Surname: Hall

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

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Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

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Dodge Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

Phineas Dodge, head of this family, died at about 80 years of age. He was the son of Elisha and Lydia (Day) Dodge, born Sept. 6, 1813. In his youth he was a sailor, afterwards became a ship carpenter and ended his days as a farmer. The children of Phineas and Harriet Newell (Candage) Dodge were: Justin, Rosina, Adelbert, Clara, mina, Frank, Annah and George.

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Bartlett Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

John Bartlett was born at Mt. Desert in the early years of 1800, married Mary Hale, of Sedgwick, July 27, 1826, and set up housekeeping upon Long Island. Their children were: Caroline, George, mary, Frederick, Vienna, John, Nancy, Hiram and James.

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Campbell Genealogy of Narraguagus Valley Maine

Some time between 1766 and 1768, Alexander Campbell removed from Damariscotta to Steuben, and built a mill at Tunk, now called Smithville, on the east side of the river. It was the first mill there. In 1759, he married Betsey Nickels, who was born in Ireland and came to Lynn, Mass., with her parents when about six years old. From Lynn, she came with her brother, Capt. William. Nickels, to Damariscotta. Children of Alexander and Betsey Campbell were: James, Frances, Hannah, Peggy, Polly, William, Samuel, Alexander, and Betsey.

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Muster Roll of Captain Albion P. Arnold’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain Albion P. Arnold’s Company of Artillery in the Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service “by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the twenty-fifth day of February, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Augusta, Maine, to the seventeenth day of April, 1839, when discharged or mustered.

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Business Men of Northern Maine

The Northern Maine, its Points of Interest and its Representative Business Men manuscript provides historical sketches of the nine towns featured within it’s embrace, as well as biographical sketches of the businesses and the men and women who owned and ran those businesses found within the towns of Houlton, Presque Isle, Caribou, Ft. Fairfield, Danforth, Lincoln, Mattawamkeag, Winn, and Kingman.

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Genealogies of the First Settlers of Passaic Valley

Passaic Valley in New Jersey was first settled in the early 1700’s, primarily by families from Long Island, New York and Connecticut. The Family records, or, Genealogies of the first settlers of Passaic Valley and vicinity above Chatham provides genealogies of these early settlers from family records when they could be obtained, otherwise the author used family members to provide the information. Since some of the information comes from memory of individuals, one should validate what is written before relying on it to greatly.

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