Surname: Henry

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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History of Prairie du Rocher

On a certain day in January, 1799, (the exact date cannot now be ascertained) the little village of Prairie du Rocher was all aglow with excitement. A party of soldiers had arrived. It was a detachment under the command of Col. George Rogers Clark, and they decided to spend the evening at the hospitable home of Captain Jean Baptiste Barbeau, (Barber). Col. Clark tells of this hospitable reception and the “ball” that followed: “We went cheerfully to Prara De Ruch,’ 12 miles from Kaskaskia, war I intended to spend the Eavening at Capt Barbers.” “The Gentlemen & Ladies immediately...

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Indian Captivity Narratives

This collection contains entire narratives of Indian captivity; that is to say, we have provided the reader the originals without the slightest abridgement. Some of these captivities provide little in way of customs and manners, except to display examples of the clandestine warfare Native Americans used to accomplish their means. In almost every case, there was a tug of war going on between principle government powers, French, American, British, and Spanish, and these powers used the natural prowess of the Indians to assist them in causing warfare upon American and Canadian settlers. There were definitely thousands of captivities, likely tens of thousands, as the active period of these Indian captivity narratives covers 150 years. Unfortunately, few have ever been put under a pen by the original captive, and as such, we have little first-hand details on their captivity. These you will find here, are only those with which were written by the captive or narrated to another who could write for them; you shall find in a later collection, a database of known captives, by name, location, and dates, and a narrative about their captivity along with factual sources. But that is for another time.

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Narrative of the captivity of Alexander Henry, Esq – Indian Captivities

Narrative of the captivity of Alexander Henry, Esq., who, in the time of Pontiac’s War, fell into the hands of the Huron Indians. Detailing a faithful account of the capture of the Garrison of Michilimacki-Nac, and the massacre of about ninety people. Written by himself. 1Mr. Henry was an Indian trader in America for about sixteen years. He came to Canada with the army of General Amherst, and previous to his being made prisoner by the Indians experienced a variety of fortune. His narrative, as will be seen, is written with great candor as well as ability, and to the discriminating reader needs no encomium. He was living in Montreal in 1809, as appears from the date of his preface to his Travels, which he published in New York that year, with a dedication to Sir Joseph Banks. Ed. When I reached Michilimackinac I found several other traders, who had arrived before me, from different parts of the country, and who, in general, declared the dispositions of the Indians to be hostile to the English, and even apprehended some attack. M. Laurent Ducharme distinctly informed Major Etherington that a plan was absolutely conceived for destroying him, his garrison and all the English in the upper country; but the commandant believing this and other reports to be without foundation, proceeding only from idle or ill-disposed persons, and of a tendency...

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Narrative of Robert Eastburn – Indian Captivities

A Faithful Narrative of the Many Dangers and Sufferings, as well as wonderful and surprising deliverances, of Robert Eastburn, during his late captivity among the Indians. Written by Himself. Published at the earnest request of many persons, for the benefit of the Public. With a recommendatory Preface by the Rev. Gilbert Tennent. Psalms 24, 6, 7, and 193, 2, 4. Philadelphia: Printed. Boston: Reprinted and sold by Green & Russell, opposite the Probate Office in Queen street, 1753. Preface Candid Reader: The author (and subject) of the ensuing narrative (who is a deacon of our church, and has been so for many years) is of such an established good character, that he needs no recommendation of others where he is known; a proof of which was the general joy of the inhabitants of this city, occasioned by his return from a miserable captivity; together with the readiness of divers persons to contribute to the relief of himself and necessitous family, without any request of his, or the least motion of that tendency. But seeing the following sheets are like to spread into many places where he is not known, permit me to say that, upon long acquaintance, I have found him to be a person of candor, integrity, and sincere piety, whose testimony may with safety be depended upon; which give his narrative the greater weight, and may induce...

