Surname: Freeman

1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

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The Descendants of John H. Blackwell

The Descendants of John H. Blackwell is a 62 page manuscript typewritten on onion skinned paper by Julia Ann Blackwell Ketchum. In it Mrs. Blackwell provides the descendants of John H. Blackwell who was born in 1793 in Sumter County, South Carolina; he died between 1870-1880 and was buried at Boles Arkansas. He married in 1824 in Tennessee to Sarah ???. Sarah was born abt 1804 in Tennessee and died between 1851-1859. She was also buried at Boles Arkansas. John H. Blackwell married 2nd 1851-1859 to Malinda ???. Malinda was born abt 1810 in Kentucky, and was buried between...

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1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East...

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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Exira Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Akers, Lincoln. Wf. Mary; ch. Otto, Laura, Cleo, Bryon, Trilby, Lincoln, Lilly, Vinona, Frank,Alvia, Lewis, Robert and Carol. P. O. Brayton,R. 1. O. 25 ac., sec. 21. (52.) Albertson, Lars. Wf. Hannah; ch. Harry P., Mabel C. and ArnoldN. P. O. Brayton, R. 1. O. 80 ac., sec. 32; O. 80 ac., sec. 29. (11.) Anderson, A. F. Wf. Otilla; ch. Arthur, Vera, Edith, Max and Raymond. P. O. Brayton, R. I. O. 40 ac., sec. 29; O. 119.50 ac.,...

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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Biographical Sketch of Captain Joseph Hatch

Captain Joseph Hatch came to Norwich with his elder brother, John, and located at the south end of Norwich Plain, where he built himself a log cabin on a site near the building now standing and formerly used by the late David Merrill for a paint shop. Subsequently, in 1771, he built the house on the opposite side of the way (now known as the Messenger house) which is believed to have been the first frame dwelling house erected at the Plain. He became the owner of a large amount of land, embracing much of the southern and eastern...

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Baxter Family of Norwich Vermont

The Baxters of this town came here from Norwich, Connecticut, a town which their ancestors with others from Norwich, England, assisted in founding about the year 1632. Elihu Baxter, with his young wife, Tryphena Taylor, to whom he was married October 24, 1777, arrived in Norwich the same year, and here fifteen children (six daughters and nine sons) were born to them, twelve of whom lived to grow up and have families of their own. Mr. Baxter settled on the farm that subsequently became the home of Hon. Paul Brigham. He later removed to the farm where Orson Sargent lives, and there built himself a frame house, a part of which is now in use by the present owner of the property. Of his children: William Baxter, the eldest, born August 3, 1778, studied law with Hon. Daniel A. Buck of Norwich, and removed to Bennington, Vt., where he soon became the leading lawyer in that part of the state, and received many honors from his town and county. He married Lydia Ashley of Norwich, August 17, 1779, and died at Bennington October 1, 1826, aged forty nine years. Hiram Baxter settled in Bennington a little after 1800. Elihu Baxter, Jr., the third child, born in 1781, died at Portland, Me., in 1863, where he had been in the practice of medicine for many years. Chester Baxter, born in...

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Migration of Families out of Norwich VT

At the first enumeration of the inhabitants of eastern Vermont, as made by the authority of New York in 1771, Norwich was found to be the most populous of all the towns of Windsor County, having forty families and 206 inhabitants. Windsor followed with 203, and Hartford was third with 190. The aggregate population of the county (ten towns reported) was then but 1,205, mostly confined to the first and second tiers of towns west of the Connecticut River. Twenty years later, in 1791, Hartland led all the towns of the county with 1,652 inhabitants, Woodstock and Windsor coming next with 1,605 and 1,542 respectively. Exceptional causes made the little town of Guilford (now numbering scarcely more than one thousand inhabitants), till after the year 1800, the most populous town in the state. In Norwich, the great falling off in the size of families in recent years is seen in the fact, that in the year 1800, the number of children of school age was 604, out of a total population of 1,486, while in 1880 with a nearly equal population (1,471) it was but 390. In the removal of large numbers of the native-born inhabitants by emigration, we must find the principal cause of the decline of our rural population. Preeminently is this true of Norwich. The outflow of people began very early and now for more than...

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Norwich Vermont in the Revolutionary War

The sources of information in regard to the part taken by the town in the Revolutionary struggle are few and scanty. The earliest allusion in the town records to this important epoch of the country’s history is found in the election of a Committee of Safety at the annual town meeting, March 11, 1777. This committee was five in number: Deacon Joseph Smalley, Samuel Hutchinson, John Hatch, Captain Hezekiah Johnson and John Hopson. There is much reason to believe, however, that this was not the first Committee of Safety that acted for the town; but was a new committee selected to conform to a recommendation made to the towns in Cumberland and Gloucester Counties by the Convention at Westminster which declared the independence of Vermont the preceding January. 1Governor and Council, Vol. I, p. 47. It is pretty certain that a company of militia was organized in Norwich as early as the year 1774 or 1775. Of this company Peter Olcott was chosen Captain and Thomas Murdock, Ensign, doubtless by the votes of the men enrolled in the same. The company was probably a purely voluntary organization of patriotic young men, in Colonel Seth Warner‘s regiment of Rangers in 1775, in the continental service. Colonel Timothy Bedell, of Haverhill, N. H., also raised a regiment the same year for service in Canada. Fresh regiments were enlisted early in the...

