Surname: Frazier

1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

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1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East...

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Biography of Jacob Frazier

This pioneer of the wool business in Eastern Oregon, and owner of some of the best buildings in Pendleton, is a native of the Buckeye state (1820), and while but a boy of ten went with his father to Indiana, and as a youth of sixteen to Iowa. In this state, then known locally as the Black Hawk purchase, his father died at the advanced age of eighty-three. In 1850 Mr. Frazer crossed the plains to California with horses, being one of a party of five. This company was made to pay a toll of sugar, flour, etc., by the Sioux, and near Salt Lake had eight of their eleven horses stolen. Frazer himself was sick at the time; but two of the company gave chase and recaptured the animals, arriving at Hangtown (more euphoniously Placerville), our pioneer began gold digging. One of the first men he met in the country was his brother Montgomery, who had been out a year, and who had been very successful, insomuch tat he returned East soon after and bought the farm in Iowa which Jacob had first purchased with the avails of a big job of wood-chopping that he had undertaken for the brother of Jefferson Davis. Four years of mining life proved hazardous. Indeed, the list of casualties to which Mr. Frazer was subject suggest some sort of protecting agency that...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Samuel Frazier

(See Ward)-Sarah Ann, daughter of Cal Dean and Nancy (Ward) Gunter was born at Siloam Springs, Arkansas January 31, 1867 and was educated in the Cherokee national schools. Married April 10, 1888 Samuel, son of William Thomas and Nancy Frazier, born October 29, 1864 in Texas. They are the parents of: Cal Dean, born February 26, 1889; Lela Jessie born July 13, 1892; Grace, born November 6, 1897; Lillian born March 6, 1904 and William Thomas Frazier, born June 12, 1909. Mr. Frazier is a farmer and stock raiser near Adair. James, Son of John and Catherine (McDaniel) Ward was born October 22, 1785 married Lucy Haynie born October 30, 1787. He died May 20, 1859 and. she died September 26, 1869. They were the parents of Nancy Ward, born January 29, 1830, married September 21, 1845 Cal Dean Gunter, born March 30, 1818 in Warren County, Tennessee. He died March 27,...

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Slave Narrative of Amanda Oliver

Person Interviewed: Amanda Oliver Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Missouri Date of Birth: November 9, 1857 Age: 80 I ‘membuh what my mother say, I was born November 9, 1857, in Missouri. I was ’bout eight years old, when she was sold to a master named Harrison Davis. They said he had two farms in Missouri, but when he moved to northern Texas he brought me, my mother, Uncle George, Uncle Dick and a cullud girl they said was 15 with ‘im. He owned ’bout 6 acres on de edge of town near Sherman, Texas, and my mother and ’em was all de slaves he had. They said he sold off some of de folks. We didn’t have no overseers in northern Texas, but in southern Texas dey did. Dey didn’t raise cotton either: but dey raised a whole lots of corn. Sometime de men would shuck corn all night long. Whenever dey was going to shuck all night de women would piece quilts while de men shuck de corn and you could hear ’em singing and shucking corn. After de cornshucking, de cullud folks would have big dances. Master Davis lived in a big white frame house. My mother lived in the yard in a big one-room log hut with a brick chimney. De logs was “pinted” (what dey call plastered now with line). I don’t...

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Biography of Elisha E. Frazier

ELISHA E. FRAZIER, the subject of this sketch is one of the prominent farmers and stockraisers of Lincoln Township. He is the son of Dr. Lorenzo Lowe and Hannah (Bryant) Frazier, natives probably of North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively, the former born July 11, 1819, and the latter March 3, 1821. When a boy Dr. Frazier went with his parents to Tennessee, and received a moderate education, but a rather liberal one for that day. On the 9th of July, 1839, he was married to Miss Bryant and later emigrated to Missouri, where he taught school for some time. He served under Capt. Cunningham in the removal of the Cherokee Indians to the Territory, and for this received a tract of land in what is now Lincoln Township, Christian County, Missouri To this farm he removed in 1849, and died on the same August 31, 1890. When a young man he read medicine with a Dr. Clark in Tennessee, but followed agricultural pursuits until after he came to Missouri, which was about 1847 or 1848. For the first year or so he rented land, but on account of the ill health of the family there moved the next year two miles west, on his grant and into a rail pen with his wagon cover for a roof. Gradually, after coming to Missouri, he began practicing his profession and soon...

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Biography of Nathan Frank Frazier

Nathan Frank Frazier. Among the names that have been long and prominently identified with the businese, agricultural, mining and financial interests of Kansas, few have attained greater prestige than that which attaches to the name of Frazier. There is hardly an industry of importance that can be mentioned that had not beneflted by the activities of the men who have borne it, and today there are found two able and worthy representatives of the family in the persons of Nathan Frank Frazier and Ray E. Frazier, vice president and president respectively of the Citizens State Bank of El Dorado and sons of the late Nathan Frank Frasier the elder, who was one of this part of Kansas’ most highly respected cltlzens, able financiers and influential men of business. To have accomplished so notable an achievement as did the elder Nathan F. Frazier in connection with Kansas banking, even though this represented the sum total of his efforts, would have been sufflcient to gain prestige and reputation for any man; but Mr. Frasier was a man of broad mental powers, strong individuality and initiative, who left not only a lasting impression in the field of enterprise mentioned, hut was also a most potent factor in the commercial and agricultural development of Southern Kansas, while his activities also invaded the states of Missouri and Oklaboma and made him nearly squally as...

