Surname: Gray

Genealogy of George Spracklin

George Spracklin, son of Peter Spracklin and Elizabeth Andrews,¬†continued living in Dudley Township, Hardin Co., Ohio. There he met Arloa Turner Minor and was married 9 April 1840, Knox Co., Ohio. In December of 1864 George bought land here in Shelby Co., Illinois in Drypoint Township. He paid $3680 for 200 acres south of Lakewood, Ill; in 1865, he and his family lived in Edwards County, Ill. before moving to Shelby County. By 1868 George owned 300 acres in Shelby County. Arloa, George’s wife, died in July, 1892 and is buried in Red Bank Cemetery, land formerly owned by George Spracklin. By the time George died in 1902, he had parceled out much of the land to his and Arloa’s children. He left an estate of 70 acres of land in Edwards County, Ill.; 70 acres of land in Shelby County, Ill., valued at $3750.00; one house and 6 lots in Lakewood Ill. and $3000 worth of personal property. His cash on hand at death was $617.50 with $1572.18 owed him in loans. On that record Peter J. Spracklin, a resident of Hardin Co., Ohio, 30 Dec. 1902, stated that he had cared for George Spracklin from January 1 to July 1, 1893. Some of his personal or household items were sold on Sept. 25, 1902. These items were: 1 table, 1 bed stead, 1 safe, 1 bureau, 1...

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Biographical Sketch of George Gray

George Gray, of Scotland, emigrated to America previous to the revolution, and when that war began he joined the American army and served during the entire struggle. He had several brothers in the British army during the same war. Before leaving Scotland, he married Mary Stuart, and they settled first in Philadelphia, but afterward removed to North Carolina, and from there to Bryan’s Station in Kentucky. Here their son Joseph married Nary Finley, and settled in Warren County, Kentucky. In 1818 he removed to Missouri, and settled on Brush creek in Montgomery County, where he died in 1830. His children were Hannah, William, Isaac, George, Sarah, Rachel, James, and Mary. Hannah married Asa Williams, who was an early settler of Montgomery County. William, Isaac and George married sisters, named Price, of Kentucky. William had three children, who settled in Missouri after the death of their parents. Isaac and George also settled in Montgomery County, but the latter removed to Clark County in 1837, where he still resides. Sarah married Stephen Finley, who settled in Wisconsin in 1846. Rachel married John P. Glover, who settled in Oregon. James married Margaret Williams, of Ohio. Mary married Presley Anderson, who died in 1848, and who was Sheriff of Montgomery County at the time. He left a widow and five children, who still live in Montgomery...

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Slave Narrative of Precilla Gray

Person Interviewed: Precilla Gray Location: Nashville, Tennessee Place of Birth: Williamson County TN Age: 107 Place of Residence: 807 Ewing Ave., Nashville, Tenn. I think I’se 107 Y’ars ole. Wuz bawn in Williamson County ‘fore de Civil wah. Guess de reason I hab libed so long wuz cose I tuk good keer ob mahself en wore warm clo’es en still do, w’ar mah yarn pettycoats now. Hab had good health all mah life. Hab tuk very lettle medicine en de wust sickness I eber had wuz small-pox. I’se bin a widah ’bout 70 y’ars. Mah mammy d’ed w’en I wuz young but mah daddy libed ter be 103 y’ars ole. I nebber went ter schul a day in mah life, ma’ied ‘fore freedum en w’en I got free, had ter wuk all de time ter mek a libin’ fer mah two chillen. One libes in California en I lives wid de uther, tergedder wid mah great, great, grandson, five y’ars ole, in Nashville. Mah fust marster en missis wuz Amos en Sophia Holland en he made a will dat we slaves wuz all ter be kep’ among de fam’ly en I wuz heired fum one fam’ly ter ‘nother. Wuz owned under de “will” by Haddas Holland, Missis Mary Haddock en den Missis Synthia Ma’ied Sam Pointer en I libed wid her ’til freedum wuz ‘clared. Mah fust mistress had...

