Surname: Gentry

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

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1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

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Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In...

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Disbursements to Cherokees under the Treaty of May 6, 1828

Abstract of disbursements and expenditures made by George Vashon, Indian Agent for the Cherokees west of the Mississippi, under the stipulations of the Treaty with said tribe of 6th May, 1828, between the 16th September, 1830, and the 31st December, 1833. In total this list represents 390 Cherokee families and 1835 individuals who each received 25.75 as part of their payment under the 5th article of the treaty of 6th May, 1828.

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Biographical Sketch of David Gentry

David Gentry, of Virginia, married Jane Kendrick, and settled in Madison County, Ky. They had Bright B., Pleasant, David, Dickey, Martin, Bailey, and five daughters. Bright B. married Martha Jones, and they had James, Margaret, David, Jonathan J., Eliza, Susan, Albert, and Fanny. David settled in Montgomery County in 1833, and married Polly A. Groom. Jonathan also settled in Montgomery County in 1833, and married Elizabeth...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. William M. Gentry

Gentry, Mrs. William M. (See Hicks)— Margaret, daughter of Robert Ray and Cynthia Jane (Horn) Taylor, was born Nov. 10, 1873, educated at Worcester Academy, and Willie Halsell College, Vinita. Married at Weston, Texas, April 18, 1891, William M. Son of W. J. and Nancy A. Gentry, born August 10, 1871, in Ray County, Missouri. They are the parents of: Ralph Ray, born July 7, 1893; Blanche Sunbeam, born Oct. 15, 1896; Christopher Robert, born March 23, 1900; Winnie Gertrude, born April 7, 1902; Hearst T., born May 6, 1904; William Lee, born April 30, 1908; Annie Audrey, born January 28., 1910; Ruth, born Dec. 28, 1912, and Juna Gentry, born March 2, 1916. True to the family custom, Wiliam M. Gentry is a farmer and raiser of thoroughbred saddle stock at his splendidly equipped Rose Valley Farm. Jeremiah Horn, a white man, married Elsie, the daughter of Chief Charles R. Hicks and their son, William Horn, married Mar­garet Leadbetter, and they were the parents of Cynthia 3. Horn, born in Texas, Novem­ber 29, 1847. Married in March, 1871, Robert Ray Taylor, born in Tennessee, November 20, 1847. Chief Charles R. Hicks, on whom an ex­tended sketch is given in the historical text was the son of Nathan and Elizabeth (Broom) Hicks, his mother being a daughter of Chief Broom of Broomtown, where his first printed Cherokee law was...

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Biography of Allen Gentry

ALLEN GENTRY. This gentleman is one of the oldest and best known pioneers of Stone County, which has been his home since 1836, a period of over fifty-eight years. The founder of the family in this section was Allen Gentry, Sr., father of subject, a native of Tennessee, where the family was an old and prominent one, and a descendant of Revolutionary stock. He was married in his native State to Miss Margaret , and in the spring of 1836 he and wife crossed the Mississippi River and located on James River, near Galena, in Stone County, where the father followed farming. He was a stanch Republican in politics, and in religion he and family held to the Christian faith. He made his home in Stone County until he had paid the last debt of nature, and there reared to honorable maturity a family of eleven children, seven sons and four daughters, leaving them, upon his death, not only a good property to divide among themselves, but what was rather to be desired than great riches-the heritage of an honorable name. Allen Gentry, Jr., was born in Tennessee June 12, 1814, and was but a boy when the family came with ox-team to Stone County. He received no schooling, and all his leisure time in early life was spent in hunting the wild game, which was plentiful in the...

