Surname: Henley

Index to Articles found in the El Farol Newspaper 1905-1906

The Lincoln County New Mexico online archives contains pdf’s of all remaining copies of the El Farol Newspaper of Capitan NM, but doesn’t have an index to the newspaper. C. W. Barnum, an active member of AHGP, and state coordinator for the New Mexico AHGP recently invested his time and energy into providing an every person index to the various extant issues. He has shared this wonderful index with AccessGenealogy in hopes that it will reach a wider audience. Enjoy!

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Biographical Sketch of Hazekiah Henley

Hezekiah Henley, of Virginia, had a son named Thomas O., who was married first to Martha Bugg, by whom he had William, Samuel, Thompson, John, Nancy, Martha, and Polly. After the death of his first wife he married Mary Herndon, by whom he had Allen, Wilson, Thomas, Archibald, Schuyler, Sarah, Lucinda, Amanda, and Catharine. Samuel was married twice, and settled in St. Charles County. Allen settled in Montgomery County in 1838. He married Lucy Thomas, and they had ten...

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Slave Narrative of Harriet Cheatam

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Harriet Cheatam Location: Indiana Place of Birth: Gallatin, Tennessee Date of Birth: December 25, 1843 Age: 94 Place of Residence: 816 Darnell Street Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #8 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE MRS. HARRIET CHEATAM-EX-SLAVE 816 Darnell Street Interviewer’s Comment Incidents in the life of Mrs. Cheatam as she told them to me. Interview “I was born, in 1843, in Gallatin, Tennessee, 94 years ago this coming (1937) Christmas day.” “Our master, Martin Henley, a farmer, was hard on us slaves, but we were happy in spite of our lack.” “When I was a child, I didn’t have it as hard as some of the children in the quarters. I always stayed in the “big house,” slept on the floor, right near the fireplace, with one quilt for my bed and one quilt to cover me. Then when I growed up, I was in the quarters.” “After the Civil war, I went to Ohio to cook for General Payne. We had a nice life in the general’s house.” “I remember one night, way back before the Civil war, we wanted a goose. I went out to steal one as that was the only way we slaves would have one. I crept very quiet-like, put my hand in where they was and grabbed, and what do you suppose...

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Biography of Joseph M. Henley

JOSEPH M. HENLEY is one of the most prominent, enterprising and progressive tillers of the soil in Buckhorn Township, and his residence on Gobler Flat. He was born in Franklin County, Ga., in 1847, but his father, John S. Henley, was born in Washington County, Tennessee He was a minister of the Methodist Church and preached the gospel in his native State, Virginia, West Virginia, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina until his death in 1865, at about the age of seventy years. He supported the principles of the Democrat party throughout life, and at two different times represented Rabun County, Ga., in the State Legislature During the Civil War he was a Union man. He was well educated, mainly by his own efforts, and by trade was a cabinet maker. He sold goods in North Carolina and Georgia, and was shrewd and successful in the conduct of his affairs, but was always generous in the use of his means, and being sympathetic, kind-hearted and charitable, no one ever left his house hungry nor in sore want. He was married three times: first to Mary Syller, then to Mary E. Patton, and afterward to Minerva Mclntire, the last mentioned being the mother of the subject of this sketch. Mr. Henly now says he received his education in the Confederate Army, for he entered the service when he was but...

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Biography of Albert Henley

Albert Henley has been a resident of Lawrence for thirty-nine years. In all that time he had been actively and conspicuously identified with the material growth and commercial development of the state. Mr. Henley was a pioneer manufacturer of barbed wire in Kansas. Barbed wire is now accepted as a commonplace product of American industry. Only the old timers recall with what prejudice this wire was introduced into general use and also the crude forms in which it was at first manufactured. Mr. Henley’s early attempts at the manufacture were on a very small scale. He began at Lawrence under the name The Consolidated Barbed Wire Company. From a small beginning this grew to a large institution, supplying its product over practically all the prairie counties of Kansas. His first equipment consisted of four machines, which were brought to Lawrence in a small tin trunk. At first the barbs were made by hand in the old Kimball factory, and from there were carried in a tin bucket to the wire factory at the foot of Massachusetts Street. The bars were put on by hand. Gradually improvements and extensions were made and automatic machinery was introduced, most of it invented by Mr. Henley himself. In the end the factory employed between 100 and 150 hands, and the business was one of the chief industrial assets of Lawrence. There was also...

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Rough Riders

Compiled military service records for 1,235 Rough Riders, including Teddy Roosevelt have been digitized. The records include individual jackets which give the name, organization, and rank of each soldier. They contain cards on which information from original records relating to the military service of the individual has been copied. Included in the main jacket are carded medical records, other documents which give personal information, and the description of the record from which the information was obtained.

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