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English Settlement on the Holsten River

In the meantime, the wild region upon the Cumberland river was explored, and some temporary establishments formed at the bluff, on which is now situated the city of Nashville. Captain James Robertson was the hero of these bold adventures, and had several times, with a small party of men, cut his way from extreme East Tennessee to that country, passing over the lofty Cumberland mountains and through dangerous Indian settlements. Returning to the Holston, after having made several of these trips, he raised a large company of emigrants, and built boats at Long Island. When they were nearly ready to be launched, he placed himself at the head of a horse party, and set out over the mountains for the Cumberland, intending to leave signs upon the trees at the head of the Muscle Shoals, after going from Nashville to that place. These signs he intended for the purpose of letting the voyagers know whether it would be practicable for them to disembark at the Muscle Shoals and go to the Cumberland by land. A large number of flat boats, filled with emigrants and their effects, began the voyage from Long Island, upon the Holston. Those recollected will be mentioned, for the gratification of descendants. The large Donaldson family, who, after reaching the Cumberland, settled upon Stone’s river, and became connected by affinity with General Andrew Jackson, all embarked...

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1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. W. G. Henry

(See Downing, Daniel and Foreman)-Nannie Catherine Daniel, born January 12, 1835, married December 23, 1857 Anderson Springston Wilson born in 1830. They were the parents of DeWitt, born January 7, 1859, James Daniel, born February 2, 1861; and May Wilson, born May 1, 1862. Anderson Springston Wilson died December 26, 1865 and his widow married December 14, 1872 Henry Clay Barnes, August 29, 1845 at Dwight Mission, Cherokee Nation and they were the parents of Myrtle Barnes, born in Flint District July 25, 1874, educated at Tahlequah and Female Seminary. Married May 14, 1891 Wallace Gibbs Henry, born April 6, 1872. W. G. and Myrtle Henry were the parents of DeWitt Clinton, born April 4, 1892; Roy Wilson, born July 22, 1897 and Myra May Henry, born December 8, 1903. Nancy Catherine Barnes died December 10,...

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Biographical Sketch of Jesse Henry

(See Grant)-Ghigovi married Love and Muskrat. All were full blood Cherokees. Her children by the first marriage were: Celia, married Messenger Tiger; Lucy, married Jesse, son of William Henry; Tahnee, married Thomas Henry Alexander: Nannie, married Rock Crutchfield and Annie Love married Whirlwind. Her three daughters, Olkiney, Ailsey and Alee Muskrat, died without descent. Jesse and Lucy (Love) Henry were the parents of Josiah Henry born January 1, 1850 married December 26, 1871, Laura daughter of Ellis and Martha (Cope) Buffington, born September 22, 1852. They were the parents of Jesse Henry, born September 16, 1875, educated in the Cherokee National Schools. Married Margaret Jeanette Allen nee Toole and they had two sons: Josiah, born Jan. 3, 1898 and William E. Henry, Feb. 3, 1901. Mr. Henry’s second wife Vernie Ream Crittenden is now deceased and had no children. Mr. Henry is a farmer...

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Biographical Sketch of Laura Alice Henry

(See Grant)-Laura daughter of Ellis and Martha (Copeland) Buffington was born September 22. Married December 26, 1871, Josiah, son of Jesse and Lucy (Love) Henry, born January 1, 1850. He was elected in November 1869, Solicitor of Cooweescoowee District appointed to the same office in by the Chief. Elected Councilor from Cooweescoowee District August 1, 1881 and August 2, 1897. He died Oct. 4, 1904 and she died Nov. 12, 1906. They were the parents of Rosa Jane Henry, born August 10, 1883, educated in the Cherokee Public Schools and Female Seminary and E. E. Rector, born Feb. 27, 1873 Butler County, Kansas. They are the parents of Edna May, born Dec. 19, 1899; James Emmett, born Oct. 29, 1906; Josiah, born June 28, 1908 and Frances Rector born July 5, 1910. They are farmers near Claremore. They belong to the Methodist Church and he is a Mason. Mrs. Rector’s Cherokee name is Ay-ni. Josiah Henry son of Jess Henry was married 19, 1918 to Marie Potts and there was to them two children, Frances N. Henry born March 11, 1919 and Beman L. Henry born Oct. 22,...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. W. G. Henry