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Biographical Sketch of Ray E. Frazier

Ray E. Frazier, the elder son of Nathan F. and Emma (Crook) Frazier, was born at El Dorado September 15, 1876. He received his education in the public schools of El Dorado and at Wentworth Military Academy, Lexington, Missouri, from which he was graduated in 1895, and began his financial training in a minor position in the Merchants National Bank, or which his father was president. There he evinced a marked aptitude for banking and applied himself so earnestly to his duties that upon the organization of the Citizens State Bank he was made assistant cashier and later vice president. In the death of his father, in 1907, be succeeded him as president of the institution, the executive interests of which he had since ably dirccted. Mr. Frazier inherited much of his father’s keen business acumen, and is poasessed of a pleasing personality and a faculty for making friends and retaining them. He had large interesls in oil and farm lands in Kansas and Oklahoma, and also owned valuable farm lands in Missouri. On June 17, 1903, Mr. Frazier was married to Miss Henrietta Ellet, daughter of Howard C. Ellet, Mr. Frazier’s father’s former banking associate and for many years a resident of El Dorado. Mr. and Mrs. Frazler have one daughter, Henrietta, born November 13, 1905. Mrs. Frazier, a woman of culture and of rare personal charm, is...

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Biographical Sketch of Nathan Frank Frazier, Jr.

Nathan Frank Frazier, Jr., the younger son of Nathan F. and Elmma (Crook) Frazier, and vice president of the Citizens State Bank of El Dorado, was born at El Dorado March 13, 1882. He was reared in his native town, where he received his preparatory education in the public schools, following which he entered Lake Forest Academy at Lake Forest, Illinois, from which institution he was graduated in 1903. After graduation he was employed at Kansas City, Missouri, for a short time, and then returned to El Dorado, where he became associated with his father and assisted the elder man in bandling his extensive business interests. In 1905, together with his father and his brother, Ray E., he acquired large oil properties in Southeastern Kansas and Oklahoma and organized several oil companies, with headquarters at Bartlesville, Oklahoma. Mr. Frazier becarne an officer and director in these companies, and still retains his holdings, which have increased in value and have become very profitable. He is active vice presldent and one of the largest stockholders in the Citizens State Bank of El Dorado, and is active in the conduct of the daily affairs of the institntion, had also large holdings in farm and grazing lands in Kansas and Oklahoma, and owned and operates a farm eomprising 1,000 acres a few miles south of Towanda. This farm includes in its acreage some...

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Biographical Sketch of James Welch Frazier

Frazier, James Welch; consulting engineer; born, Pittsburgh, Pa., July 4, 1870; son of George G. and Sadie B. Smith Frazier; educated, Grammar and High School, Allegheny, Pa.; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; graduated, 1894, degree of Civil Engineer; married, Troy, N. Y., 1895, Jennie H. Van Deusen; two daughters, Ruth and Helen; chief engineer Federal St. & Pleasant Valley R. R., Pittsburg, 1894-1896; asst. engineer Pennsylvania Co., in office of chief engineer, 1896-1899; engineer Brown Hoisting Mchy. Co., 1899-1905; member of firm Frazier & Fox, 1905-1910; pres. The J. W. Frazier Co., 1910, to date; member of board of consulting engineers in connection with construction of Detroit-Superior High Level Bridge; director The Civic League of Cleveland; past pres. The Cleveland Engineering Society; member Rensselaer Society of Civil Engineers, American Society of Civil Engineers, and Cleveland Engineering Society; member Athletic, Colonial, City, and Automobile Clubs, Chamber of...

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Frazier, Michael – Obituary

Graveside services for Michael Frazier of Clarkston, Wash., son of the late James Edward and Viola Johnson Frazier, will be held April 12, 2008, at 11 a.m. at the Wallowa Cemetery. He was 63. He is survived by daughter Toni Carson and her husband, Trevor, of Burns; sister, Peggy, and her husband Marvin Zemmer of Prairie City; brothers and their wives, Jim and Mary Frazier of Asotin, Wash., Bill and Ruby Frazier of Wallowa and Bob and Joyce Frazier of Twin Falls, Idaho; and two granddaughters. He is also survived by his uncle, Aldon Johnson and wife Sandra of Wallowa; aunt Lavern Johnson Frazier of Pendleton and numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. He was preceded in death by his parents, and a brother, Tim Frazier. A potluck will follow the services at the Wallowa IOOF Hall. Wallowa County Chieftain – April 10,...

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Ponca Tribe

Ponca Indians. One of the five tribes of the so-called Dhegiha group of the Siouan family, forming with the Omaha, Osage, and Kansa, the upper Dhegiha or Omaha division. The Ponca and Omaha have the same language, differing only in some dialectic forms and approximating the Quapaw rather than the Kansa and Osage languages. The early history of the tribe is the same as that of the other tribes of the group, and, after the first separation, is identical with that, of the Omaha. After the migration of the combined body to the mouth of Osage river the first division of the Omaha...

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Biographies of the Cherokee Indians

Whatever may be their origins in antiquity, the Cherokees are generally thought to be a Southeastern tribe, with roots in Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee, among other states, though many Cherokees are identified today with Oklahoma, to which they had been forcibly removed by treaty in the 1830s, or with the lands of the Eastern Band of Cherokees in western North Carolina. The largest of the so-called Five Civilized Tribes, which also included Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks, and Seminoles, the Cherokees were the first tribe to have a written language, and by 1820 they had even adopted a form of...

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