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Biographical Sketch of Deacon Lamond Gray

Deacon Lamond Gray was a descendant of Scotch ancestors who, in 1612, settled in the north of Ireland, near Londonderry. In 1718 the family of which John Gray was the head, with some forty other families, emigrated through Boston to Worcester, Mass. In 1743 the family settled in Pelham, Mass., where Lamond was born in 1753, the son of Daniel Gray. He was well educated, and for a time taught school in that vicinity. May 26, 1778, he was married to Isabel Hamilton, widow of Lieutenant Robert Hamilton, by whom he had two children, Robert and Isabel, the latter afterwards becoming the wife of Captain Jeremiah Lee, of Bridport. After his marriage Mr. Gray remained in Pelham about ten years, when he came to Bridport and purchased two tracts of land of one hundred acres each. One of the tracts so purchased included the land now owned by P. Elitharp, about a mile south of the village, and ran eastward to the wooded hill. The other hundred acres included the farm where Edward Shacket now lives. Thus Lamond Gray became one of the early settlers of Bridport, where he continued to dwell till his death in 1812, aged fifty-nine years. Being a scholarly man and a good penman, he was elected town clerk in 1790, and held the position many years, and was also a deacon of the Congregational...

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Biography of Ozro Preston Gray

GRAY, OZRO P. Ozro Preston Gray was born in Bridport, Addison County, Vt., on September 18, 1806. Of the ancestors the following is known: His grandfather, Deacon Lamond Gray, was a descendant of Scotch ancestors who in 1612 settled in the North of Ireland, near Londonderry. In 1718 the family of which John Gray was the head, with some forty other families, emigrated through Boston to Worcester, Mass. In 1743 the family settled in Pelham, Mass., where Lamond Gray was born in 1753, the son of Daniel Gray. He was a well-educated man and taught school for a time in that vicinity. May 26, 1778, he was married to Mrs. Isabel Conkey Hamilton, widow of Lieutenant Robert Hamilton, by whom he had two children, Robert and Isabel; the latter afterward became the wife of Captain Jeremiah Lee, of Bridport, Vt., in 1795. After his marriage with Mrs. Hamilton Mr. Gray remained in Pelham about ten years, when, in company with his father, and brother Jeremiah, he came to Bridport and purchased two tracts of land of one hundred acres each. One of these tracts is about a mile south of the village, the other hundred acres included the farm where Prosper Lee lived and died. After the close of the Shay rebellion, Daniel and Jeremiah Gray returned to Pelham, leaving Lamond on their clearing. They subsequently transferred to him...

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Biography of Alfred Gray

Alfred Gray, a pioneer of Topeka and always active in promoting the agricultural and industrial interests of the state, was born at Evans, Erie County, New York, December 5, 1830. He was educated in his native state, and in the spring of 1857 located at Quindaro, Kansas. Mr. Gray was a member of the first State Legislature; was secretary of the Kansas State Board of Agriculture from 1872 to 1880, and was one of the commissioners to the Contennial Exposition at Philadelphia. His death occurred at Topeka on January 23, 1880, and his memorial monument stands in the cemetery at...

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Biography of Garrison G. Gray

To the prominent and esteemed citizen of Malheur County whose name appears above we grant a representation in the history of the County, since he is today one of the leading men domiciled here, has always labored for the up building of the County, is a man of integrity and uprightness, and receives the commendation of his fellows. Mr. Gray’s grandfather, John Gray, was said to be the last living soldier from the Revolution. He was a drummer boy at Bunker Hill and saw his father fall, then seized his sire’s musket and fought until the struggle closed. He worked for General Washington after the war. He died near Hiramsburg, Noble County, Ohio, in March, 1868, lacking only two months of being one hundred and five years of age. His stepdaughter, Mrs. Nancy Thomas, is now living at the age of ninety years on the farm adjoining that old homestead. Our subject was born, in Noble County, Ohio, February 23, 1830, being the son of Isaac and Elizabeth (Gorby) Gray. When five years of age he was taken with his parents to Athens County, and the following year, 1836, his mother died. In 1839 he went with his father to Jones County, Iowa, thence to Linn County and then to Cedar County, in which last place, at the age of eleven, he attended his first term of school. The...