(See Downing, Daniel and Foreman)—Nannie Catherine Daniel, born January 12, 1835, married December 23, 1857 Anderson Springton Wilson, born in 1830. They were the parents of DeWitt, born January 7, 1860; James Daniel born February 2, 1861 and May Wilson, born May 1, 1862. Anderson Springston Wilson died December 26, 1865 and his widow married Henry Clay Barnes in 1872; Henry Clay Barnes was born at Dwight Mission, Cherokee Nation, August 29, 1845. They were the parents of Myrtle, born July 25, 1874, educated at Tahlequah Female Seminary, married May 14, 1891 Wallace Gibbs Henry, born April 6, 1872. W. G. and Myrtle Henry are the parents of DeWitt Clinton, born April 11, 1892; Roy Wilson, born July 22, 1897 and Myra May born Dec. 8, 1903. Nancy Catherine Barnes died Dec. 10,...

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Treaty of August 24, 1835

Treaty with the Comanche and Witchetaw Indians and their associated Bands. For the purpose of establishing and perpetuating peace and friendship between the United States of America and the Comanche and Witchetaw nations, and their associated bands or tribes of Indians, and between these nations or tribes, and the Cherokee, Muscogee, Choctaw, Osage, Seneca and Quapaw nations or tribes of Indians, the President of the United States has, to accomplish this desirable object, and to aid therein, appointed Governor M. Stokes, M. Arbuckle Brigdi.-Genl. United States army, and F. W. Armstrong, Actg. Supdt. Western Territory, commissioners on the part of the United States; and the said Governor M. Stokes and M. Arbuckle, Brigdi. Genl. United States army, with the chiefs and representatives of the Cherokee, Muscogee, Choctaw, Osage, Seneca, and Quapaw nations or tribes of Indians, have met the chiefs, warriors, and representatives of the tribes first above named at Camp Holmes, on the eastern border of the Grand Prairie, near the Canadian river, in the Muscogee nation, and after full deliberation, the said nations or tribes have agreed with the United States, and with one another upon the following articles: Article 1. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America, and all the individuals composing the Comanche and Witchetaw nations and their associated bands or tribes of Indians, and...

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Slave Narrative of Nettie Henry

Person Interviewed: Nettie Henry Location: Meridian, Mississippi Place of Birth: Livingston, Alabama Age: 82 Place of Residence: 19th Street, Meridian, Lauderdale County, Mississippi Nettie Henry, ex-slave, 19th Street, Meridian, Lauderdale County, is 82 years old. She is five feet tall and weighs one hundred pounds. “De Chil’s place was at Livingston, Alabama, on Alamucha Creek. Dat’s where I was born, but I jus’ did git borned good when Miss Lizzie—she was Marse Chil’s girl—married Marse John C. Higgins an’ moved to Mer-ree-dian. Me an’ my mammy an’ my two sisters, Liza an’ Tempe, was give to Miss Lizzie. “I aint no country Nigger; I was raised in town. My mammy cooked an’ washed an’ ironed an’ done ever’thing for Miss Lizzie. She live right where Miss Annie—she was Miss Lizzie’s daughter—live now. But den de house face Eighth Street ‘stead o’ Seventh Street, lak it do now. Day warnt any other houses in dat block. ‘Fore de Surrender, dey turnt de house to face Seventh Street ’cause de town was growin’ an’ a heap o’ folks was buildin’ houses. I tell you somp’in’ ’bout Seventh Street in a minute. Couldn’ nobody dat lived in Mer-ree-dian right after de Surrender ever forgit Seventh Street an’ where it head to. “My pappy didn’ go wid us to Mer-ree-dian. He b’longed to one set o’ white people, you see, an’ my mammy...

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