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Slave Narrative of James Baker

Interviewer: Mary D. Hudgins Person Interviewed: James Baker Location: With daughter who own home at 941 Wade St., Hot Springs, Arkansas Age: 81 The outskirts of eastern Hot Springs resemble a vast checkerboard—patterned in Black and White. Within two blocks of a house made of log-faced siding—painted a spotless white and provided with blue shutters will be a shack which appears to have been made from the discard of a dozen generations of houses. Some of the yards are thick with rusting cans, old tires and miscelaneous rubbish. Some of them are so gutted by gully wash that any attempt at beautification would be worse than useless. Some are swept—farm fashion—free from surface dust and twigs. Some attempt—others achieve grass and flowers. Vegetable gardens are far less frequent then they should be, considering space left bare. The interviewer frankly lost her way several times. One improper direction took her fully half a mile beyond her destination. From a hilltop she could look down on less elevated hills and into narrow valleys. The impression was that of a cheaply painted back-drop designed for a “stock” presentation of “Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch.” Moving along streets, alleys and paths backward “toward town” the interviewer reached another hill. Almost a quarter of a mile away she spied an old colored man sunning himself on the front porch of a well kept...

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Clyde H. Gentry

Private., Batry. E, 81st Div., 317th F. Artly.; son of Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Gentry; of Rockingham County. Entered service April 1, 1918, at Madison, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson. Transferred to Camp Mills. Sailed for France Aug. 8, 1918. Returned to USA June 8, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., June 8,...

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Gentry, Wanda L. Coffinberry Mrs. – Obituary

Wanda L. Gentry, 83, of Ontario, who with her husband established the Gentry Ford Sales dealership, died July 27, 2005, at her home in the Meadow Brook Retirement Center. Her funeral will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday at St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Ontario. Ontario’s Lienkaemper Chapel is in charge of arrangements. Wanda was born on March 18, 1922, at Portland to Walter B. and Verna D. Coffinberry. The family lived at Portland until 1926 when they relocated to Hot Lake and subsequently moved to Halfway in 1928. Wanda was a 1940 Halfway High School graduate. She moved to Portland after high school to attend business school. Wanda married her high school sweetheart, Keith Gentry, on April 4, 1942. She continued to live and work in Portland during World War II while Keith was serving in the U.S. Navy. After Keith’s discharge, they moved to Baker City where they owned and operated the Third and B Market, a small grocery and convenience store. In 1949, Wanda and Keith moved to Pendleton where Keith got his start in the automobile business. In 1952, they purchased the Ford Dealership at Weiser, Idaho. In 1958, they purchased the Ford dealership in Ontario and established Gentry Ford Sales Inc. Wanda was very active and involved in the business operations of the dealership throughout her life. Wanda was a member of St. Matthew’s Episcopal...

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Gentry, France P. “Pat” Guy Mrs. – Obituary

Baker City, Oregon France P. “Pat” Gentry, 80, of Baker City, died Aug. 6, 2004, at St. Elizabeth Health Center. Her funeral will be 1 p.m. Thursday at Coles Funeral Home. Pastor Jack Bynum of the United Methodist Church will officiate. Interment will be at Mount Hope Cemetery. Visitations will be until 7 o’clock tonight at the funeral home. She was born in 1924 at Stuttgart, Ark., to Frank and Anna Sanders Guy. She was raised by her uncle and aunt, Horce and Minnie Jackson, at Mound City, Ill., where she attended school. She was a 1942 Mound City High School graduate. She married Robert P. Gentry in 1943. They settled at Baker City in 1947. She worked as a housekeeper for the Baker Hotel from 1948 through the 1960s. She worked at numerous motels and retired from housekeeping after working at the old St. Elizabeth Nursing Home in 1987 after 13 years. Survivors include her sons, Homer Gentry and his wife, Bonnie, of Baker City, and Carl Gentry and his wife, Trina, of Benton City, Wash.; daughters, Katherine Gentry of Baker City and Sheila Esquibel and her husband, Wayne, of Gillette, Wyo.; 12 grandchildren and 21 great-grandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents; a sister, Ruby Lawrence; her husband, Robert P. Gentry; daughter, Pamela S. Haggard; and grandson, Dennis E. Allen....

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