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Biographical Sketch of Matt M. Gray

Matt. M. Gray, attorney at law, was born in Hancock county, Ill., in 1850; moved to Mo. and engaged in the practice of the law. In 1872 he came to Ida Grove; opened the first law office in the town, and in 1873 was elected county auditor, which office he held until 1876; then was obliged to resign on account of his large and increasing law business. He has been associated in business with Hon. R.T....

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Biographical Sketch of Nathaniel Gray

Nathaniel Gray was born March 17, 1736. He returned here in the winter of 1793, and located a mile and a half north of Sherburne, and resided there till his death, June 24, 1810. He had two children by his first wife, who died in Connecticut, where he married for his second wife Bethiah, widow of Benjamin Newcomb, who was born Feb. 26, 1735, and died on the same farm August 19, 1811, and who had five children by her former husband, all of whom came here. The children by his first wife were Elijah and Bethiah. Gray’s second wife’s children were Abraham Newcomb, James, Mercy and Hannah Raymond. The first school, which was organized for the winter, was kept at the log house of Nathaniel...

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Biographical Sketch of John Gray

John Gray’s land extended from the river east to the quarter line and included all that part of the village of Sherburne lying north of the State road now known as State street. His log house stood near the site of the Upham block, on the north-east corner of the business part of the village. He was born in Windham, Conn., in 1793, was a revolutionary soldier, and married Elizabeth Skeel, who was born in New Milford, Conn., in 1745, and died in Sherburne in 1824, aged 79. He had six children, all of whom were born in Connecticut: John, Jr., Nathaniel, Mabel, Betsey, Margaret and Reuben. John, Jr., married and settled on the river, his farm lying upon both sides of the river. His house stood on the bank ten or twelve rods from the west end of the bridge on the old State road. He was Justice here several years and Associate...

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Biography of R. N. Gray

R. N. GRAY. In tracing the genealogy of the Gray family in America, we find that the first member who made his home here was Robert Gray, the great-grandfather of our subject. He was a native of North Ireland, and was there reared and married, his wife being Miss Margaret Wilson, also a native of that country. Nearly a year after their marriage this young couple decided to cross the ocean and make their home in America. This was at a period ante-dating the Revolutionary War, for Mr. Gray was a soldier in that war and fought bravely for independence. They were unavoidably delayed on the voyage to this country by bad weather and their first child was born on the ocean. This child was named Jane. After reaching this country they remained in the East until after the war, and then, as Tennessee was open for settlers, they found their way there and were among the pioneers. The next child born to this worthy couple was Robert Gray, the grandfather of our subject; the others were named, in the order of their births, as follows: John, Daniel, Betsey, Nancy, Molly and Sarah. The three eldest daughters married three brothers by the name of Hawkins-John, Nicholas and Nathan, and the sister of these men was the mother of the noted Davy Crockett. The other two sisters, Molly and Sarah,...

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Biography of James H. Gray

JAMES H. GRAY. Lead Hill, Arkansas, is known as a flourishing town and contains many able and brainy business men, among whom the general merchant takes prominent rank. In this calling few members possess a wider reputation for ability and enterprise than James H. Gray. He was born in Stone County (then Independence County), Arkansas, in 1865. and is a son of John W. and Tennessee (Cornett) Gray, natives of Mississippi and Hamilton County, Tennessee, respectively, the father born in 1836 and the mother in 1844. When young Mr. and Mrs. Gray came with their parents to Arkansas, and here grew to mature years and married. For a number of years afterward they resided in Stone County, Arkansas, but in 1875 moved to Boone County and located in White River where they made their future home. Mr. Gray died on the 9th of April, 1878, in Taney County, Missouri, after returning from a business trip to Greene County, Missouri He was a successful farmer and stock man, and for two years served in the Confederate Army with Gen. Price. He was a Mason and a man well known and universally respected. He was one of five sons and four daughters born to William B. Gray who died in Boone County, Arkansas. about 1880, after a long and useful life. He came here in 1874 and was a prominent farmer...

