Surname: Garner

1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East...

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Slave Narrative of Lucy Brooks

Interviewer: Guthrie Person Interviewed: Lucy Brooks Location: Forest Glen, Maryland Place of Residence: Forest Glen, Montgomery County, Md. References: Interview with Aunt Lucy and her son, Lafayette Brooks. Aunt Lucy, an ex-slave, lives with her son, Lafayette Brooks, in a shack on the Carroll Inn Springs property at Forest Glen, Montgomery County, Md. To go to her home from Rockville, leave the Court House going east on Montgomery Ave. and follow US Highway No. 240, otherwise known as the Rockville Pike, in its southeasterly direction, four and one half miles to the junction with it on the left (east) of the Garrett Park Road. This junction is directly opposite the entrance to the Georgetown Preparatory School, which is on the west of this road. Turn left on the Garrett Park Road and follow it through that place and crossing Rock Creek go to Kensington. Here cross the tracks of the B.&O. R.R. and parallel them onward to Forest Glen. From the railroad station in this place go onward to Forest Glen. From the railroad station in this place go onward on the same road to the third lane branching off to the left. This lane will be identified by the sign “Carroll Springs Inn”. Turn left here and enter the grounds of the inn. But do not go up in front of the inn itself which is one quarter...

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Biographical Sketch of George Garner

George Garner, proprietor of Woodbine barbershop and temperance billiard hall, was born near Council Bluffs, Ia., in April 1855. In 1861 removed with parents to Raglan Township Harrison County, and in Dec., 1881, he bought out the fixtures of Ohio. Elkins, and keeps a strictly temperance hall, with lunch bar in...

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Biography of William M. Garner

WILLIAM M. GARNER. This gentleman is a substantial citizen of Quitman, Arkansas, of which city he has been a resident since 1858. His uncle, W. W. Garner, was the first resident of the town, having located there in 1856. William M. Garner was born in Lawrence County, Arkansas, in 1844, his father, Isaac C. Garner, having been a native of South Carolina. On coming to Arkansas he first located in Jackson County, then moved to Lawrence County and finally settled in Scott County, where he died. He was a farmer and stockraiser and in 1854 took a drove of stock across the plains, the journey to California occupying ten months. He sold his herd and returned home via the Isthmus of Panama, and here, in 1856, he was called from life at the age of forty-two years. His first wife, who lived but a few months after their marriage, was a Miss Williams and his second wife was Elnora Garner, who is still living at the age of seventy-three years. She is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, as was her husband. Of six children born to them three are now living: William M.; Mrs. Sarah Leigh, of Choctaw, Arkansas, and Mrs. Mary T. Allen, who resides at Sugar Loaf, Sebastian County, Arkansas. The subject of this sketch received his education in an old-time log school house of...

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Garner, B. Joyce Colter – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon B. Joyce Colter Garner, 59, of La Grande died Nov. 15 at St. Alphonsus Hospital in Boise. No public services are planned at this time. Arrangements are under the care of Daniels Chapel of the Valley. Joyce was born March 21, 1947, in Birmingham, Ala., to Hermit and Opal Garner. She was educated in Alabama and moved to Oregon in 1970. She loved spending time with her grandchildren and talking with her family living in the South. She also enjoyed crocheting and knitting. Survivors include her daughters, Erica Garner, Lillian Keeling and Kelly Thweatt, all of La Grande; six grandchildren; one brother, Anthony Garner; three sisters; and other relatives. She was preceded in death by an older sister and two brothers, Wayne and George Garner. Memorial contributions may be made to Erica Garner in care of Daniels Chapel of the Valley, 1502 Seventh Street, La Grande 97850. The Observer, Obituaries for the week ending Nov. 25, 2006, Published: November 25,...

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Biographical Sketch of J. S. Garner, M. D.

