Surname: Gamble

Lowell Massachusetts Genealogy

Tracing ancestors in Lowell, Massachusetts online and for free has been greatly enhanced by the University of Massachusetts in Lowell which provided digitized version of a large quantity of the Lowell public records. Combined with the cemetery and census records available freely online, you should be able to easily trace your ancestors from the founding of Lowell in 1826 through 1940, the last year of available census records. To add color to the otherwise basic facts of your ancestors existence we provide free access to a wide range of manuscripts on the history of Lowell, it’s manufactures and residents.

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Biographical Sketch of James M. F. Gamble

James Madison Fletcher, son of William and Elizabeth (Plunkett) Gamble, was born in Indiana May 31, 1856. Married May 31, 1882 Julia Ann, daughter of Samuel and Mary Ann (Fish) Wheeler. They are the parents of Verdie Ansell, born April 12, 1883, is a Mason and Woodman of the World, married Ethel Sutton; Bernice Gordon, born April 5, 1885; Dudley Martin, born October 18, 1888, married Flo Waybrigh and Otto Erick Gamble, born March 11,...

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Slave Narrative of Mary Scott

Interviewer: Mrs. Lucile Young & H. Grady Davis Person Interviewed: Mary Scott Location: Gourdin, South Carolina Age: 90 Ex-Slave, About 90 years old “Where and when were you born?” “On Gaston Gamble place, between here and Greeleville. In da Gamble’s Bible is my age. Don’t know my age. Pretty much know how old, I bout 90. I wuz little girl when freedom come.” “Give the names of your father and mother.” “Father, John Davis. Mother, Tina Davis. Belonged to last mausa. Darby Fulton. Gamble sold mama and three children to Fulton. Belonged to Davis after freedom. Father belonged to Davis. Take first mausa’s name. Sold to Arnold Mouzon. Didn’t take Mouzon name.” “Where did your father and mother come from?” “Right where Grandma go, Gamble place.” “Did you have any brothers and sisters?” “James and Benjamin. All ded.” “Describe the beds and where you slept.” “Had plenty slaves. I don’t know exactly how many. In dem times you know, we had to get ticket to go to see dere family.” “What kind of house did you have to live in?” “Better dan dis. Better dan dis. Good house. Sleep on wooden bed. Straw and feather mattress.” “Do you remember anything about your grandparents or any stories told you about them?” “I ain’t know my grandmother, grandfather either.” “What work did you do in slavery times.” “Didn’t do no kind...

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Biographical Sketch of M. W. Gamble

M. W. Gamble is a native of Indiana and one of eight children, four sons and four daughters. His father was a native of Pennsylvania and his mother was born in Virginia. They removed from Kentucky to Indiana in 1857 and lived there about twenty years going from there to Illinois and settling in Logan county, twenty-five miles northeast of Springfield. From there they went to Keokuk county, Iowa, where the mother died, and the father returned to Illinois where he died. M. W. Gamble was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth L. Randolph, of Logan county, Illinois, August 30, 1847, the Rev. James Woodard, of the Methodist church, officiating. Mr. and Mrs. Gamble became the parents of ten children; namely, Mary E., born September 19, 1848, died October 16, 1876; William W., born November 23, 1849; Randolph, born November 13, 1851, died on the 26th of the same month; Medora A., born December 24, 1852, died January 3, 1853; Columbus J. and Joseph S., twins, born February 3, 1854, died on the 22d and 23d, respectively, of the same month; Sarah A., born October 16, 1855; Hattie I., born September 20, 1857, died February 9, 1860; Stephen A. D., born August 20, 1860; and Elizabeth F., born in October, 1862, died May 4, 1865. Mr. Gamble came to Jefferson township in the fall of 1866, and in 1867...

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Slave Narrative of John W. H. Barnett

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Location: Marianna, Arkansas Age: 81 “I was born at Clinton Parish, Louisiana. I’m eighty-one years old. My parents and four children was sold and left six children behind. They kept the oldest children. In that way I was sold but never alone. Our family was divided and that brought grief to my parents. We was sold on a block at New Orleans. J.J. Gambol (Gamble?) in north Louisiana bought us. After freedom I seen all but one of our family. I don’t recollect why that was. “For three weeks steady after the surrender people was passing from the War and for two years off and on somebody come along going home. Some rode and some had a cane or stick walking. Mother was cooking a pot of shoulder meat. Them blue soldiers come by and et it up. I didn’t get any I know that. They cleaned us out. Father was born at Eastern Shore, Maryland. He was about half Indian. Mother’s mother was a squaw. I’m more Indian than Negro. Father said it was a white man’s war. He didn’t go to war. Mother was very dark. He spoke a broken tongue. “We worked on after freedom for the man we was owned by. We worked crops and patches. I didn’t see much difference then. I see a big change come out of it....

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Gamble, Julia Florence Beatty – Obituary

Mrs. Julia F. Gamble, formerly of Hutchinson, died at midnight Tuesday [June 30] at her home in Tribune. Funeral will be at 10 a.m. Friday at the Tribune Methodist Church. Mrs. Gamble is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Bertha Kauffman and a son, Ralph Gamble, both of Tribune. Hutchinson News Herald, July 1, 1953 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Gamble, Henry M. – Obituary

Henry M. Gamble, 74, resident of Hutchinson 50 years, died in his home, 1540 East Fourth, at 4:45 yesterday afternoon after a long illness. He was born in Nokomis, Ill., and came to Hutchinson 50 years ago, working in produce and wholesale houses many years before opening his own grocery. Survivors are his widow, Mrs. Julia [Beatty] Gamble; a daughter, Mrs. Bertha Kaufman of Tribune; a son, Ralph Gamble of Houston, Tex.; five grandchildren and two great grandchildren. Hutchinson New, March 11, 1942 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Biographies of the Cherokee Indians

Whatever may be their origins in antiquity, the Cherokees are generally thought to be a Southeastern tribe, with roots in Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee, among other states, though many Cherokees are identified today with Oklahoma, to which they had been forcibly removed by treaty in the 1830s, or with the lands of the Eastern Band of Cherokees in western North Carolina. The largest of the so-called Five Civilized Tribes, which also included Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks, and Seminoles, the Cherokees were the first tribe to have a written language, and by 1820 they had even adopted a form of...

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