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The Founding of Norwich Vermont

As we have already seen, Norwich virtually had its origin in the colony of Connecticut in the year 1761. On the 26th day of August of that year, at the house of William Waterman, inn-holder, in the town of Mansfield, in said colony, were convened the proprietors or grantees of a newly granted township of land situated 150 miles away to the northward, in a wilderness country then just beginning to be known as the “New Hampshire Grants.” These men were assembled to decide upon the first steps to be taken to open up to settlement and improvement a tract of forest six miles square located on the west bank of Connecticut River forty miles north of Charlestown, New Hampshire (Fort Number Four), then the farthest outpost of civilization in the upper valley of that river. At the time of which we are speaking all that portion of the present state of New Hampshire lying west of the intervals of the Merrimac in the vicinity of Concord was entirely uninhabited, and lay in the primitive wildness of nature. A few townships along that river above Concord had been surveyed and located, and thither a few resolute pioneers had already penetrated, among them Captain Ebenezar Webster, the father of the future expounder of the Constitution, whose cabin was at one time, it is said, nearer the north star than that...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. George H. Freeman

(See Grant) Ruth Jane, daughter of Ellis and Mary (Fields) Dick was born in Delaware District January 8, 1870, and was educated in the Cherokee National Schools. Married October 17, 1884, Charles Henry, Hawkins, born in Lewis County, Missouri, October 16, 1860. They are the parents of Emma Lee Hawkins, born near Catale, February 18, 1898. Married at Claremore, September 12, 1919, George H. son of John and Martha Freeman, born February 15, 1896. They are the parents of Paul Lawrence Freeman, born August 2, 1920. Mr. Freeman served in the World War in Company H, 56th Infantry. Honorably discharged at Fort Sheridan, February 28,...

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Slave Narrative of Alice Alexander

Person Interviewed: Alice Alexander Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Jackson Parish, Louisiana Date of Birth: 1849 Age: 88 I was 88 years old the 15th of March. I was born in 1849, at Jackson Parish, Louisiana. My mother’s name was Mary Marlow , and father’s Henry Marlow. I can’t remember very much ’bout slavery ’cause I was awful small, but I am remember that my mother’s master, Colonel Threff died, and my mother, her husband, and as three chillun was handed down to Colonel Threff’s ‘poor en folks. Colonel Threff owned about two or three hundred head of niggers. and all or ’em was tributed to his poor kin. Ooh wee! he sho’ had fact a lot of them too! Master Joe Threff, one of his poor kin, took my nether, her husband, and three of us chillun from Louisiana to the Mississippi Line. Down there we lived in a one room log hut, and slept on homemade rail bad steads with cotton, and sometimes straw, mostly straw summers and cotton winners. I worked round the house and locked after de smaller chillun, I mean my mother’s chillun. Mostly we ate yeller meal corn bread and sorghum molasses. I ate possums when we could get ’em, but jest couldn’t stand rabbit meat. Didn’t know there was any Christmas or holidays in dem days. I can’t ‘membuh nothing...

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Slave Narrative of Charlie H. Hunter

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Charlie H. Hunter Location: 2213 Barker Street, West Raleigh, North Carolina Date of Birth: May, 1857 Place of Birth: Wake County NC Age: 80 My full name is Charlie H. Hunter. I wus borned an’ reared in Wake County, N. C., born May, 1857. My mother wus Rosa Hunter an’ my father wus named Jones. I never saw my father. We belonged to a family named Jones first, an’ then we wus sold to a slave owner seven miles Northwest by the name Joe Hayes an’ a terrible man he wus. He would get mad ’bout most anything, take my mother, chain her down to a log and whup her unmercifully while I, a little boy, could do nothing but stan’ there an’ cry, an’ see her whupped. We had fairly good food an’ common clothing. We had good sleeping places. My mother wus sold to a man named Smith. I married first Annie Hayes who lived sixteen months. No prayer meetings wus allowed on de plantations an’ no books of any kind. I can read an’ write, learned in a school taught by Northern folks after the surrender, Mr. an’ Mrs. Graves who taught in Raleigh in the rear of the African Methodist Episcopal church. The school house wus owned by the church. We played no games in slavery times. I saw...

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Slave Narrative of Frank Freeman

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Frank Freeman Location: 216 Tuppers Lane, Raleigh, North Carolina Date of Birth: December 14, 1857 Place of Birth: Wake County NC Age: 76 I was born near Rolesville in Wake County Christmas Eve, 24 of December 1857. I am 76 years old. My name is Frank Freeman and my wife’s name is Mary Freeman. She is 78 years old. We live at 216 Tuppers Lane, Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina. I belonged to ole man Jim Wiggins jus’ this side o’ Roseville, fourteen miles from Raleigh. The great house is standin’ there now, and a family by the name o’ Gill, a colored man’s family, lives there. The place is owned by ole man Jim Wiggins’s grandson, whose name is O. B. Wiggins. My wife belonged to the Terrells before the surrender. I married after the war. I was forty years ole when I was married. Old man Jim Wiggins was good to his niggers, and when the slave children were taken off by his children they treated us good. Missus dressed mother up in her clothes and let her go to church. We had good, well cooked food, good clothes, and good places to sleep. Some of the chimneys which were once attached to the slave houses are standing on the plantation. The home plantation in Wake County was 3000 acres. Marster...

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