Surname: Gudger

Letter from J.C.L. Gudger to Franklin Love – Descendants

Treasury Dept. Mr. F.D. LOVE, Washington, D.C. March 19th, 1903. Georgetown, Tex. My Dear Sir: Your letter in regard to Col. Robert Love reached me in due time but I have had no convenient opportunity to answer your inquiries till now. Col. Robert Love was a Lieutenant in the Revolutionary Army and joined Gen. Greene in N.C. during his (Greene’s) celebrated retreat from S.C. to near Danville, Va., and the subsequent battle of Guilford Court House March 15th, (I think) 1781. Col. Love was my great-grandfather. He was not at the battle of Guilford Court House, having been sent off to S.W. Va., to the lead mines, there to procure lead for Green’s Army. He was in the battle at Whitwell’s Mills, a short while before Guilford Court House. There is an application on file for a pension by my great Grandfather, Robert Love, in the pension Office here, and if you will write the Commissioner of Pensions, Washington, D.C., he will, I have no doubt, send you a copy. It is very inconvenient for me to personally procure it for you, as the opening and closing of the Treasury, where I am employed, and Pension Office are the same. Robert Love was a son of Samuel Love and Dorcas Bell (of the family of John Bell, of Tenn., a candidate for President in 1860); date of marriage, I...

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Slave Narrative of Sarah Gudger

Interviewer: Marjorie Jones Person Interviewed: Sarah Gudger Date of Interview: May 5, 1937 Location: Asheville, North Carolina Date of Birth: Sept. 15. 1816 Age: 121 Investigation of the almost incredible claim of Aunt Sarah Gudger, ex-slave living in Asheville, that she was born on Sept. 15, 1816, discloses some factual information corroborating her statements. Aunt Sarah’s father, Smart Gudger, belonged to and took his family name from Joe Gudger, who lived near Oteen, about six miles east of Asheville in the Swannanoa valley, prior to the War Between the States. Family records show that Joe Gudger married a Miss McRae in 1817, and that while in a despondent mood he ended his own life by hanging, as vividly recounted by the former slave. John Hemphill, member of the family served by Aunt Sarah until “freedom,” is recalled as being “a few y’ars younge’ as me,” and indeed his birth is recorded for 1822. Alexander Hemphill, mentioned by Aunt Sarah as having left to join the Confederate army when about 25 years of age, is authentic and his approximate age in 1861 tallies with that recalled by the ex-slave. When Alexander went off to the war Aunt Sarah was “gettin’ t’ be an ol’ woman.” Aunt Sarah lives with distant cousins in a two-story frame house, comfortably furnished, at 8 Dalton street in South Asheville (the Negro section lying north...

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