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Slave Narrative of Edward Lycurgas

Interviewer: Pearl Randolph Person Interviewed: Edward Lycurgas Location: Jacksonville, Florida “Pap tell us ‘nother story ’bout do war and ’bout de fust time you saw mamma.” It has been almost 60 years since a group of children gathered about their father’s knee, clamoring for another story. They listened round-eyed to stories they already knew because “pap” had told them so many times before. These narratives along with the great changes he has seen, were carefully recorded in the mind of Edward, the only one of this group now alive. “Pap” was always ready to oblige with the story they never tired of. He could always be depended upon to begin at the beginning, for he loved to tell it. “It all begun with our ship being took off the coast of Newport News, Virginia. We wuz runnin’ the bl0ckade – sellin’ guns and what-not to them Northerners. We aint had nothin’ to do wid de war, unnerstand, we English folks was at’ter de money. Whose War? The North and South’s, of course. I hear my captain say many a time as how they was playin’ ball wid the poor niggers. One side says ‘You can’t keep your niggers lessen you pay em and treat em like other folks.’ Mind you dat wasn’t de rale reason, they was mad at de South but it was one of de ways dey...

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Biography of William L.Gray, M. D.

William L. Gray, M. D. The professional services of Dr. William L. Gray in Champaign County cover a period of more than a quarter of a century. In the quiet performance of his duty he has attended a large private practice, and has likewise become well known through his work in behalf of local institutions and as a citizen. Doctor Gray is in the front rank of surgeons in this section of Illinois. Doctor Gray was born in DeWitt County, Illinois, January 23, 1866. His parents were Worship and Mary Elizabeth (Salisbury) Gray. His father, who was born in County Cavan, Ireland, in 1833, came to America, and about 1863 located in DeWitt County, Illinois, becoming a farmer. He also for many years did an extensive business as a stock and grain buyer and shipper. His death occurred in 1905 when about seventy-three years of age. After coming to Illinois he married Mary Elizabeth Williams, a widow. She died in 1908. By her first marriage to Mr. Williams she had three children: Ella, wife of Silas Hand, at Champaign, well known in real estate circles; and Ira and Annie, deceased. Worship Gray and wife also had three children: Fred S., living in Florida; Doctor Gray; and Worship, now deceased. Doctor Gray during his boyhood attended the country schools and also the graded school, and his higher education was largely...

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Biography of James P. Gray

Thirty-five years have passed since James P. Gray came to Idaho to cast in his lot with its pioneers. People of the present end-of-the-century period can scarcely realize the struggles and dangers which attended the early settlers, the heroism and self-sacrifice of lives passed upon the borders of civilization, the hardships endured, the difficulties overcome. These tales of the early days read almost like a romance to those who have known only the modern prosperity and conveniences. To the pioneer of the early days, far removed from the privileges and conveniences of city or town, the struggle for existence was a stern and hard one, and these men and women must have possessed indomitable energies and sterling worth of character, as well as marked physical courage, when they thus voluntarily selected such a life and successfully fought its battles under such circumstances as prevailed in the northwest. James P. Gray was a young man of eighteen years when he took up his residence in the mining camp at Idaho City. His early life was spent in Illinois, his birth having occurred in Peoria County, that state, December 10, 1846. He is of Scotch-Irish ancestry, and his grandfather, William Gray, emigrated from the north of Ireland with his wife, taking up his residence in Indiana, where occurred the birth of Thomas Gray, the father of our subject. In the Hoosier...

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