, died December 20, 1872. She was a daughter of Eliphalet Felt, who was a Revolutionary soldier, and Lona (Witherel) Felt. Her brothers and sisters were: Charles, John, James, Eunice, Warren, Obadiah, Eleutheria, and Wells. She was the mother of Henry A. Hitchcock, born in Claremont, September 11, 1815, who was a prominent citizen of Walpole, Selectman of Walpole, represented the town in the legislature for some time, and was State Senator for the Tenth District in 1872 and 1873; of Helen P., born January 16, 1817, who married George Wallingford; of Mortimer, who died at the age of five; of Alexander Vietts, born November 4, 1821, who for several years was the Registrar of Deeds for Sullivan County, and for one year the Representative of Newport in the legislature; and of Lona Rebecca, who was the youngest. The last four children were born in Rockingham,...

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Biographical Sketch of Isaac B. Hitchcock

The subject of this sketch was born February, 1825, in Pope County, Arkansas, son of Jacob Hitchcock, of Massachusetts, and Nancy Brown, of East Hartford, Conn. Jacob Hitchcock, father to the subject of our sketch, settled among the Cherokees in 1820, and died in Lee County, Iowa, in July, 1865. Isaac, being a delicate boy, spent his youth at home, deriving most of his knowledge from reading and parental instruction. In 1847 he commenced teaching, and taught at Fort Smith for a short time, after which he attended Sequoyah national school for three sessions. Before the war Mr. Hitchcock taught in the Cherokee and Creek Nations, being associated with the Tallahassee Presbyterian Mission in 1854 and 1855. During the war he went north with his family, and afterward re-commenced teaching at Fort Gibson, and from thence taught at various points in the Cherokee Nation. Mr. Hitchcock during his lifetime has disseminated knowledge in the States of Kansas, Arkansas, Iowa, and Missouri. In 1857 he married Miss Eliza Ann Duncan, daughter of Rev. John Duncan, a leading Cherokee councilor. She was a graduate of the Cherokee High School, and a lady of accomplishments. By this marriage Mr. Hitchcock has two sons, T. B. Hitchcock and Iraeneus Hitchcock and a daughter named Etta, married to Mr. Samuel Burns. Mr. Hitchcock was teaching at the national male seminary when it closed last...

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Patience Todd Bradley of Hamden CT

BRADLEY, Patience Todd5, (Abner4, Ithamar3, Michael2, Chrispher1) born Dec. 6, 1762, died Nov. 1, 1801, married Deacon Aaron Bradley, of Hamden, Conn. Children: I. David, d. 1854, m. Abigail(???). He was a clergyman in Hamden, Conn., for 46 years. II. Chloe, b. 1792, m. Levi, son of Levi and Chloe (Bradley) Dickerman, of Hamden, Conn. III. Mary, m. Silas Hitchcock, of Cheshire, Conn. IV. Martha, b. July 3, 1793, died May 9, 1866, m. Oct. 11, 1810, John, son of Nathaniel and Mary (Thompson) Fitch, (a brother of Prof. Eleazer Thompson Fitch), who was b. Oct. 9, 1780, d. Jan. 28,...

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