J. S. Garner, M. D., Salisbury; was born in Russell Co., Ky., Oct. 14, 1831; at the age of 18, he went to Lancaster, Garrard Co., Ky., where he studied medicine in the office of J. S. Pierce, M. D., for three years; after which, he attended a course of lectures in Louisville, Ky., and commenced the practice of medicine in Wayne Co., Ky., and continued there up to the year 1863, when, having recruited. Co. K, 48th Regt. Ky. Vols., was elected its First Lieutenant, and, having served for eighteen months in our late civil war, moved to Salisbury, Coles Co., and has been practicing medicine there ever since. He has held the office of Postmaster for ten years, and holds it at the present time. He married in Wayne Co., Ky., April 24, 1854, Miss Minnie E. Roberts, daughter of ‘Squire Roberts; they have seven children – Mary E., Emma A., John P. L., Minnie M., Viola B., Edwin M. S. and Lulu...

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Biography of F. Garner

F. Garner, residing on Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, was born near Quincy, Illinois, March 5, 1835. His parents were George and Elizabeth Garner. His father moved to Nauvoo, Illinois, at an early day, and remained there one year when he crossed the plains to Utah, where he spent one winter. Frank was fifteen years of age when they left the Missouri river, and he drove an ox team all the way to California. While crossing the Missouri river on a ferry-boat, the team which he afterward drove became frightened and jumped off the boat into the water, and swam across safely with the yoke on. They left St. Joe with a train of sixty wagons in the spring of 1850, but many died on the way of cholera. The train being so long they divided it into six divisions of ten wagons each, and took turns leading. The ten wagons that led one day fell behind the next. George Garner was captain of ten wagons, and one day he was to lead he told his men to follow, and do hard driving, and by that means they would leave the rest behind, which they did, and got to the end of the journey just two weeks in advance of the rest. They lost two of their number by cholera and had some trouble with the Indians. Mr. Garner...

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Margaret Garner and Seven Others – Fugitive Slave Law

Of this recent and peculiarly painful case we give a somewhat detailed account, mainly taken from the Cincinnati papers of the day. About ten o’clock on Sunday, 27th January, 1856, a party of eight slaves – —two men, two women, and four children— – belonging to Archibald K. Gaines and John Marshall, of Richwood Station, Boone County, Kentucky, about sixteen miles from Covington, escaped from their owners. Three of the party are father, mother, and son, whose names are Simon, Mary, and Simon, Jr.; the others are Margaret, wife of Simon, Jr., and her four children. The three first are the property of Marshall, and the others of Gaines. They took a sleigh and two horses belonging to Mr. Marshall, and drove to the river bank, opposite Cincinnati, and crossed over to the city on the ice. They were missed a few hours after their flight, and Mr. Gaines, springing on a horse, followed in pursuit. On reaching the river shore, he learned that a resident had found the horses standing in the road. He then crossed over to the City, and after a few hours diligent inquiry, he learned that his slaves were in a house about a quarter of a mile below the Mill Creek Bridge, on the river road, occupied by a colored man named Kite. He proceeded to the office of United States Commissioner John...

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Biography of John H. Garner

John H. Garner veterinary surgeon, Santa Ana, was horn in Ogden City, Utah, June 26, 1850, the fourth son of John and Olive (Rossen) Garner, the former a native of North Carolina and the latter of Missouri. His father was one of the pioneers who crossed the plains to California in 1851 with ox teams, locating in San Bernardino, where he followed farming for a period of twenty-eight years. He died at the age of sixty-one years. J. H., our subject, at the age of twenty-one years started out in the world for himself. He had previously, at the age of fourteen years, mastered many of the principles of the profession which he has so successfully practiced ever since. He was naturally a student, and at the age of eighteen years he was a proficient veterinary surgeon. At this time he was given the responsible charge of race horses. He began business by buying lame and diseased horses, curing them and selling them at advanced figures. This he followed until 1870, when he teamed for a year on the desert. After this he put teams on the construction of the railroad to Spadra, and ran the veterinary business along-side. In 1878 he moved to Newport, where he followed farming until he was washed out by the floods. In 1884, with a sick family and being $800 in debt, he...

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