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Surname: Goodwin

Narratives of Rogers, Goodwin, Toogood – Indian Captivities

Three Narratives of Excessive Distress of Persons Taken at the Destruction of Salmon Falls, in the State of New Hampshire, on the Twenty-Seventh of March, 1690; Viz., The Cruel Torture of Robert Rogers, the Five Years’ Captivity of Mehetable Goodwin, and the Fortunate Escape of Thomas Toogood. From the Magnalia Christi Americana, of Doctor Cotton Mather.

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Slave Narrative of Amanda Oliver

Person Interviewed: Amanda Oliver Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Missouri Date of Birth: November 9, 1857 Age: 80 I ‘membuh what my mother say, I was born November 9, 1857, in Missouri. I was ’bout eight years old, when she was sold to a master named Harrison Davis. They said he had two farms in Missouri, but when he moved to northern Texas he brought me, my mother, Uncle George, Uncle Dick and a cullud girl they said was 15 with ‘im. He owned ’bout 6 acres on de edge of town near Sherman, Texas, and my mother and ’em was all de slaves he had. They said he sold off some of de folks. We didn’t have no overseers in northern Texas, but in southern Texas dey did. Dey didn’t raise cotton either: but dey raised a whole lots of corn. Sometime de men would shuck corn all night long. Whenever dey was going to shuck all night de women would piece quilts while de men shuck de corn and you could hear ’em singing and shucking corn. After de cornshucking, de cullud folks would have big dances. Master Davis lived in a big white frame house. My mother lived in the yard in a big one-room log hut with a brick chimney. De logs was “pinted” (what dey call plastered now with line). I don’t...

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Biography of Moses H. Goodwin

The history of mankind is replete with illustrations of the fact that it is only under the pressure of adversity and the stimulus of opposition that the best and strongest in men are brought out and developed. Perhaps the history of no people so forcibly impresses one with this truth as the annals of our own republic: and certainly in our own land the palm must be awarded to New England’s sturdy sons. If anything can inspire the youth of our country to persistent, honorable and laudable endeavor it should be the life record of such men as he of whom we write. The example of the illustrious few of our countrymen who have risen from obscurity to the highest positions in the gift of the nation serves often to awe our young men rather than to inspire them to emulation, because they reason that only a few can ever attain such eminence; but the history of such men as M. H. Goodwin proves conclusively that with a reasonable amount of mental and physical power success is bound, eventually, to crown the endeavors of those who have the ambition to put forth their best efforts, and the will and manliness to persevere therein. The history of the Goodwin family shows that four brothers of the name, natives of England, crossed the Atlantic and located in New Hampshire. Aaron Goodwin,...

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Biography of William C. Goodwin, Rev.

Rev. William C. Goodwin. In the death of Rev. William C. Goodwin, which occurred at his home in Moline, Kansas, May 12, 1913, that community lost a much loved citizen and there passed away a character which in strength and in service deserves more than passing mention. Largely in the words of a friend and admirer who wrote of him the following biography had been prepared for this publication. He was born at Massena Center in St. Lawrence County, New York, September 3, 1837. His father, Daniel Goodwin, was born and reared in New Hampshire; his mother, Elvira Clark, in Chatham, Lower Canada. He was of Puritan stock and ancestry. St. Lawrence is the northeast county of New York and had the vigorous climate and sterile soil peculiar to the northern New England states. Daniel Goodwin was a typical Yankee. He possessed in full measure the enterprise, courage and piety of that race. In his youth he spent some years on the ocean. His son related that at one time his father was one of the crew of an American privateer in the War of 1812. While off the coast of South America the ship was overhauled by a British man-of-war. The American skipper took a vote of his crew as to whether they should fight or surrender. Young Goodwin voted to fight. From some memories of his early...

