Surname: Gano

Biography of Abraham Stites

Abraham Stites was a son of Dr. John Stites, and was born in Elizabeth, New Jersey, during the Revolutionary war, and with his mother was removed into a cellar to avoid danger resulting from a sharp engagement then going on between the British soldiers and the rebels of that day. A singular coincidence in the life of Mr. Stites is that he died in February, 1864, in Hopkinsville, during a skirmish here between the Confederate and Federal troops. He, with a large family connection of the Ganos and Stiteses, removed from New Jersey to the Ohio Valley in 1808, carrying their goods on horseback across the mountains to Pittsburgh, and thence by flat-boats to Cincinnati; his father’s family settled near Georgetown, Kentucky. Mr. Stites had been educated for a lawyer, and licensed as such by Chancellor Kent. He commenced practice at Georgetown, and soon after married Miss Ann Johnson, daughter of Col. Henry Johnson, a Revolutionary soldier. In 1818 he removed to Hopkinsville, where he resided until his death. Mr. Stites was a man of fine education, and devoted to belles letters and literary pursuits. He was a good lawyer – an excellent counselor – but seldom, after becoming a county official, made any charge for legal advice. He was the confidant of many of the wealthiest men of the county, but was so opposed to litigation, that on...

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Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to...

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Slave Narrative of Harriet Mason

Interviewer: Sue Higgins Person Interviewed: Harriet Mason Location: Garrard County, Kentucky Age: 100 Story of Aunt Harriet Mason age 100-a slave girl: “When I was seven years old my missis took me to Bourbon County, when we got to Lexington I tried to run off and go back to Bryantsville to see my mammy. Mas’r Gano told me if I didn’t come the sheriff would git me. I never liked to go to Lexington since. “One Sunday we was going to a big meetin’ we heared som’in rattling in the weeds. It was a big snake, it made a track in the dust. When we got home missis asked me if I killed any snakes. I said to missis, snake like to got me and Gilbert, too. “They used to have dances at Mrs. Dickerson’s, a neighbor of General Gano (a preacher in the Christian Church). Mrs. Dickerson wouldn’t let the “Padaroes” come to the dances. If they did come, whe[TR:she?] would get her pistol and make them leave. “When General Gano went from Texas to Kentucky, he brought 650 head of horses. He sold all of them but Old Black. “Mas’r Gano went back to Texas to take up a child he had buried there. The boat blowed up, and he came nigh gittin’ drowned. “One time I wus out in Mas’rs wheat field. I would get the...

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