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Biography of Arthur Winford Goodwin

Arthur Winford Goodwin. When the details of his career have been examined it will be seen that Arthur W. Goodwin had been the architect of a successful career in commercial fields. He started at the bottom, laboring as a boy in country stores to pay his own way in the world. He gained more than mere wages. All those early experiences he had turned to profit since he became a business man on his own account, and at the present time he is a member of the firm which conducts the largest department and general merchandise establishment at Howard, in Elk County. He is of an old American family. The Goodwins came from England and settled in New Hampshire in Colonial days. His grandfather, Daniel Goodwin, was a native of New Hampshire, where he was born in 1795. Little more than a boy, he served as a soldier in the War of 1812. He subsequently became an early settler in Louisville, New York, where he followed the trade of carpenter and the business of farmer until his death in 1883 at the venerable age of eighty-eight. The father of the Howard merchant was Rev. W. C. Goodwin, who became well known in Kansas as a pioneer minister of the Methodist Church, and whose career is sketched above. Rev. Mr. Goodwin married Miss Ellen Southworth, who was born in Louisville,...

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Rough Riders

Compiled military service records for 1,235 Rough Riders, including Teddy Roosevelt have been digitized. The records include individual jackets which give the name, organization, and rank of each soldier. They contain cards on which information from original records relating to the military service of the individual has been copied. Included in the main jacket are carded medical records, other documents which give personal information, and the description of the record from which the information was obtained.

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Biography of George W. Goodwin

GEORGE W. GOODWIN. – Mr. Goodwin enjoys the no slight distinction of having been the first settler of the now populous Yakima valley, and also has the great credit of still leading in its business and political affairs, and is one of those who gives tone and trend to popular ideas in the community. He was born in Illinois in 1846, and is the second son of Lewis H. and Priscilla Thompson Goodwin. His early years in that state were spent in an abundance of work on the farm in the summers, and in winter by obtaining his education at the public school. In 1865 the family crossed the plains with ox-teams, and, having the courage belonging only to self-made and self-directing people, located a claim in the then virgin fields of the Upper Yakima. This was between the sites of two cities as they stand to-day; and therefore every step in the growth of these places, one of which is almost certain to become the capital of the new state of Washington, has been taken under Mr. Goodwin’s eyes, and a large part done under his direction or with his cooperation. The cabin in which the family first lived was the first in the old town. It was not long before the shadow came to cloud the brightness of its hearthstone. The mother, who had accompanied the little...

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Biography of A. Goodwin

A. Goodwin one of the members of the city council at Santa Ana, is a native of O the Golden State, being born in San Joaquin County, June 24, 1854. His parents were A. D. and Amantha (Brofee) Goodwin, the former a native of New York State, and the latter of Wisconsin. The senior Goodwin came to California in 1852, and engaged in mining for a time, and subsequently in agriculture, his death occurring at Tustin, January 9, 1886. The subject of this sketch, the eldest of his parents’ four children, was educated at the Washington High School in Stockton, graduating in 1873. He soon bought a ranch in San Joaquin County, whereon he followed farming until 1883. In 1880, however, he came to what is now Orange County and bought property west of Santa Ana, on the Los Bolsas tract, on which he erected a cheese factory and carried on the business for six years. He then became a citizen of Santa Ana. Here he purchased seventeen and one-half acres on North Main street, which he has laid out as the Goodwin addition to the city. The boundaries of it are, on the north, Seventeenth street; east, Wells and Shafer streets; south, Washington avenue; and west, Main street. This addition is laid out into lots, on which many beautiful residences have been erected. Mr. Goodwin also owns valuable...

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Biographical Sketch of Israel Goodwin

ISRAEL GOODWIN, remembered by many for his clear intellect and social qualities, resided at the Flat, and in his earlier days worked at cloth-dressing. He married Miss Betsey Melendy, and about the year 1824 removed to Plainfield, Vt., where he occupied a prominent position; was Representative two years, and State Senator two years. He was appointed Judge and removed to Montpelier, where he died. He exerted a wide influence, and was esteemed one of the most correct and competent business men in the...

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Biographical Sketch of Israel Goodwin

ISRAEL GOODWIN was remarkable for his intellectual and social qualities. He lived at the Flat, and was a cloth-dresser by trade. In 1824 he removed to Plainfield, VT, where he represented that town in both branches of the Legislature. He was appointed judge, and removed to Montpelier, where he...

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